Monthly Archives: April 2012

10 April 1862: Drawing, “Passing Bridge on Trent River”

Item description: Pencil drawing, dated 10 April 1862, by Herbert Eugene Valentine of Salem, Mass.  Valentine served as a clerk in the U.S. 23rd Massachusetts Infantry Regiment, spending time in New Bern, N.C. Valentine made numerous drawings of the places … Continue reading

Posted in Southern Historical Collection | Tagged , , , , , , , , | Comments Off on 10 April 1862: Drawing, “Passing Bridge on Trent River”

9 April 1862: “The news today from Ten. is not so favorable. Gen’l Beauregard telegraphs that he had fallen back from the river to his original position at Corinth…”

Item description: Entry, dated 9 April 1862, from the diary of Thomas Bragg (Attorney General of the Confederate States of America, 1861-1862). Bragg resigned his cabinet position on 18 March 1862 to return to his home in North Carolina. Bragg … Continue reading

Posted in Southern Historical Collection | Tagged , , , , , , , | Comments Off on 9 April 1862: “The news today from Ten. is not so favorable. Gen’l Beauregard telegraphs that he had fallen back from the river to his original position at Corinth…”

8 April 1862: Cipher from Joseph E. Johnston to Robert E. Lee

Item description: Cipher sent from Gen. Joseph E. Johnston to Gen. Robert E. Lee. The coded message appears to be a note regarding the supply of arms to Johnston’s command, which in April 1862 was engaged in the fortification and … Continue reading

Posted in Southern Historical Collection | Tagged , , , , , | Comments Off on 8 April 1862: Cipher from Joseph E. Johnston to Robert E. Lee

7 April 1862: “How beautifully appropriate is this meaning of the word ‘Shiloh’ to us. It is the Desired, the Longed for. This victory we have been praying!”

Item description: Undated religious tract, “Shiloh: A Sermon,” written by J. Lansing Burrows, a Baptist minister from Richmond, Virginia. Burrows reflects on the meaning of the Battle of Shiloh, a pivotal battle fought on 6-7 April 1862 in southwestern Tennessee. … Continue reading

Posted in Rare Book Collection | Tagged , , , , , , , | Comments Off on 7 April 1862: “How beautifully appropriate is this meaning of the word ‘Shiloh’ to us. It is the Desired, the Longed for. This victory we have been praying!”

6 April 1862: “I was glad she [the CSS Virginia] did not go down, hope that we may have hereafter sufficient respect for the Sabbath not to commence an attack on that day.”

Item description: Rev. Overton Bernard recounts his visits to sick soldiers. Out of respect for the Sabbath, Bernard supports the decision not to to use the CSS Virginia in battle. [Transcription available below image] Item citation: From folder 2 of the … Continue reading

Posted in Southern Historical Collection | Tagged , , | Comments Off on 6 April 1862: “I was glad she [the CSS Virginia] did not go down, hope that we may have hereafter sufficient respect for the Sabbath not to commence an attack on that day.”

5 April 1862: “The rebel steamer ‘Nashville’ running the blockade at Beaufort, North Carolina.”

Item:  “The rebel steamer ‘Nashville’ running the blockade at Beaufort, North Carolina.” Harper’s Weekly, April 5, 1862, p. 209. Citation: “The rebel steamer ‘Nashville’ running the blockade at Beaufort, North Carolina.”  Harper’s Weekly, April 5, 1862, page 209 (illustration).  From … Continue reading

Posted in North Carolina Collection | Tagged , , , , | Comments Off on 5 April 1862: “The rebel steamer ‘Nashville’ running the blockade at Beaufort, North Carolina.”

4 April 1862: “they told hir that may be the yankys would not pay hir she said she did not care if they did not she would wash for them gest as soon as the rhumaties was out of hir arm pay or no pay…”

Item description: Letter written from New Bern, N.C., by Union soldier Jeremiah Stetson to his wife, Abbie F. Stetson. Stetson references his son Edwin Leforrest Stetson (“E”), who was serving with his father, and describes a “negro woman” who did washing for … Continue reading

Posted in Southern Historical Collection | Tagged , , , , | Comments Off on 4 April 1862: “they told hir that may be the yankys would not pay hir she said she did not care if they did not she would wash for them gest as soon as the rhumaties was out of hir arm pay or no pay…”

3 April 1862: “And as for the dear fellow in the cradle_ I can send him no message_ he knows nothing of “Father”_ but when he is old enough tell him of me.”

Item description: Letter, dated 3 April 1862, from Julian C. Ruffin to his wife Charlotte Ruffin. The letter describes Methodist prayer meetings; conflicts over the refusal of Quaker draftees to fight; and common amusements at Entrenched Camp. Ruffin also gives … Continue reading

Posted in Southern Historical Collection | Tagged , , , , , , , | Comments Off on 3 April 1862: “And as for the dear fellow in the cradle_ I can send him no message_ he knows nothing of “Father”_ but when he is old enough tell him of me.”

2 April 1862: “These boats may not be heavily plated, but if fitted as rams they would be very formidable against my slight little craft.”

Item description: Report of Commander Rowan, U. S. Navy, regarding the construction by the enemy of three ironclad gunboats. To read more from the Official Records of the Union and Confederate Navies in the War of the Rebellion, click here. … Continue reading

Posted in North Carolina Collection | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , | Comments Off on 2 April 1862: “These boats may not be heavily plated, but if fitted as rams they would be very formidable against my slight little craft.”

1 April 1862: “The President does things pretty much in his own way, without consulting anyone and takes the responsibility upon himself and has give us a cabinet which is not satisfactory to the country.”

Item description: Letter, Burgess S. Gaither to Thomas Ruffin, 1 April 1862. Gaither, a Burke County, N.C., politician and member of the Confederate Congress wrote of the military disaster in which Roanoke Island was lost and the resulting investigation. He … Continue reading

Posted in Southern Historical Collection | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , | Comments Off on 1 April 1862: “The President does things pretty much in his own way, without consulting anyone and takes the responsibility upon himself and has give us a cabinet which is not satisfactory to the country.”