7 September 1864: “I can never never love you enough”

Item Description: Letter dated 7 September 1864, from Edward Porter Alexander to his wife.

Letter, 13 June 1862, from Edward Porter Alexander to his wife. – See more at: https://blogs.lib.unc.edu/civilwar/index.php/2012/06/13/13-june-1862/#sthash.4tqpprJQ.dpuf
Letter, 13 June 1862, from Edward Porter Alexander to his wife. – See more at: https://blogs.lib.unc.edu/civilwar/index.php/2012/06/13/13-june-1862/#sthash.4tqpprJQ.dpuf

18640907_0118640907_02

Item Citation: From folder 21, Edward Porter Alexander Papers #00007, Southern Historical Collection, Wilson Library, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

Item Transcription:

Petersburg Sept 7th 1864

Your dear letters of the 20th 24th + 27th have all reached me in the last few days my Darling Bessie, + have given me many happy hours in reading + thinking them over even the they took away from me one little hope that I had cherished in my heart very persistently. Poor, poor Darling wife. how I love you + sympathize with you, + what would I not give to tell you of it over + over again until you tired of reading it. When I think of your devotion to me + your generous unselfishness even were it of your life, + of the happiness I have enjoyed with you, I feel my Dear One that I can never never love you enough or do enough to return to you the happiness you have caused me. I was very much relieved to hear that you had received the check, + glad that you liked the photograph. the man who took it asked me for my autograph + when I have it to him he refused to take any pay for it. I am very glad you have taken the dividend- Take it all for it is not worth while to invest anything now + it will save my drawing pay. I was very glad to hear of your presents + feel very grateful to the givers myself for their kindness to you. I know too that the whole family will love you as much as I do when they know you well, + I feel so pleased that you are having the opportunity of knowing them. I feel very sorry about the start of affairs in Richmond but it is one that cant be helped. I haven’t heard from there since I left. I had a present yesterday from Mr. Cameron (who is as generous as he is rich + is always making presents to officers + soldiers) which I wish very much I could turn over to you. It was three bottles of fine old sherry, three ditto Port, one of french Brandy + one of English pickle. He is always after his friends to come to lunch + dinner + salmon, lobster, sardines, cheese, ale to are as plentiful in his house as if there was no war. I called last night on Mrs. Pannell Dick Meadis sister but I think you did not know her. Did I write you word that my old Batten applied to be received into service + known permanently as “Alexander’s Batten.” I consider it a very high compliment. Jim Woolfolk proposed that as S.D. Lee once commanded it it should be named in French + called Le Alexandre Batten. Capt Woolfolk has been exchanged + is in Richmond. This is the 4th letter I’ve written this A.M + I have now got to go out + must stop. Them Yankees still shell town every day. while I’ve been writing a shell popped in a house not a hundred yards off but fortunately hurt no one. Give my warmest love to each of the family. Kiss the dear little ones for me. May God ever bless + keep you all my Darling ones + soon restore us to each other in peace ever prays your loving Husband.

 

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