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Archive for September, 2014

To make a good coffee from Keepers of the hearth : based on records, ledgers and shared recipes of the families connected with Mill Prong House, Edinborough Road, Hoke County, North Carolina. How to spice up coffee from Pass the plate : the collection from Christ Church. Cafe Brulot from High Hampton hospitality. Aunt Irene’s […]

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Although television ads for the U.S. Senate race have been at saturation level since early summer, the traditional campaign season started just this month. Before long our mailboxes will be filled with postcards, letters, and flyers touting or demonizing one candidate or another. You may not love this, but we in the North Carolina Collection […]

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“In the eyes of some, passenger pigeon parts [beyond the feathers used for stuffing pillows and beds] held one more valuable property: medicinal. “Dr. John Brickell, writing on the natural history of North Carolina in 1737, stated that the blood was effective in the treatment of the eyes and, when swallowed, ‘cures bloody fluxes.’ “He […]

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Fall recipes for the new season.

Switchel or Harvest Drink from The Progressive farmer’s southern cookbook. Autumn Apple French Toast from North Carolina bed & breakfast cookbook. Fall Cookies from Cooking on the cutting edge. Harvest Fruit Mold from The Junior Service League’s Chapel Hill cook book : tried and tested recipes. Harvest Skillet Pork Chops from The Family circle cookbook. […]

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On this day in 1865: The Raleigh Daily Standard reports on what may be the state’s first road gang, organized under the military government immediately following the Civil War: “The military on yesterday picked up a large number of gentlemen of color, who were loitering about the street corners, apparently much depressed by ennui and […]

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Q: You’ve lived in New York over 17 years, but I understand you’re from a small town in North Carolina. Was that a difficult transition? A: It’s impossible for people who grow up within the orbit of large cities to fully understand how alien and incredible and impossible and overwhelming a place they appear to […]

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“First, half a grapefruit. Cereal — Cream of Wheat. One poached egg on whole wheat toast. No bacon. And coffee, no cream, no sugar.” — Retired headwaiter Chauncey Mann, having no trouble recalling in 1980 the breakfast ordered by Eleanor Roosevelt at the Hotel Charlotte in 1940. The First Lady was staying overnight after a […]

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In honor of Talk Like a Pirate day, we bring you the The Sturdy Beggar Fantastic Ship’s Bar.  This postcard ca. 1940-1969 from the Durwood Barbour Collection of North Carolina Postcards reads: “Sturdy Beggar Fantastic Ship’s Bar Located in the Charcoal Hearth Restaurant at the Holiday Inn is the South’s most beautiful Lounge. Visit the […]

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“Bunkum” As A Superlative

In searching through Newspapers.com for early uses the word “bunkum,” one of our state’s greatest (perhaps the greatest?) contributions to the English language, I found an interesting article from the Philadelphia World reprinted in the Asheboro Southern Citizen of July 26, 1839. Regular readers of our “This Month in North Carolina History” series remember that […]

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“On 1902, a shoeless boy from the Great Smoky Mountains stood before the dean at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine…..His name was John Romulus Brinkley, he was 17 years old, and he wanted to be a doctor. The dean surveyed the boy and cruelly laughed. He said the boy had better run on home […]

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