“Can you get a date for my roommate? She’s real cute!”

About a year ago, we wrote about restrictions on UNC’s female students in the 1950s and 1960s. Women were often not allowed to travel alone or after certain hours.  While perusing  a fraternity scrapbook from 1951, we found a telegram from a student’s sweetheart referencing these types of rules.

From the Records of the North Carolina Xi of Sigma Alpha Epsilon Fraternity.  SV-40334/1, Scrapbook, 1951-1952.

From the Records of the North Carolina Xi of Sigma Alpha Epsilon Fraternity. SV-40334/1, Scrapbook, 1951-1952.

 

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GOOOOOOAL! Soccer’s illustrious history at UNC

 

From the Department of Athletic Communications Records (#40308), University Archives.

From the Department of Athletic Communications Records (#40308), University Archives.

All eyes are on soccer this summer as countries from around the globe compete in the World Cup, so we thought it would be a good time to take a look at the history of soccer at UNC.

In the 1930s, soccer was offered as an activity in Physical Education classes and as a club sport. Men’s soccer gained varsity status in 1947, and just one year later the team won the Southern Conference title. In 1963, Nigerian student Edwin Okoroma joined the soccer team, becoming the first black varsity athlete at the university. 

Eddie Pope, from the 1994 Yackety Yack, North Carolina Collection.

Eddie Pope, from the 1994 Yackety Yack, North Carolina Collection.

UNC joined the ACC in 1953, and since then the men’s soccer team has won four ACC titles and two NCAA Championships. In 2002, the ACC named its top 50 soccer players in ACC history and included five from UNC: David Smyth, Gregg Berhalter, Eddie Pope, Carey Talley, and Chris Carrieri. Pope played for the US Men’s National Team  in the 1996, 2002, and 2006 World Cups, and Berhalter did so in 1994, 2002, and 2006.

 

Mia Hamm, from the UNC Department of Athletics Records (#40093)

Mia Hamm, from the UNC Department of Athletics Records (#40093)

Women’s soccer gained varsity status in 1979, and has become the most successful athletic program in the university’s history. The team has won 21 national titles, nine of them earned consecutively between 1986 and 1994. In 1992, the team set the NCAA record for uninterrupted wins (58). Twenty-five former or current players—including Mia Hamm, Heather O’Reilly, Kristine Lilly, Tobin Heath, Lorrie Fair, April Heinrichs, and Cat Whitehill—have appeared in the Women’s World Cup either as players or as coaches. UNC women’s soccer coach Anson Dorrance also coached the US women’s national team to victory in the very first Women’s World Cup in 1991.

 

 

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Summer Plans

From the Records of the North Carolina Xi of Sigma Alpha Epsilon Fraternity.  SV-40334/2, Scrapbook, 1954.

A 1954 scrapbook from the Records of the North Carolina Xi Chapter of Sigma Alpha Epsilon Fraternity (SV-40334/2).

This page from a 1954 scrapbook shows members of UNC’s chapter of Sigma Alpha Epsilon fraternity and friends on a trip to the beach.

What are your plans this summer?  Will you be going to the beach?

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New V-Day Carolina Collection

Another new collection at University Archives arrived recently! The V-Day collection from the V-Day Carolina student group contains digital and physical material from 2006 to 2014 related to performances of the Vagina Monologues at UNC in English and Spanish.

FinalBenefitFlyer2013

Flyer for a 2013 V-Day Benefit from the V-Day Carolina Records ( #40431), University Archives.

V-Day Carolina is a chapter of an international organization that works to end violence against girls and women.

Note: The materials referenced in this blog post have not yet been processed and are currently not available to researchers. If you are interested in viewing these materials in person, please contact University Archives before your visit to determine their availability.

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UNC Parachute Club records make a landing at University Archives

Flyer for the 1971-1972 National Collegiate Parachuting Championships. From the Records of the UNC Parachute Club (#40390), University Archives.

Flyer for the 1971-1972 National Collegiate Parachuting Championships. From the Records of the UNC Parachute Club (#40390), University Archives.

Last week, University Archives was excited to receive the records of the UNC Sport Parachute Club, a student organization founded in 1969.

The team represented the University in inter-collegiate competitions including the 1971-1972 National Collegiate Parachuting Championships (flyer above). Notice the spot below the falling parachutist—in competitions, participants were judged upon the accuracy of their landing in relation to a 10-centimeter disc.

Club member and records donor F. J. Hale recalls:

All of us saw similar rewards in parachuting; its beauty and exhilaration, and the unsurpassed freedom of being flung through the sky, and sailing gradually to earth under a huge nylon cloud.

Photos from the Records of the UNC Parachute Club (#40390), University Archives.

Note: The materials referenced in this blog post have not yet been processed and are currently not available to researchers. If you are interested in viewing these materials in person, please contact University Archives before your visit to determine their availability.

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20 Facts for 20 Years!

On this day in 1994, the Old Chapel Hill Cemetery was placed on the National Register of Historic Places.  Carolina’s students, staff, and faculty pass the Cemetery on a regular basis.  It is as much a part of the campus as the Arboretum or the Bell Tower.  In honor of the 20th anniversary of its addition to the National Register of Historic Places, we’ve made a list of 20 facts about the Cemetery.  How many did you already know?

The Old Chapel Hill Cemetery on UNC Chapel Hill's campus.

The Old Chapel Hill Cemetery on UNC Chapel Hill’s campus.

  1. The original 125 acres was sold to the College in October of 1776 for 5 shillings. That would be $40.65 today!
  2. The first recorded burial was George Clarke.  George was a student from Burke County, NC.  He died September 28, 1798.  He was also a member of the Philanthropic Society.  Although he was the first buried, his stone was not placed until the mid-nineteenth century.
  3. The Dialectic and Philanthropic Societies were the first to buy plots in the Cemetery.  When students passed away and their homes were too far away for quick transport, the respective society would bury the student in their plot. In fact, the Di and Phi Societies were as competitive in burying their members as they were in everything else before they became a united organization. The societies were constantly trying to one-up each other with the erection of monuments in their cemetery plots.  The Phi Society once commissioned an eight-foot high Italian Marble monument for a deceased member.
  4. In 1835, it was officially named the College Graveyard.  This did not stop Chapel Hill residents from calling it the “Village Cemetery” though.  It was renamed upon the completion of a low wall encompassing the entirety of the property.
  5. All cemetery plots have already been purchased.  The Cemetery isn’t entirely full yet, but plots are off the market!

    UNC Chapel Hill recognizes the segregated section of the historic cemetery.

    UNC Chapel Hill recognizes the segregated section of the historic cemetery.

  6. Two sections of the Cemetery were reserved for African Americans and segregated from the other four by a low rock wall. The section was established because there were no black church cemeteries in Chapel Hill. Many of those buried in sections A and B were university laborers and servants who were often slaves or former slaves. The earliest (marked) grave in this part of the cemetery belongs to Ellington Burnett (1831-1853).
  7. Confederate soldiers were buried in the Cemetery during the Civil War. Their stones are marked with “C.S.A.”
  8. Like most cemeteries, Chapel Hill’s has had a problem with vandalism. It’s unclear whether or not vandalism has been intentional or accidental.  For example, in 1974, 40 to 50 monuments were broken and pushed off their bases.  However, in 1985, stones were damaged by football fans eager to get to their seats. 
  9. In 1922, the town of Chapel Hill took over responsibility for maintaining the Cemetery.  However, in 1988, ownership was transferred to the University.
  10. The oldest monument in the Cemetery belongs to the grave of Margaritta Chapman, who died in 1814 at the age of 16.  Although George Clarke was the first buried, his monument was not erected immediately upon his death.
  11. Charles Kuralt is buried in the Old Chapel Hill Cemetery. Before he launched his successful journalism career, Kuralt spent so much time working on the The Daily Tar Heel in his senior year that he ended up failing all of his other classes!  Since many of the plots had already been purchased, Charles Kuralt would not have been buried in the Old Chapel Hill Cemetery had the Pickard Family not relinquished a plot.
  12. The Cemetery holds the graves of more than 800 African Americans. Many of the graves are unmarked. The segregated section of the Cemetery has since been recognized with a sign post remembering those buried there. While many of the graves are still unmarked, the Preservation Society of Chapel Hill did conduct a survey of the segregated area in 2009.

    Wilson Caldwell.  From the North Carolina Collection Photographic Archives.

    Wilson Caldwell. From the North Carolina Collection Photographic Archives.

  13. Wilson Caldwell is buried in the Old Chapel Hill Cemetery. Born a slave in 1841 to University President David Swain, Wilson was a much recognized member of the Carolina community during his lifetime.  When enslaved, Caldwell became the head janitor to the University.  After Emancipation, Caldwell stayed in the Chapel Hill area and established a school for African Americans in 1868.  He was also elected to the Board of Commissioners of Chapel Hill, bought 12 acres of land, and served as a justice of the peace.  In 1884, however, he returned to work for the University and maintained his position as the head of the campus workforce until his death in 1898.  Get more information on Wilson Caldwell here.
  14. Cars used to park on unmarked graves before football games until restrictions were implemented in 1991. We know parking is tight here, but thank goodness we’re showing a little more respect now!
  15. Several of the monuments in the Di-Phi plots were by the famous 19th Century stone carver George Lauder. Originally from Edinburgh, Scotland, Lauder lived in Raleigh and Fayetteville, NC.  He actually owned the largest gravestone factory in North Carolina in the 1800s!
  16. University trustees almost created a second cemetery in McCorkle Place! When the body of Dr. Joseph Caldwell was moved from the “College Graveyard” to its spot under the monument in McCorkle Place in 1846, the trustees briefly considered creating a new cemetery.  The idea never came to fruition though.
  17. Jane Tenney Gilbert (1896-1980) has the gravestone with the most school spirit. Ever.  Her epitaph reads: “I was a Tar Heel born and a Tar Heel bred/and here I lie a Tar Heel dead./BORN JAN. 1896 AND STILL HERE 1980.”
  18. There is a large sandstone obelisk in Section B, dedicated to the black servants of the University.  The obelisk is the original Joseph Caldwell monument from McCorkle Place, which was replaced in the late 19th century by a granite obelisk. It was rededicated in memory of Wilson Caldwell, his father November Caldwell and David Barham and Henry Smith, two other black university servants. Note that even though these men and women were “servants” to the University, some of them were enslaved by families in the area and loaned to the school.
  19. Five 19th century headstones were tipped over and smashed the day before Charles Kuralt was buried in the cemetery. We’re not sure if the vandalism was in anticipation of Charles Kuralt’s burial or if the timing was incidental.  We can’t imagine anyone having THAT much of a problem with Charles Kuralt!
  20. If you are so inclined, you can have your ashes scattered near the cemetery!  Memorial grove was created as the solution to the limited space of the Old Chapel Hill Cemetery.  It is UNC’s garden for the scattering and interment of ashes.  The garden is reserved for use by individuals with a university affiliation, and for immediate family members of those individuals. Because of the nature of a scattering garden, the space can accommodate an unlimited number of individuals, allowing anyone who wishes to maintain an eternal connection to the university to do so.
Jane Tenney Gilbert's spirited epitaph.

Jane Tenney Gilbert’s spirited epitaph.

Now you know!

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Memorial Day

College for War Training brochure, 1942.  From the Records of the Vice President for Finance, #40011, University Archives.

College for War Training brochure, 1942. From the Records of the Vice President for Finance, #40011, University Archives.

While Memorial Day might traditionally mark the beginning of the Summer Season for vacationers, it is also an important day of remembrance for the United States.  Every year, we remember everyone who has died in the service of our country.

Order of Gimghoul, 1944.  From the Records of the Order of Gimghoul, #40262, University Archives.

Order of Gimghoul, 1944. From the Records of the Order of Gimghoul, #40262, University Archives.

Established in the wake of the Civil War, Memorial Day was set aside as a day of remembrance for both Union and Confederate soldiers who had died in the conflict. However, as time went on, Memorial Day was extended in order to honor all Americans who had died in armed conflicts since the Civil War.

We are proud of all of Carolina’s students and their family members who gave their lives in service to their country.

Do you remember anyone special on Memorial Day?  

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New Collection from Carolina Performing Arts

We are happy to announce a new collection of Carolina Performing Arts materials at University Archives.  These digital and physical items are from the 2013-2014 season and are the beginning of an exciting collection that includes photos and video along with commemorative items from the Rite of Spring at 100.

Materials from the first transfer in the new Carolina Performing Arts collection

Materials from the first transfer in the new Carolina Performing Arts collection

Stay tuned for more about this collection!

Note: The materials referenced in this blog post have not yet been processed and are currently not available to researchers. If you are interested in viewing these materials in person, please contact University Archives before your visit to determine their availability.

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Swim to Graduate

"Intramural: swimming, group of ten," 5 October 1961.  From the UNC Photographic Laboratory Collection, P00031.

“Intramural: swimming, group of ten,” 5 October 1961. From the UNC Photographic Laboratory Collection, P00031.

We’re so proud of everyone who graduated yesterday! Congratulations! But did you know that up until 2006, all undergraduates were required to pass a swim test in order to graduate? Well, the swim test was not unique to Carolina. It used to be a requirement at many colleges and universities across the country. But where did the requirement come from exactly?

The legend at UNC, and many other campuses, starts with the death of a student by drowning. The student’s family decided to give a large endowment to the University after the incident but with the condition that all students know how to swim. This theory is nothing more than a myth though since many colleges and universities established swim tests during WWII when campuses became designated training programs.

In 1942, UNC was designated as a pre-flight training program by the US government, and the university was awarded funds to construct several structures on campus including the ROTC building, the outdoor pool, and the indoor track.  Of course, the midshipmen who were a part of the pre-flight training program had to learn to swim. During and after the war, national debates and discussions centered on whether America’s youth were fit enough to defend our country. So a compulsory swim test was implemented at UNC for men in 1944 and women in 1946.

The swim test remained unchanged until the 1970s when it was altered so that undergraduates had to swim 50 yds and tread water for 5 minutes. The test remained in place through the spring of 2006 when it was officially ended as a requirement for the fall semester.

"Swimming Physical Education," 31 October 1960. From the UNC Photographic Laboratory Collection, P00031

“Swimming Physical Education,” 31 October 1960. From the UNC Photographic Laboratory Collection, P00031

Did you have to take the swim test?  We’d love to hear about your experience! 

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A Fond Farewell to Electronic Records Archivist Meg Tuomala

Electronic Records Archivist Meg Tuomala

Electronic Records Archivist Meg Tuomala

This week we say goodbye to our dear friend and colleague Meg Tuomala, who departs University Archives for the beautiful (if rainy) climes of the Pacific Northwest.

Tuomala, a UNC alum, has served Wilson Library in several capacities–first as a graduate assistant in Special Collections Technical Services processing UARMS collections, then as   Records Services Archivist (2010-2011), and most recently as Electronic Records Archivist (2012-present). In her position as Electronic Records Archivist, she has worked to ensure the proper management and preservation of the University’s growing collections of born-digital materials.

Due to recent departures, University Archives will be without permanent staff for the time being. Requests for consultations and trainings may be put on hold until permanent replacements are hired, but UARMS will continue to approve and accept records transfers and answer any questions about records retention and disposition in the interim.

Please continue to email transfer forms, questions, and general inquiries to recman@unc.edu. Staff at the Wilson Special Collections Library will continue to monitor this email and respond to incoming messages. You may also call (919) 962-6402 to speak with staff who can answer your records management questions.

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