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Archive for July, 2014

“At the very least, we can definitively trace the term to 1937, when it was used in a popular song. It is likely that Cackalacky’s etymology runs much deeper, however…. “It may have arisen from a kind of sound-play utterance used to refer to the rural ways of people from Carolina — a play on […]

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Francis J. Hale, co-founder of the UNC Parachute Club, recently dropped in with July’s Artifacts of the Month. Hale, Class of 1973, organized the Club in 1969 with fellow student Bob Bolch. Not surprisingly, the University did not easily warm to the idea of its students jumping out of airplanes. Hale recalls “The athletic department […]

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“I’d spent most of the day in the archives of the Southern Folklife Collection at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, where a patient young archivist named Aaron Smithers had played me a stack of Blind Blake 78s…. “Despite most [78 rpm record] collectors’ contentious relationship with academia and with archives in particular, […]

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Several new titles just added to “New in the North Carolina Collection.” To see the full list simply click on the link in the entry or click on the “New in the North Carolina Collection” tab at the top of the page. As always, full citations for all the new titles can be found in […]

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French Omelet from Cook book. Oven Omelet from The Charlotte cookbook. Spinach Mushroom Omelet from Pass the plate : the collection from Christ Church. Shrimp Omelet from Tarheels cooking for Ronald’s kids. Omelet au Natural (Plain Omelet) from Waldensian cookery. Western Omelet from What’s cook’n at Biltmore. Cheese Zucchini Omelet from What’s left is right […]

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“Ringgold, Ga., has a mayor who’s one generation removed from the Civil War. “Joe Barger’s grandfather — that’s right, his grandfather — Jacob A. Barger served as a private for the South in North Carolina’s infantry. Mayor Barger grew up in Salisbury, N.C., about 35 miles north of Charlotte. ” ‘He was born in 1833,’ […]

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“If you have any oyster shells lying around, the U.S. Army wants five dumptrucks’ worth. You don’t even have to include the delicious oysters inside. And they’re willing to pay up to $15,000 for them. “That’s the gist of one of the stranger U.S. Army Corps of Engineers contracts in recent memory. Last week, the […]

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On this day in 1836: A new element appears in North Carolinians’ celebration of the Fourth of July — the “occasional popping of squibs,” as the Tarboro Free Press refers to firecrackers.  

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American Lasagna from A Taste of the old and the new. All-American Hamburgers from The Family circle cookbook. Early American Casserole from Favorite recipes of the Carolinas : meats edition, including poultry and seafood. Martha Washington Creams from Nightingales in the kitchen. American Raised Waffles from Keepers of the hearth : based on records, ledgers […]

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“On February 18 [1915] Wilson and his daughters and his Cabinet gathered in the East Room for the first running of a motion picture in the White House  [“The Clansman,” later retitled “The Birth of a Nation.”] ” ‘It was like writing history with lightning. And my only regret is that it is all so […]

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