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Archive for March, 2017

“The gathering [at Harvard], which featured a keynote address by Ta-Nehisi Coates, drew an overflow crowd of about 500, including researchers from more than 30 campuses. Between sessions… one scholar was overheard saying that ‘something we’ve been talking about for 200 years has suddenly become urgent.’ “Alfred L. Brophy, a legal historian at the University […]

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“When [Michael Jordan] made his way into the NBA [in 1984], he wanted to keep his college experience close by….But Jordan’s UNC short shorts wouldn’t fit under his Chicago Bulls short shorts, so he had to wear baggy, knee-length Bulls shorts instead…. “Soon, these extra long shorts became the favored style.  By 2003, almost every […]

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During WWII, keeping up morale for American soldiers was a major national concern. The Library Section of the U.S. War Department, and later an organization called the Council on Books in Wartime, figured out a way to print contemporary titles inexpensively in a small paperback format that would also be easy to carry. The books […]

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On this day in 1865: George W. Nichols, a major in Sherman’s army, writing in his journal in Laurel Hill, N.C.: “The line which divides South and North Carolina was passed by the army this morning. . . . The real difference between the two regions lies in the fact that the plantation owners [in […]

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On this day in 1712: After nearly a month of fighting near present-day Grifton, colonial forces persuade the Tuscarora to agree to a truce and peace treaty. The war starts anew, however, when Col. John Barnwell begins selling Indian prisoners as slaves.

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“In 2013, we did a dinner at Stagville Plantation in Durham, 150 people. I did invite Paula Deen, [but] she didn’t show up after my infamous letter to her…. “Almost all the food was prepared 19th Century style, open fires, cast iron skillets, wooden utensils. As we sat down to eat in the shadows of […]

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Several new titles just added to “New in the North Carolina Collection.” To see the full list simply click on the link in the entry or click on the “New in the North Carolina Collection” tab at the top of the page. As always, full citations for all the new titles can be found in […]

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Pickles and Relishes from The Progressive farmer’s southern cookbook. Fig Pickles from Capital city cook book : a collection of practical tested receipts. Pickled Shrimp from Dixie dishes. Squash Pickles from What’s cookin’? in 1822. Cantaloupe Pickles from The Progressive farmer’s southern cookbook. Artichoke Pickles from Favorite recipes of the Lower Cape Fear. Watermelon Rind […]

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“I Am Not Your Negro begins with [James Baldwin‘s] return to the U.S. in 1957 after living in France for almost a decade — a return prompted by seeing a photograph of 15-year-old Dorothy Counts and the violent white mob that surrounded her as she entered and desegregated Harding High School in Charlotte, North Carolina. […]

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