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Archive for July, 2015

“Serving as North Carolina’s attorney general in 1780, [James] Iredell complained to his wife about the work of North Carolina’s lawmakers, calling it ‘the vilest collection of trash ever formed by a legislative body.’ ” — From “The Will of the People: How Public Opinion Has Influenced the Supreme Court and Shaped the Meaning of […]

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On this day in 1925: During a session in New York City, Charlie Poole and his North Carolina Ramblers record their most popular number. At a time when Columbia’s typical country record sells 5,000 copies, “Don’t Let Your Deal Go Down Blues” will sell more than 100,000. Poole, a native of Randolph County, is a […]

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On this day in 1948: Southerners who have bolted the Democratic Party over its civil rights platform meet in Atlanta and christen themselves “States’ Rights Democrats.” The unwieldy name proves a problem for Charlotte News headline writer Bill Weisner. His solution: “Dixiecrats.” Presidential candidate Strom Thurmond of South Carolina dislikes the label and considers it […]

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Several new titles just added to “New in the North Carolina Collection.” To see the full list simply click on the link in the entry or click on the “New in the North Carolina Collection” tab at the top of the page. As always, full citations for all the new titles can be found in […]

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“There are still 10 Army bases in the United States named for Confederate generals, and military officials have no plans to change the names…. “One [such] ‘fort’ might (but probably won’t) be undergoing a name-change soon: Fort Bragg, a coastal city in Mendocino County, California, which was founded as a military garrison in 1857. “Like Fort Bragg […]

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“North Carolina’s Senator Josiah Bailey, who voted against the Federal Emergency Relief Act and the National Recovery Administration in 1933, publicly worried about the burden on his poor state to meet the act’s one-third matching funds requirement…. “When the act passed, $40 million was distributed over three years in the state for public projects and […]

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Because gelatin molds are always a conversation starter. Limey Cucumber Salad from Classic cookbook. Date-Grapefruit Globes from Carolina cooking. Fantastic Shrimp Mold from Count our blessings : 75 years of recipes and memories / Myers Park Presbyterian Church. Ham Mousse from Marion Brown’s southern cook book. Mayonnaise Ring from Soup to nuts : a cook […]

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In colonial North Carolina, paper money didn’t have the strong institutional backing it does today, and it was remarkably easy to counterfeit. Our July Artifact of the Month is a paper note from 1729 with a value of forty shillings… But was it real? The preferred money of the time was coins of silver, gold, […]

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“In the years after Harper Lee published To Kill a Mockingbird in 1960, the beloved, moral patriarch Atticus Finch became a cultural icon. Some people were inspired to become lawyers because of Atticus. And some named their children after him…. So how do parents who named their kids Atticus feel [now]?… “[When] John Edgerton and his wife […]

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“As punishment for losing civil wars go, the South got pretty lucky. It got to honor its military leaders with bronze statues. It got to name its streets and schools after Confederate leaders. It even got to keep symbols of the war, like the suddenly at-issue Confederate flag. ” ‘The Southern losers were treated with extraordinary leniency,’ said […]

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