Cataloger's Corner: Barns

Our Photos of the Week this time feature 2 examples of tobacco barns taken from the CD-ROM companion to John Michael Vlach’s 2003 book Barns (Norton/Library of Congress). The book and accompanying disc feature black & white photos of barns across the U.S., taken by a variety of photographers, and currently housed the Prints & Photographs Division of the Library of Congress.

Air-cured tobacco barn, Lexington, KY. Marion Wolcott, 1940. (From Library of Congress Prints & Photographs Division)
Air-cured tobacco barn, Lexington, KY. Marion Wolcott, 1940. (From Library of Congress Prints & Photographs Division)

The photo above shows an air-cured tobacco barn in Lexington, KY and was taken in 1940 by Marion Wolcott. The one below shows a flue-cured tobacco barn (with advertising for Lucky Strike) near Gordonton in Person County, NC. It was taken by Dorothea Lange in 1939.
Flue-cured tobacco barn, Person County, NC. Dorothea Lange, 1939. From the Prints & Photographs Division of the Library of Congress.
Flue-cured tobacco barn, Person County, NC. Dorothea Lange, 1939. From the Prints & Photographs Division of the Library of Congress.

The Barns CD-ROM is now available at the Southern Folklife Collection as call # CD-11794.

I want to dance in Lafayette

We love hearing from our students about their work in the Southern Folklife Collection as they explore our holdings and find artifacts of expressive cultures they are often experiencing for the very first time. In this post we hear again from SFC student Zach Gossett. Enjoy.
78_3435_005Pulling this Columbia disc out of stacks and putting it on the turntable definitely was my first experience with the excitement, the intrigue, and the joy that no doubt inspires record enthusiasts and collectors; this was a piece of history in my hands, the first commercial Cajun recording. While researching another Cajun artist, fiddle player Rufus Thibodeaux, I briefly searched “Allons à Lafayette” from his record Cajun Fiddle (FC1111). Not only did I discover who originally recorded the tune, but also that we had a copy of that recording on 78 rpm disc.
Accordion player Joe Falcon and guitarist (and future wife) Cleoma Breaux recorded “Lafayette (Allon a Luafette)” on April 17, 1928. The many Cajun song-titles bearing “Waltz (Valse)”, “Dance”, or “Two-Step”, emphasize danceability of Cajun music as integral to the style. “Allon a Luafette”, as it appears written undoubtedly in a French dialect, is a (Cajun?) two-step. I’ve never danced it, but I feel an unwavering rhythmic drive. I enjoy it, so much.
Joe Falcon and Cleoma Breaux: “Lafeyette”
We have the 78, call number 78-3435 here at the Southern Folklife Collection. There is a lovely waltz on the other side.
 

78 of the week: Ida Cox and Lovie Austin on Paramount

78_11107_Kentucky_Man_Blues_Southern Folklife Collection, UNC Chapel HillSorry to be so quiet around here lately. Summer in Chapel Hill may be quiet, but activity at Wilson Library intensifies as the temperature goes up. We’ve got exciting news about the SFC 25 year anniversary coming up so stay tuned to Field Trip South over the next few days. You’re going to love it.
78_11107_Death_Letter_Blues_Southern Folklife Collection, UNC Chapel HillBut for this afternoon, to ease back into blogging this week I thought we could start slow with call no. 78-11107 by the remarkable Ida Cox accompanied by the one and only Lovie Austin. “Death Letter Blues” and “Kentucky Man Blues” are but two of 78 sides Cox recorded for Paramount between 1923 and 1929. Enjoy these segments, presented with no noise reduction or post-processing. Love the sound.78_11107_Ida_Cox_Death_Letter_Blues 78_11107_Ida_Cox_Kentucky_Man_Blues