Tag Archives: Online resources

SCL Picks for Women’s History Month

March is Women’s History Month and here at the Library options abound for those of you interested in women’s studies from a variety of approaches. Perhaps you’ve read the extremely popular novel The Help, have seen the award-winning film, or both. Love it or hate it, this complex work has inspired spirited debate with regard to its portrayal of race relations. Along these lines, today we thought we would feature a couple of our holdings on motherhood and the domestic sphere in the American South. Check out:

Born southern : childbirth, motherhood, and social networks in the old South, by V. Lynn Kennedy (2010).

  • “Kennedy’s unique approach links the experiences of black and white women, examining how childbirth and motherhood created strong ties to family, community, and region for both. She also moves beyond a simple exploration of birth as a physiological event, examining the social and cultural circumstances surrounding it: family and community support networks, the beliefs and practices of local midwives, and the roles of men as fathers and professionals. . . Kennedy’s systematic and thoughtful study distinguishes southern approaches to childbirth and motherhood from northern ones, showing how slavery and rural living contributed to a particularly southern experience.” (Source: http://search.lib.unc.edu/search?R=UNCb6283703)

Cooking in other women’s kitchens : domestic workers in the South, 1865-1960, by Rebecca Sharpless (2010).

  • “Through letters, autobiography, and oral history, this book evokes African American women’s voices from slavery to the open economy, examining their lives at work and at home. Sharpless looks beyond stereotypes to introduce the real women who left their own houses and families each morning to cook in other women’s kitchens.” (Source: http://search.lib.unc.edu/search?R=UNCb6460585)

If this topic piques your interest, don’t forget we’re always happy to provide further recommendations and/or reference assistance – by phone, email, or chat (StoneCenterRef). And in case you missed it the first time, here’s our Women’s History Month Round-Up of previous SCL blog entries and online resources in women’s studies, including the Stone Center Library’s Guide to the Web.

Next up on the SCL blog: Have you come by the Library lately? Make sure you check out our latest display, featuring hand-picked selections by Stone Center Librarian Shauna Collier for Women’s History Month. Stay tuned!

Women’s History Month Round-Up

March marks the start of Women’s History Month and this year’s theme is “Women’s Education – Women’s Empowerment.” Before going on  a brief blogging hiatus for Spring Break next week, we thought we’d jump-start the month with a round-up of online resources and pertinent posts from the SCL blog archives. 

For example… did you know our Stone Center Library Guide to the Web contains a wealth of sites related to women’s history, achievements, and issues  across a variety of disciplines? Check out some simple searches here, here, and here.  From science and technology to literature and the arts, we’ve got you covered! 

In addition to these general resources, we’ve periodically featured profiles of compelling women of historical and cultural significance. See, for example, our previous posts highlighting the following female figures: 

Looking for a broader perspective? More of a book person? You’re in luck! Over the last couple of years we’ve taken the time to put together lists of recommendations for Women’s History Month which you may consult at your leisure: here, here, here, and here

We hope these links provide some inspiration for whatever your research or reading needs may be, and hope that you will check in after the break for more from us as we continue to celebrate women’s history here at the Stone Center Library. Finally, best of luck to those of you winding your way through midterm exams and assignments – Spring Break is almost here! 

New @the SCL: Military History

Over the course of Black History Month 2012, we’ve posted SCL Picks and new titles on a variety of topics: literature, fine arts, religion, gender, film studies, love, and even the first published novel by an African American woman. As February comes to a close, we thought we would round things out with four  recent titles in the area of military history.

As always, we also encourage you to make use of the Stone Center Library’s Guide to the Web, which includes a section of online resources covering African American military history. Plus, did you know the itself Guide is searchable? In addition to perusing the Guide by topic, the “Search the Guide” bar allows for keyword searching to pull sites listed in the guide from across sections. For example, searching for “Tuskegee” yields this list of websites contained within the Guide: http://bit.ly/wnbZGo. Happy searching!

Cesária Évora: 08/27/1941-12/17/2011

Renown Cape Verdean singer Cesária Évora died this past weekend at age 70. Earning monikers such as “The Barefoot Diva”  and “The Queen of Morna,” Évora began performing at age 16. Releasing her first album in 1988, by 2003 she had earned a Grammy for her album Voz D’Amor.

An international star, Évora became famous for her distinctive contralto and soulful performances of songs of lament and longing. Indeed, “Évora was considered one of the world’s greatest exponents of Morna, a form of blues considered the national music of the Cape Verde islands, a former Portuguese colony which gained independence in 1975.” (http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/entertainment-arts-16232543). For more on her life and legacy, see the following links for obituaries published in the New York Times, the BBC, and the Washington Post, among others. You may also hear a brief clip of Évora in performance here.

For those of you who are UNC affiliates, if you’re interested in a more extensive discussion of her career from a sociological perspective we encourage you to make use of the new Articles+ search tool to locate the following article: “Cesária Évora: ‘The Barefoot Diva’ and Other Stories.” (by Carla Martin, in Transition, No. 103, Cabo Verde (2010), pp. 82-97). Here at the SCL we also have Music is the weapon of the future : fifty years of African popular music (2002), which includes the chapter “From Kode di Dona to Cesaria Evora: Sodade in A Major: The Music of Cape Verde”  (p. 191).

African American History and Culture: publications from UNC’s Center for the Study of the American South

If you haven’t already seen it, we highly recommend perusing the current issue of Southern Cultures, which is put out by UNC’s Center for the Study of the American South, and features a couple of articles of special interest:

–   “Bobby Rush: “Blues Singer–Plus,” written by William R. Ferris, who is Joel R. Williamson Eminent Professor of History, Senior Associate Director of the Center for the Study of the American South, and Adjunct Professor of Folklore at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

–   “For the Records: How African American Consumers and Music Retailers Created Commercial Public Space in the 1960s and 1970s South,” written by Joshua Clark Davis, who is a UNC-CH PhD and currently a fellow at the German Historical Institute in Washington, D.C, researching “the globalization of African American music and consumer culture.”

In addition, the Center has conveniently compiled an extensive two-part collection of their publications on African American History and Culture, spanning the last ten years. Be sure to check it out here: Part I & Part II.

Feedback wanted! What do YOU think of the new SCL blog?

Happy Friday, everyone! Today marks the first day of fall and we thought we’d share some of what we were up to this busy summer. As you may have noticed, we rolled out some significant changes here on the SCL blog. In addition to a new theme, we’ve started expanding and displaying tags more prominently to encourage browsing.

Here are some highlights:

So let us know… what do YOU think of the new blog design? What else would you like to see us do? Leave us a comment! 🙂

Hispanic Heritage Month: September 15-October 15

Did you know? Yesterday marked the start of National Hispanic Heritage Month, which is observed from September 15-October 15. This holiday period was established in 1968 and recognizes the contributions and heritage of those U.S. citizens whose ancestry traces back to Spain, Mexico, the Caribbean and Central and South America.

As explained on the official website, “The day of September 15 is significant because it is the anniversary of independence for Latin American countries Costa Rica, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras and Nicaragua. In addition, Mexico and Chile celebrate their independence days on September 16 and September18, respectively. Also, Columbus Day or Día de la Raza, which is October 12, falls within this 30 day period.”

This year’s theme is “Many Backgrounds, Many Stories…One American Spirit” and a wealth of related resources are available online: exhibitions and collections, images, and even audio and video clips.

Here at the Stone Center Library, we have numerous books on Latin American topics… check out a sampling below, and stay tuned for more highlights over the course of the month!

Happy reading! 🙂

Welcome back, students!

Here at the Stone Center Library we’re excited to see the campus abuzz with students again. We hope you all are settling into your respective schedules and routines and – as always – we encourage you to make use of our resources and study spaces over the course of the semester.

So please be sure to…

—–>Come by the Library! We’re on the third floor of the Stone Center, on South Rd by the Bell Tower. Starting September 6, our hours are M-Th 8am-8pm and F 8am-5pm.

—–> Send us your reference questions! Our chat buddy name is StoneCenterRef. Or contact Stone Center Librarian Shauna Collier at colliers@email.unc.edu for an in-person consultation.

—–> Check out our Guide to the Web!

—–>Follow us on Facebook!

Best of luck with classes, and we hope to see you soon! 🙂

New online exhibit: 43rd Anniversary of Black Student Movement at Carolina

The Carolina Digital Library and Archives has published a new virtual exhibit, which chronicles the history of the Black Student Movement at Carolina.  Check it out here: http://museum.unc.edu/exhibits/black_student_movement/.  The Black Student Movement at Carolina marks its 43rd anniversary this November, making this a timely opportunity to get to know your UNC history.

This exhibit was a cooperative effort between Wilson Library, the CDLA, and the Center for the Study of the American South.  You can also keep up with the CDLA on Facebook, where they have posted a note about the exhibit as well.  Happy reading!

The Pauli Murray Project

The Pauli Murray Project is based in nearby Durham, NC and is run by Duke University’s Human Rights Center. Their mission is “to build stronger ties between our Durham, North Carolina communities through dialogue, education, storytelling and the creation of new ways of telling our unique history. In this work we honor the legacy and values of one of Durham’s unsung heroes, lawyer, activist, poet and priest, Pauli Murray”. The project’s website contains a wealth of information on Murray: a detailed biography, timeline, a bibliography of her writings, and useful listing of works about her. Or click here for a 1 minute video summarizing the project.

The Pauli Murray project is particularly interested in community input and collaboration, including their 2007-09 series “Face Up: Telling Stories of Community”. There are plenty of ways to get involved – sign up for their email list or contact them about volunteer opportunities. You can also follow the Project on Facebook.

In addition to next week’s event at UNC’s Wilson Library, the Pauli Murray Project will be hosting several commemorative events throughout the month of November and beyond. Check out the Pauli Murray Centennial Celebration events calendar here for further information.