The Chimera Fantasy and Science Fiction Club

Although Carolina does not currently host any official sci-fi student groups, Chapel Hill was home to the Chimera Fantasy and Science Fiction Club from 1984 to 1996.  The Chimera Club was open to all students interested in science fiction and fantasy in film, television, fiction, and tabletop games. The Chimera Club even held an annual ChimeraCon for twelve years! A frequent guest to ChimeraCon was Orson Scott Card.  Card is the author of the popular novel-turned-film Ender’s Game.  Check out some of the ChimeraCon programs below!

From the Chimera Fantasy and Science Fiction Club of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Records, #40310-z

From the Chimera Fantasy and Science Fiction Club of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Records, #40310-z

From the Chimera Fantasy and Science Fiction Club of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Records, #40310-z

From the Chimera Fantasy and Science Fiction Club of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Records, #40310-z

From the Chimera Fantasy and Science Fiction Club of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Records, #40310-z

From the Chimera Fantasy and Science Fiction Club of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Records, #40310-z

From the Chimera Fantasy and Science Fiction Club of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Records, #40310-z

From the Chimera Fantasy and Science Fiction Club of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Records, #40310-z

From the Chimera Fantasy and Science Fiction Club of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Records, #40310-z

From the Chimera Fantasy and Science Fiction Club of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Records, #40310-z

From the Chimera Fantasy and Science Fiction Club of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Records, #40310-z

From the Chimera Fantasy and Science Fiction Club of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Records, #40310-z

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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“Phi Mu on View” celebrates 50 years of Phi Mu at Carolina

phi mu signThis weekend, many alumni and their families will return to campus for Homecoming, but for the sisters of Phi Mu’s Gamma Lambda chapter it will be an especially exciting occasion. The chapter is celebrating its 50th anniversary with a weekend of events including an exhibit in the lobby of Wilson Library.

The exhibit “Phi Mu on View” will feature the chapter’s 1964-1965 pledge scrapbook, records and photos related to the chapters’ purchase and renovation of the historic Brockwell House, the first issue of the Gamma Lambda Triangle, and much more. The chapter loaned these materials to University Archives last year.

The exhibit opens at noon on Friday, November 14th and will run through the weekend.

 

 

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October 10th is Electronic Records Day

Today is Electronic Records Day! The Council of State Archivists (CoSA) started the tradition of Electronic Records Day three years ago, and has flyers available for personal electronic records, government agencies working with electronic records, and why electronic records may need special attention.

Here at University Archives, we follow our retention schedule for all records regardless of format.  We know that sometimes electronic records present special challenges, though! Please see our guidelines page for information about records retention at UNC, including email.  The North Carolina State Archives also has helpful guidelines for electronic records. Finally, our FAQ page offers guidance for electronic records issues at UNC.

Of course, every day is Electronic Records Day for us, and we are here to support you if you have electronic records questions!

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Carolina Summer Reading Program

The Round House by Louise Erdrich

The Round House by Louise Erdrich

For the summer of 2014, incoming students were asked to read The Round House by Louise Erdrich.  Set on a Ojibwe reservation in North Dakota, the novel is a coming-of-age story about a boy on the cusp of manhood who seeks justice and understanding in the wake of a terrible crime that upends and forever transforms his family.  We hope that everyone who attended the Summer Reading discussions on August 18th enjoyed a stimulating conversation!

Composed of faculty, staff, and students, the book selection committee works to choose a book that meets the following criteria:

  • Intellectually stimulating — stretch students’ minds, cause students to think about things they might not have before
  • Enjoyable, engaging, relatively short, easy to read, up-to-date
  • Reading that will provoke interesting discussion
  • Appropriate for developmental level of incoming students
  • Addresses a theme/topic that is applicable to students themselves (i.e., societal issues)

Because the books chosen often address societal issues, book selections usually spark some debate.  During my first year, the committee assigned the book Covering: the Hidden Assault on Our Civil Rights.  Two years later, I had the pleasure of co-leading a discussion on Picking Cotton: Our Memoir of Injustice and Redemption.  However, one of the most controversial books chosen was Approaching the Qur’án: The Early Revelations.  Selected for the 2002-2003 academic year, the choice inspired heavy backlash from students, alumni, and the general public as well as a lawsuit from individuals concerned about the University pushing Islam on its students.

From the Summer Reading Program of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Records, #40273, University Archives

From the Summer Reading Program of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Records, #40273, University Archives

Pre-printed postcards were distributed by the Family Policy Network (FPN), a Virginia-based, socially conservative Christian organization. The group, whose chairman, Terry Moffitt, earned his undergraduate degree from UNC-CH in 1981, opposed selection of Approaching the Qur’an for the Summer Reading Program. The FPN said that the suras selected for the book create a false impression of Islam, painting it as a peaceful religion. Moffitt and another leader of the FPN  joined with three UNC freshmen in filing a federal lawsuit arguing that the book choice violated First Amendment guarantees of freedom of religion. A federal judge denied the plaintiffs’ request for an injunction, ruling the University was not forcing students to read the book and was not violating the First Amendment. A federal appeals court panel upheld the lower court ruling. The chancellor’s office received more than 20,000 postcards from throughout the United States.

From the Summer Reading Program of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Records, #40273, University Archives

From the Summer Reading Program of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Records, #40273, University Archives

However, not everyone was opposed to the committee’s book selection.  Students, alumni, and others wrote to Chancellor Moeser to express their support of the school’s decision.  Many of these supporters applauded a choice that would lead to a greater understanding of other cultures and religions in the University.  One student wrote a letter to Chancellor Moeser to assure him that she did not believe the school was attempting to convert its students to Islam.  The student compared the situation to being asked to read about Hitler.  “One does not believe reading about Hitler makes one a Nazi…”

To see all of the Carolina Summer Reading Program’s past choices, you may visit their website. To read more about controversial book choices, you may visit Wilson Library’s online exhibit, A Right to Speak and Hear: Academic Freedom and Free Expression at UNC.

We’d love to hear from students and alumni about your take on this year’s summer reading!  Have you read any of the previous years’ books? 

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Welcome Jennifer Coggins, Records Services Archivist

University Archives and Records Management Services is happy to announce that Jennifer Coggins assumed the position of Records Services Archivist on July 21, 2014. In this position, she will provide guidance to University departments on questions of records management, retention, and disposition; conduct training sessions, and handle transfers to University Archives. She can be reached at (919) 962-6402 or at recman@unc.edu.

 

Jennifer has worked in University Archives for over two years, first as a graduate assistant, and then as Temporary Records Services Archivist. She holds a master’s degree in library science from the UNC School of Information and Library Science (specialization in Archives and Records Management) and a bachelor’s degree in history from Wofford College. She has worked at the Sandor Teszler Library at Wofford College and interned at the National Archives, the Eleanor Roosevelt Papers Project, and the South Carolina Department of Archives and History.

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Building Old West

On this day in 1822, the cornerstone of Old West was laid. The building was finished and in use by July of 1823.

In 1848, additions were made to both Old West and Old East to accommodate the debating societies. Both the original Old West and its additions were built using the labor of  enslaved African-Americans.

The postcard in the gallery above, postmarked 1911 and addressed to “Mr. H.B. Marrow, Raleigh, N.C.”, shows Old West. It reads:

Hello How are you getting on these hot days? I hope you are having a real good time — and be sure and don’t work too much. (?) I am having a fine time this summer. I suppose you will be back before very long now. Mama came home from Va. a few days ago. Sincerely, H.M.P.

For more on the history of UNC buildings, see the exhibit, “Architectural Highlights of Carolina’s Historic Campus.” For more on slavery and the history of UNC, see the Virtual Museum exhibit, “Slavery and the University.”

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“Can you get a date for my roommate? She’s real cute!”

About a year ago, we wrote about restrictions on UNC’s female students in the 1950s and 1960s. Women were often not allowed to travel alone or after certain hours.  While perusing  a fraternity scrapbook from 1951, we found a telegram from a student’s sweetheart referencing these types of rules.

From the Records of the North Carolina Xi of Sigma Alpha Epsilon Fraternity.  SV-40334/1, Scrapbook, 1951-1952.

From the Records of the North Carolina Xi of Sigma Alpha Epsilon Fraternity. SV-40334/1, Scrapbook, 1951-1952.

 

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GOOOOOOAL! Soccer’s illustrious history at UNC

 

From the Department of Athletic Communications Records (#40308), University Archives.

From the Department of Athletic Communications Records (#40308), University Archives.

All eyes are on soccer this summer as countries from around the globe compete in the World Cup, so we thought it would be a good time to take a look at the history of soccer at UNC.

In the 1930s, soccer was offered as an activity in Physical Education classes and as a club sport. Men’s soccer gained varsity status in 1947, and just one year later the team won the Southern Conference title. In 1963, Nigerian student Edwin Okoroma joined the soccer team, becoming the first black varsity athlete at the university. 

Eddie Pope, from the 1994 Yackety Yack, North Carolina Collection.

Eddie Pope, from the 1994 Yackety Yack, North Carolina Collection.

UNC joined the ACC in 1953, and since then the men’s soccer team has won four ACC titles and two NCAA Championships. In 2002, the ACC named its top 50 soccer players in ACC history and included five from UNC: David Smyth, Gregg Berhalter, Eddie Pope, Carey Talley, and Chris Carrieri. Pope played for the US Men’s National Team  in the 1996, 2002, and 2006 World Cups, and Berhalter did so in 1994, 2002, and 2006.

 

Mia Hamm, from the UNC Department of Athletics Records (#40093)

Mia Hamm, from the UNC Department of Athletics Records (#40093)

Women’s soccer gained varsity status in 1979, and has become the most successful athletic program in the university’s history. The team has won 21 national titles, nine of them earned consecutively between 1986 and 1994. In 1992, the team set the NCAA record for uninterrupted wins (58). Twenty-five former or current players—including Mia Hamm, Heather O’Reilly, Kristine Lilly, Tobin Heath, Lorrie Fair, April Heinrichs, and Cat Whitehill—have appeared in the Women’s World Cup either as players or as coaches. UNC women’s soccer coach Anson Dorrance also coached the US women’s national team to victory in the very first Women’s World Cup in 1991.

 

 

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Summer Plans

From the Records of the North Carolina Xi of Sigma Alpha Epsilon Fraternity.  SV-40334/2, Scrapbook, 1954.

A 1954 scrapbook from the Records of the North Carolina Xi Chapter of Sigma Alpha Epsilon Fraternity (SV-40334/2).

This page from a 1954 scrapbook shows members of UNC’s chapter of Sigma Alpha Epsilon fraternity and friends on a trip to the beach.

What are your plans this summer?  Will you be going to the beach?

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New V-Day Carolina Collection

Another new collection at University Archives arrived recently! The V-Day collection from the V-Day Carolina student group contains digital and physical material from 2006 to 2014 related to performances of the Vagina Monologues at UNC in English and Spanish.

FinalBenefitFlyer2013

Flyer for a 2013 V-Day Benefit from the V-Day Carolina Records ( #40431), University Archives.

V-Day Carolina is a chapter of an international organization that works to end violence against girls and women.

Note: The materials referenced in this blog post have not yet been processed and are currently not available to researchers. If you are interested in viewing these materials in person, please contact University Archives before your visit to determine their availability.

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