The New Indentured Class

In 1982, UNC System President Bill Friday wrote suggestions to give before the House Subcommittee on Postsecondary Education.  His suggestions were a response to President Reagan’s proposals to cut student financial aid. One of President Friday’s counterpoints to the proposed … Continue reading

President Bill Friday, 28 July 1977, From the NCC Photographic Archives. Black and White 120 Roll Film, 37875.

President Bill Friday, 28 July 1977, From the NCC Photographic Archives. Black and White 120 Roll Film, 37875.

In 1982, UNC System President Bill Friday wrote suggestions to give before the House Subcommittee on Postsecondary Education.  His suggestions were a response to President Reagan’s proposals to cut student financial aid. One of President Friday’s counterpoints to the proposed budget cuts follows.

“Transferring an increasing level of the cost of education from society to the current user of education services will create a new indentured class of individuals who may have borrowed more heavily for their education than their future earning power can accommodate.” 

President Friday's defense of his address to the subcommittee. From folder 1846, Box 50 of the Records of the Office of the President: William Friday, Collection 40009.

President Friday’s defense of his address to the subcommittee. From folder 1846, Box 50 of the Records of the Office of the President: William Friday, Collection 40009.

 

For many students, President Friday’s prediction of an indentured servitude may be becoming a reality. The Condition of Education 2013 was recently released by the Department of Education and the National Center for Education Statistics.  According to this report: “In 2010–11, the average student loan amount, in constant 2011–12 dollars, was $6,800, which was a 39 percent increase from 2000–01, when the average student loan amount was $4,900. Of the 4.1 million students who entered the repayment phase on their student loans in fiscal year (FY) 2010, some 375,000, or 9 percent, had defaulted before FY 2011.”  See the full report here.

What are your thoughts on student loans, student debt, and financial aid?

An exhibit on President Friday, “Bill Friday: In His Own Words,” will go on display in the Wilson Library on October 8th. The exhibit celebrates President Friday’s life of impact on the University, the State, and the Nation. You can also view an online exhibit The Legacy of William C. Friday in The Carolina Story: A Virtual Museum of University History.

UNC Adds 18th Institution to System: Geometrodynamics University?

Many of the legal issues faced by the UNC General Administration are no laughing matter, but sometimes they do make for some interesting, even humorous, correspondence. North Carolina law mandates that UNC system institutions receive a license from UNC’s Board … Continue reading

Many of the legal issues faced by the UNC General Administration are no laughing matter, but sometimes they do make for some interesting, even humorous, correspondence.

North Carolina law mandates that UNC system institutions receive a license from UNC’s Board of Governors to confer degrees. Because of this, General Administration has found itself playing watchdog when institutions have 1) claimed to be constituents of the university system, or 2) have come under suspicion of being a degree mill.

In this 1984 letter, the former associate vice president of  student services and special programs at UNC General Administration takes a rather serious tone against the founder of “Geometrodynamics University” for awarding himself a doctorate degree in quantum mechanics:

From the unprocessed backlog of General Administration's Legal Affairs Division, #40015, University Archives.

From the unprocessed backlog of General Administration’s Legal Affairs Division, #40015, University Archives.

This is just a relatively lighthearted example of an issue that UNC General Administration has to deal with;  many more examples of similar, and more serious interactions can be found in the archives.

Silent Sam Turns 100

This Sunday, June 2, 2013, the Confederate Memorial, better known as Silent Sam, turns 100 years old.    The statue was dedicated with great fanfare and celebration a hundred years ago on June 2, 1913.  Over the recent decades, Silent Sam … Continue reading

This Sunday, June 2, 2013, the Confederate Memorial, better known as Silent Sam, turns 100 years old.    The statue was dedicated with great fanfare and celebration a hundred years ago on June 2, 1913.  Over the recent decades, Silent Sam has become a symbol of controversy, caught between those that believe that it is an enduring symbol of racism and white supremacy and defenders who contend that it is a memorial to those UNC students who died and fought for the Confederate States of America. Could it be both?

Below are digital copies of some documents from the dedication and about UNC’s involvement in the statue’s erection.  Read the text and decide.

Page from Julian S. Carr's dedication speech, June 2, 1913

Page from Julian S. Carr’s dedication speech, June 2, 1913

The next page of Carr's dedication speech

The next page of Carr’s dedication speech

Letter from UNC President Francis P. Venable regarding the design of the Confederate Memorial ("Silent Sam"), February 25, 1910

Letter from UNC President Francis P. Venable regarding the design of the Confederate Memorial (“Silent Sam”), February 25, 1910

1990s Restroom Policy Reinstated

Please carefully read the original policy to ensure you are prepared for upcoming changes.                                 April Fools!    

Please carefully read the original policy to ensure you are prepared for upcoming changes.

Updated restroom policy from 1990. (From the Office of the Director of Athletics Records, 40093, University Archives.)

Original restroom policy from 1990. (From the Office of the Director of Athletics Records, #40093, University Archives.)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

April Fools!

 

 

The Flu Pandemic of 1918-1919 at UNC

In the fall of 1918, students were preparing for battle. In August, Congress had lowered the draft age from 21 to 18, and as part of the Student Army Training Corps (SATC), students  drilled daily, anticipating the day that their … Continue reading

Letter from parent J.L. Nelson

A parent asks to be notified by telegram if his son catches the flu (University of North Carolina Papers, #40005, University Archives).

In the fall of 1918, students were preparing for battle. In August, Congress had lowered the draft age from 21 to 18, and as part of the Student Army Training Corps (SATC), students  drilled daily, anticipating the day that their numbers would be called. However, before they could be sent to fight in Europe, they found themselves fighting a deadly enemy on their own campus—influenza.

The first wave of the global “Spanish Flu” pandemic began in the spring, followed by a much deadlier second wave in the early fall. By September 1918, it had spread to North Carolina. Concerned parents wrote to university president Edward Kidder Graham, fearful for their children’s health.

Graham's response to a concerned parent

Graham’s response to a concerned parent (University of North Carolina Papers, #40005, University Archives).

The campus was quarantined in October, and second-year medical students and local nurses were recruited to work in the overflowing infirmary. Three students died in a span of less than two weeks, and on University Day, 1918, no public gathering was held. After a few weeks, the situation seemed to be improving. In an October 19th letter to a parent, President Graham noted that there were 30 students in the infirmary and 20 convalescing—significantly fewer than the nearly 130 hospitalized a week before.

However, just two days later President Graham himself fell ill. Within days, he developed pneumonia as a complication of influenza. As the campus grew concerned about his condition and hoped for his recovery, the SATC commander asked that students not disturb Graham by marching or performing drills near his house. After less than a week’s illness, Graham died.

Portrait of Edward Kidder Graham

A memorial to President Graham printed as a frontispiece to the Dec. 25, 1918 High School Journal(Edward Kidder Graham Papers, #00282, Southern Historical Collection).

The next day, all classes and military drills were cancelled, and students were asked to “demean themselves in a quiet manner” in respect for the president. On October 31, Dean Marvin Stacy was appointed chairman of the faculty and assumed leadership of the university. Over the next two months, the war ended, the SATC disbanded, and the health crisis began to wane. However, influenza remained a serious threat. In January, 1919, Stacy also died of pneumonia as a complication of influenza, just less than three months after the death of his predecessor by the same illness.

By the spring, the global pandemic was ending. Over the course of the epidemic on campus, over 500 were treated for influenza in the infirmary and six died—students William Bunting, Larry Templeton, and Kenneth Scott; nurse Bessie Roper; President Graham; Mrs. W.J. Hannah, a mother who caught the disease while caring for her son; and Dean Stacy.