Category Archives: Activism

What is a Charrette?

A charrette is a focus group that brings together a wide variety of stakeholders in order to map solutions. Originally used in the Public Health field, our CDA Team and others have borrowed the term for community and cultural heritage … Continue reading

Posted in Activism, African American, Archival Work, Art/Artists, Business, Civil Rights, Community Archives, Education, Events, Family, grants, Labor, Links, Living History, Music, Personal archives, Politics, Race Relations, SHC Programs, Southern Culture, Subjects, Women | Leave a comment

What is a Community?

Here at CDA, our team speaks about communities a lot, working to imagine and redefine what that word implies. But what exactly do we mean when we say a Community? That question seems straightforward but there is a great deal … Continue reading

Posted in Activism, African American, Archival Work, Art/Artists, Civil Rights, Civil War, Collections, Community Archives, Family, grants, Labor, Living History, Personal archives, Politics, Race Relations, SHC Programs, Slavery, Southern Culture, Uncategorized, Women | Leave a comment

PROJECT SPOTLIGHT: EKAAMP

Bernetiae Reed, CDAT Project Documentarian and Oral Historian, reflects on her participation in the Eastern Kentucky Social Club (EKSC) Reunion and exhibit by Dr. Karida Brown of EKAAMP in St. Louis, Missouri. Time was a blur as I traveled to … Continue reading

Posted in Activism, African American, Archival Work, Art/Artists, Collections, Community Archives, Events, Exhibitions, Family, grants, Labor, Living History, Music, Personal archives, Race Relations, SHC Programs, Southern Culture, Uncategorized, Women, Writers | Leave a comment

What is a Community Archive?

Community archives and other community-centric history, heritage, and memory projects work to empower communities to tell, protect, and share their history on their terms. In 2017, the Southern Historical Collection, a part of Wilson Library Special Collections, within UNC Libraries … Continue reading

Posted in Activism, African American, Archival Work, Civil Rights, Collections, Community Archives, Education, Exhibitions, Family, grants, Labor, Music, Politics, Race Relations, SHC In the News, SHC Programs, Southern Culture, University of North Carolina, Women | Leave a comment

Community-Driven Archives

Hello and welcome to the Community-Driven Archive blog located on UNC-Chapel Hill Library’s site Southern Sources! On this blog, we, the Community-Driven Archives Team or CDAT for short, will talk about the work you see (like the “AiaB” Archivist in a Backpack) and … Continue reading

Posted in Activism, African American, Community Archives, Family, SHC Programs, Southern Culture, University of North Carolina | Leave a comment

LGBTQ Political Pioneer Joe Herzenberg

 “What was hope yesterday morning is now life for me” Thanks to “The State of Things” on WUNC (North Carolina Public Radio) for inspiring today’s post with their conversation (also on Twitter) about the experiences of LGBTQ elected officials in North Carolina. … Continue reading

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Archiving the Women’s March

Like many other repositories, the Southern Historical Collection is interested in collecting information about recent local protests in response to national events. We are partnering with the North Carolina Collection to make this happen for the Women’s March that took … Continue reading

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New Collections: Love Letters

We have a number of new collections that are preserved, processed, and now available for research. Love and war were in the air, as the bulk of the materials include courtship correspondence and letters written by people while they were … Continue reading

Posted in Activism, Business, Civil War, Collections, Digital SHC, Family, Finding Aids, Journalism, New Collections, Politics, Race Relations, Revised Collections, War, Women | Leave a comment