Holiday in the stacks: Doodily-doo edition

TR-12_245_Ralph Emery Show, 12_24_1971_Eugene Earle Collection One more tasty holiday treat from the Southern Folklife Collection. From the Eugene Earle Collection (20376), we have Del Reeves doodling’ away at his tune “Santa’s Boy.” This track appeared on transcription disc recording of the Ralph Emery Show, originally aired on Christmas Eve, 1971, call number TR-12-245.

Doodily-do everybody. We’ll see you next year.
TR_12_245

Transcription Disc TR/12-245

Ralph Emery Show No. 1184, 24 December 1971. Special Guest: Sonny James.

“Jingle Bells,” Roy Rogers and Dale Evans.
“Only Love Can Break a Heart,” Sonny James.
“Blue Christmas,” Elvis Presley.
“Kentucky,” Sammi Smith.
“Rudolph the Red Nosed Reindeer,” Gene Autry.
“I Heard the Bells on Christmas Day,” Ray Price.
“Santa’s Boy,” Del Reeves.
“Do You Hear What I Hear,” Sonny James.
“One’s on the Way,” Loretta Lynn.
“Here Was a Man,” Johnny Cash.
“Baby’s Smile, Woman’s Kiss,” Johnny Duncan.
“Silent Night,” Sonny James.

Holiday in the Stacks: Goldband edition

20245_pf0576_0002_Goldband Recording Corporation Collection (20245)
small_cfg More holiday tunes from the Southern Folklife Collection. This time from the great Rockin’ Sidney, master tape FT-6771 in the Goldband Recording Corporation Collection (20245). This tape was preserved in the Rivers Studio as part of a current Southern Folklife Collection digitization project, From the Piedmont to the Swamplands: Preserving Southern Traditional Music, funded by a grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities.
The legendary Count Rockin’ Sidney and the Dukes recorded well over 50 zydeco flavored R&B tracks for Shuler’s Goldband Records in the 1960s and 1970s, including this tight grooved holiday jam. From Count Rockin’ Sidney and the Southern Folklife Collection, may your X-mas be a “Soul Christmas” FT6771 SOUL XMASFT6771 back

Rivers Dispatch: Christmas in Clarksdale (in June)

Wade Walton, Dockery Farms (ABP-15 #26)_William R. Ferris Collection_20367We’re starting our holiday party in the stacks early this year with a track from the William R. Ferris Collection (20367). This tape, call no. FT-10407, was preserved in the Rivers Studio as part of a current Southern Folklife Collection digitization project, From the Piedmont to the Swamplands: Preserving Southern Traditional Music, funded by a grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities.
Folklorist Bill Ferris celebrated Christmas in the summertime at Wade Walton’s barber shop in Clarksdale, Mississippi (pictured above). One of the patrons played a lively version of “Silent Night” before getting his hair cut. We’re not sure if the smoking monkey was involved, but one can hope. Happy holidays from the Southern Folklife Collection.
FT10407 SN HARPFT10407_William R. Ferris Collection_20367

Noble Ray Price, the Cherokee Cowboy

P3910_Standing from left to right: KBBQ disc jockey Hugh Jarrett, musicians Ray Price and Tex Williams, and tailor Nudie Cohn. The four are backstage at the KBBQ First Anniversary Show_Southern Folklife Collection Radio and Television Files (30015)P3910. Standing from left to right: KBBQ disc jockey Hugh Jarrett, musicians Ray Price and Tex Williams, and tailor Nudie Cohn. The four are backstage at the KBBQ First Anniversary Show. Southern Folklife Collection Radio and Television Files (30015).

Country legend, Ray Price died this week at his home in Texas at the age of 87. The “Ray Price Shuffle,” a 4/4 beat developed by the Cherokee Cowboy himself remains a staple of the honky tonk sound. Combined with his velvet voice and countrypolitan ballads, Price changed the sound of Nashville. We picked out a few items from the Southern Folklife Collection to share in remembrance of Price and his lasting legacy. The photo above, P3910 from the Southern Folklife Collection Radio and Television Files (30015) features Price along with one of his great friends, fashion designer Nudie Cohn. Price could often be found on stage wearing one of Cohn’s “Nudie Suits.”  Price’s visual style remained impeccable throughout his career, but it was always his voice that separated him from the rest of the crooners. Listen to his great rendition of the Harlan Howard tune, “Heartache by the Numbers” from call no. 45-1472. 45_1472_Heartache_by_the_numbers_Ray_Price_SFC
45_1472_Ray Price_Southern Folklife CollectionAnother classic from Price’s massive catalog is his hit, “Take Me As I Am (or let me go). This Don Law produced single has the full “Nashville Sound,” a full orchestra and choral arrangement to back Price’s powerful voice and make the syrupy lyrics wonderfully bittersweet. We found a unique promotional flier for the song in the Southern Folklife Collection Artist Name Files (30005), NF1596. These items are but a blip in Price’s 65 year career. We’d love to show you more but you’ll have to make a visit to Wilson Library. For now, let’s sit back and enjoy one more song.45_1858_Take_me_as_I_am_Ray_Price_SFC
NF1596_Ray Price_Southern Folklife Collection Artist Name Files (30005)45_1858_Ray Price_Southern Folklife Collection