Tag Archives: National Library Week

Another Open Door

April 10-16, 2016 is National Library Week. This year’s NLW theme is “Libraries Transform”. This theme allows us to catch you up on many of the changes we’ve made/initiatives we’ve undertaken since January 2015, in order to enhance the services we provide to Stone Center Library patrons.

Web badge 468px x 60px: National Library Week, April 10-16, 2015, Libraries Transform

We saved our most dramatic transformation for last. In February, we had a door cut between the workroom and the librarian’s office!

This transformation involved a few noisy, dusty days but our patrons were flexible and understanding, and it was well worth it in the end.

This structural modification effectively makes the librarian’s office, the workroom, and the service desk, a unified service point and allows us to better serve our patrons through improved staff communication.

door6

View from the librarian’s office.

We hope you’ve enjoyed this weeklong peek into what we’ve been up to at the Stone Center Library. We look forward to seeing you soon!

 

 

SCL Reserves

April 10-16, 2016 is National Library Week. This year’s NLW theme is “Libraries Transform”. This theme allows us to catch you up on many of the changes we’ve made/initiatives we’ve undertaken since January 2015, in order to enhance the services we provide to Stone Center Library patrons.

Web badge 468px x 60px: National Library Week, April 10-16, 2015, Libraries Transform

Moving past the service desk into the adjacent work room, we come to the area where the Stone Center Library Reserves are held. Beginning in the spring of 2016, print reserve materials for the African, African American and Diaspora Studies Department (AAAD) are held at the Stone Center Library.

We did a lot of advance preparation before transferring this portion of the University Library print reserves from the House Undergraduate Library to the SCL, and we have made the necessary adjustments to the library space and our workflow in order to accommodate this service enhancement.

reserves

Course instructors for AAAD courses, for courses being held in the Stone Center, or anywhere on campus, can opt to have their print reserve materials held at the SCL.

Course Reserve Request Instructions

 

Two Whiteboards and a Monitor

April 10-16, 2016 is National Library Week. This year’s NLW theme is “Libraries Transform”. This theme allows us to catch you up on many of the changes we’ve made/initiatives we’ve undertaken since January 2015, in order to enhance the services we provide to Stone Center Library patrons.

Web badge 468px x 60px: National Library Week, April 10-16, 2015, Libraries Transform

Today, as we move even further into the SCL space, our post is a midweek double feature. It sounds like the beginning of a bad joke: “two whiteboards and monitor walk into the Stone Center Library…” but that’s a fairly accurate description of our two most recent service enhancements. Adjacent to the 3M gate, and opposite our CCI printer, is our service desk, where we now have a double-monitor, seen in action below.

monitorThe addition of a patron-facing monitor means that we’re better able to help our patrons navigate many of our electronically accessible tools and resources.

white boardsWe have also recently acquired mobile, erasable whiteboards that can be checked out at the SCL service desk. The boards are used by students for collaborative learning and they have also been used during recent events including the African Diaspora Women Artists Wikipedia Edit-a-thon and THATCamp Archiving Your Activism, hosted by the Stone Center Library.

Networked printing in the SCL

April 10-16, 2016 is National Library Week. This year’s NLW theme is “Libraries Transform”. This theme allows us to catch you up on many of the changes we’ve made/initiatives we’ve undertaken since January 2015, in order to enhance the services we provide to Stone Center Library patrons.

Web badge 468px x 60px: National Library Week, April 10-16, 2015, Libraries Transform

Today, we move into the library space, just beyond the 3M gate that counts library visitors, to the CCI printer that was installed in October, 2015. As a result, the SCL is now part of a networked printing system that “allows students, faculty and staff to print to ITS printers from anywhere on campus using their personal computers and a network connection.”

The printer has been very popular indeed. Because of the Stone Center’s strategic location, the printer located in the SCL serves not only students and other university affiliates who use the Stone Center building, but other buildings in the vicinity as well, including the Genome Science building and Coker Hall.

Screenshot (21)CCI printing campus map

 

Stone Center Library exhibits

April 10-16, 2016 is National Library Week. This year’s NLW theme is “Libraries Transform”. This theme allows us to catch you up on many of the changes we’ve made/initiatives we’ve undertaken, since January 2015, in order to enhance the services we provide to Stone Center Library patrons.

Web badge 468px x 60px: National Library Week, April 10-16, 2015, Libraries Transform

We begin our NLW blog series at the entrance to the Library. In the hallway adjacent to the Library, we have used the flat case to promote events being hosted or otherwise supported by the Stone Center Library.

murap_flatcase

Pictured above, our summer 2015 display featured the university logos of the members of the MURAP cohort as well as information about the series of research skills labs being offered by the library for MURAP students throughout the summer.

negrodigest

Just inside entrance to the Library, we have used our small exhibit cases to feature micro collections owned by the Library. Pictured above is our fall 2015 display of Negro Digest and Black World magazines, donated to us by retired UNC anthropology professor Norris Brock Johnson.

20160218_105802

Our current display, pictured above, is about the early history of the Stone Center Library. We hope you’ll stop by to see it before May 15.

Tomorrow’s blog post will feature our most popular service enhancement. Can you guess what it is?

 

The SCL Transforms!

Facebook cover art: Celebrate National Library Week, April 10-16, 2016, Libraries Transform

April 10-16, 2016 is National Library Week. The 2016 NLW theme is ‘Libraries Transform’. We thought we would take this opportunity to tell you about the many ways in which the Stone Center Library has transformed in the last year. Each day next week, progressing from the entrance of the library, through the entire library space, the blog will feature an aspect of our transformation and how it has allowed us to improve our support of teaching and learning at UNC Chapel Hill. Stay tuned!

National Library Week 2011: More of what’s new @the Stone Center Library

In honor of National Library Week, our coverage of new arrivals currently on display here at the library continues.  Today’s theme is religion:

“This phenomenological analysis of African American religious subjectivity suggests the tragic, understood as an ontological category, as the seminal hermeneutical lens through which one can deepen one’s understanding of the experience and its theological implications.”

“The author provides background information on traditional black churches and today’s black megachurches and explores the influences of the former on the empowering socialization educational tactics employed in megachurch congregations.”

“For AIDS scholars, researchers, and community activists, Harris (sociology, California State U., Fullerton) draws from her dissertation research and fieldwork to describe AIDS activism in black churches in New York City, the formation of the black church AIDS movement, and the organizational development and marketing and education strategies of The Balm In Gilead.”

In America after the Civil War, the emancipation of four million slaves and the explosion of Chinese immigration fundamentally challenged traditional ideas about who belonged in the national polity. As Americans struggled to redefine citizenship in the United States, the “Negro Problem” and the “Chinese Question” dominated the debate. . . The book further explores how blacks and Chinese reimagined the evangelical nationalist project to suit their own needs and hopes. Historian Derek Chang brings together for the first time African American and Chinese American religious histories through a multitiered local, regional, national, and even transnational analysis of race, nationalism, and evangelical thought and practice.”

“This book explores the legacy of slavery in Black theological terms. Challenging the dominant approaches to the history and legacy of slavery in the British Empire, the contributors show that although the 1807 act abolished the slave trade, it did not end racism, notions of White supremacy, or the demonization of Blackness, Black people and Africa.”

“Touching on issues of slavery, geography, Native American history, Jewish-Christian relations, literacy, and translation, he brilliantly exposes how the loss of land and the supersessionist ideas behind the Christian missionary movement are both deeply implicated in the invention of race.”

“This book follows the extraordinary career of Dwight York, who in his teens started out in a New York street gang, but converted to Islam in prison. Emerging as a Black messiah, York proceeded to break the Paleman’s “spell of Kingu” and to guide his people through a series of racial/religious identities that demanded dramatic changes in costume, gender roles and lifestyle.”

“Beginning with King’s roots in Atlanta’s Ebenezer Baptist Church, Baldwin traces the evolution of King’s attitude toward the church through his college, seminary, graduate school, and civil rights years. The emphasis is on King’s concept of the church as “the voice of conscience.” . . Baldwin critiques the contemporary church on the basis of King’s prophetic model, and concludes by insisting that this model, not the entrepreneurial spirituality of the contemporary megachurches, embodies the best potential for much-needed church renewal.”

“The changes to U.S. immigration law that were instituted in 1965 have led to an influx of West African immigrants to New York, creating an enclave Harlem residents now call ”Little Africa.” These immigrants are immediately recognizable as African in their wide-sleeved robes and tasseled hats, but most native-born members of the community are unaware of the crucial role Islam plays in immigrants’ lives.”

Interested in learning more?  Don’t forget the Stone Center Library Guide to the Web, which  includes a section on Church Life, found within the category of Society and Government

Coming tomorrow: our series concludes with a look at new selections having to do with themes of community, migration, identity, and heritage.  Stay tuned!

National Library Week 2011: Celebrate with more new books @the SCL!

Yesterday, we posted a handful of the new books currently on display here at the library.  Today, we continue with a selection of those books pertaining to the arts, identity, and untold stories of the African Diaspora.  Click on the links below for more information, or come see us at the Stone Center Library:

“Focusing on orally transmitted cultural forms in the Caribbean, this book reaffirms the importance of myth and symbol in folk consciousness as a mode of imaginative conceptualization.”

“Lorick-Wilmore (sociology, Northeastern U.) explores the specific role and functions of community-based organizations in the creation of Black ethnic identity options for Caribbean immigrants in New York City.”

“Allegory and Meaning is the study of the allegorical-cum-symbolic mode in selected African, African American, and Caribbean literary works. It argues that the domain of allegory in these works constitutes, at bottom, a contested site of paradoxes. The discussion of these African, African American, and Caribbean writers’ use of the allegorical mode is a serious attempt to recover the subtext of their works.”

“Afro-Cuban Diasporas in the Atlantic World explores how Yoruba and Afro-Cuban communities moved across the Atlantic between the Americas and Africa in successive waves in the nineteenth century.”

“This book looks at the experiences of the average black person in England and Wales during the period of the British slave trade. . . This book overturns many of the conventional assumptions that have been made about their lives. They were not enslaved, stigmatised outsiders but woven into English society as government officials, defenders of the country, tradesmen, entertainers and founders of families who have left a legacy of their presence in the form of descendants that in some cases can be traced to the present day.”

 

Stay tuned!  Coming tomorrow: new books on African and African-American religions.

National Library Week 2011! More new titles @your [Stone Center] library!

Yesterday marked the start of ALA’s National Library Week 2011 and this year’s theme is “Create your own story @your library.”  If you’re looking for new stories to add to your arsenal, be sure to check out the Stone Center Library’s latest display of new titles.

Interested in Caribbean topics?  Then today’s highlights might be right up your alley.  Click on the links below for more information, or come by the library to browse in person!

“Clarke and Clarke have created a journal that provides an ethnographic record of the East Indians and Creoles of San Fernando–and the entire sugar belt south of the town known as Naparima. They record socio-political relations during the second year of Trinidad’s independence (1964), and provide first-hand evidence for the workings of a complex, plural society in which race, religion, and politics had become, and have remained, deeply intertwined.”

“Contrary to popular belief, the ideology of empire in the nineteenth-century British produced a number of West Indian Creoles who took the language and values of Britain’s supposedly liberal empire and turned them upside down. . . Inverting the racist hierarchy of nineteenth-century British imperial thought, twentieth-century political activists in the British West Indies used the concepts of liberal ideology to claim that the subject people of the West Indies constituted a Creole nation that deserved the right to govern itself.”

“This ground-breaking study of the Caribbean’s iconography traces the history of visual representations of the region, as perceived by outsider and insider alike, over the last five hundred years.”

“Artists, teachers, administrators, and researchers survey many facets of dance in the region, both folk dance from African and colonial heritages, and art dance that has mingled those traditions with others around the world.”

“Lewis’ last manuscript, The Modern Caribbean: a New Voyage of Discovery,” was scheduled to be published about the time of his death in 1991. Most of the chapters in this volume come from that previously unpublished work, although a few others are included. Lewis, a social scientist who was based at the University of Puerto Rico since 1955, wrote widely on the Caribbean from an interdisciplinary point of view.”

 

Coming tomorrow: new titles on display relating to other aspects of the African diaspora.