Women's History Month + new books display, part 1

Last week, we posted a list of new book titles currently on display near the library entrance.  Today and next week, we’ll be highlighting our in-library display, which this month features new arrivals related to women’s history across a variety of genres and topics.

March is Women’s History Month and this year’s theme is “our history is our strength.”  What better way to learn more about women’s history, achievements, and current challenges than turning to some more of the Stone Center Library’s new acquisitions?  Come check us out!

New arrivals at the Stone Center Library

To those of you returning to campus from spring break, welcome back!  Here at the Library, it’s the season for new books – lots and lots of recent acquisitions spanning a variety of disciplines and genres.

For instance, if you’ve been to the library recently, you may have noticed our updated display:

picture of library display case

Here’s a closer look at some of our current highlights:

In the shadow of slavery : Africa’s botanical legacy in the Atlantic world (Judith A. Carney and Richard Nicholas Rosomoff).

  • “In this exciting, original, and groundbreaking book, Judith A. Carney and Richard Nicholas Rosomoff draw on archaeological records, oral histories, and the accounts of slave ship captains to show how slaves’ food plots-‘botanical gardens of the dispossessed’-became the incubators of African survival in the Americas and Africanized the foodways of plantation societies.”

The other side of paradise : a memoir (Staceyann Chin).

  • “From the iconic and charismatic star of ‘Russell Simmons’ Def Poetry Jam’ comes this brave and fiercely candid memoir about growing up in Jamaica by performer, activist, and writer Chin.”

The road to someplace better : from the segregated South to Harvard Business School and beyond. (Lillian Lincoln Lambert with Rosemary Brutico).

  • “Inspiring memoir of a groundbreaking business pioneer who broke down racial, gender, and social barriers to achieve unprecedented success. Lillian Lincoln Lambert received Harvard Business School’s Alumni Achievement Award in 2003 and has been featured on Good Morning America and in Time, the Washington Post, and Entrepreneur.”

The immortal life of Henrietta Lacks. (Rebecca Skloot).

  • “Her name was Henrietta Lacks, but scientists know her as HeLa. She was a poor Southern tobacco farmer who worked the same land as her slave ancestors, yet her cells-taken without her knowledge-became one of the most important tools in medicine.”

Til death or distance do us part : marriage and the making of African America (Frances Smith Foster).

  • “Conventional wisdom tells us that marriage was illegal for African Americans during the antebellum era, and that if people married at all, their vows were tenuous ones: ‘until death or distance do us part.’ Drawing on a trove of less well-known sources including family histories, folk stories, memoirs, sermons, and especially the fascinating writings from the Afro-Protestant Press, ‘Til Death or Distance Do Us Part offers a radically different perspective on antebellum love and family life.”

Caribbean middlebrow : leisure culture and the middle class (Belinda Edmondson).

  • “Edmondson (English and African American and African studies, Rutgers U.-Newark) tells the story of leisure culture in the Anglophone Caribbean for the past 150 years as a story of the nascent and aspiring black middle class striving to reconcile their origins in black-identified culture, with aspirations for social ascendance and international recognition.”

The literature police : apartheid censorship and its cultural consequences (Peter D. McDonald).

  • “The Literature Police affords a unique perspective on one of the most anachronistic, exploitative, and racist modern states of the post-war era, and on some of the many forms of cultural resistance it inspired. It also raises urgent questions about how we understand the category of the literary in today’s globalized, intercultural world.”

My Times in black and white : race and power at the New York times (Gerald M. Boyd ; afterword by Robin D. Stone).

  • “A rare inside view of power and behind-the-scenes politics at the nation’s premier newspaper, My Times in Black and White is the inspirational tale of a man who rose from urban poverty to the top of his field, struggling against whitedominated media, tearing down racial barriers, and all the while documenting the most extraordinary events of the latter twentieth century.”

Look and leave : photographs and stories from New Orleans’s Lower Ninth Ward (Jane Fulton Alt ; introduction by Michael A. Weinstein).

  • “As a participant in New Orleans’s “Look and Leave” program, Jane Fulton Alt accompanied Lower Ninth Ward residents back to their homes for the first time since fleeing Hurricane Katrina. It is through Alt’s social worker’s compassion and keen photographer’s eye that we are given a better understanding of what it meant to be a resident of the Lower Ninth Ward of New Orleans immediately following Hurricane Katrina.”

Examining Tuskegee : the infamous syphilis study and its legacy (Susan M. Reverby).

  • “The forty-year “Tuskegee” Syphilis Study has become the American metaphor for medical racism, government malfeasance, and physician arrogance. The subject of histories, films, rumors, and political slogans, it received an official federal apology from President Bill Clinton in a White House ceremony. Susan M. Reverby offers a comprehensive analysis of the notorious study of untreated syphilis, which took place in and around Tuskegee, Alabama, from the 1930s through the 1970s.”

The warmth of other suns : the epic story of America’s great migration (Isabel Wilkerson).

  • “In this epic, beautifully written masterwork, Pulitzer Prize-winning author Isabel Wilkerson chronicles one of the great untold stories of American history: the decades-long migration of black citizens who fled the South for northern and western cities, in search of a better life.”

Gridiron gauntlet : the story of the men who integrated pro football in their own words (Andy Piascik).

  • “One year before Jackie Robinson broke the color line in major league baseball, four black players joined the Cleveland Browns and Los Angeles Rams to become the first African-American pro football players in the modern era. Players who began their careers from 1946 to 1955 reminisce about the violence they faced on and off the field, the world of segregation and the violence it brought, but also of white players and coaches who assisted and supported their careers.”

Dark days, bright nights : from Black power to Barack Obama (Peniel E. Joseph).

  • “The Civil Rights Movement is now remembered as a long-lost era, which came to an end along with the idealism of the 1960s. In Dark Days, Bright Nights, acclaimed scholar Peniel E. Joseph puts this pat assessment to the test, showing the 60s—particularly the tumultuous period after the passage of the 1965 Voting Rights Act—to be the catalyst of a movement that culminated in the inauguration of Barack Obama.”

Airlift to America : how Barack Obama, Sr., John F. Kennedy, Tom Mboya, and 800 East African students changed their world and ours (Tom Shachtman).

  • “This long-hidden saga reveals how a handful of Americans and Kenyans fought the British colonial government, the U.S. State Department, and segregation to send nearly 800 young East African men and women to U.S. universities–many of whom would go on to change the world.”

 

Interested in any of these titles?  Click on the links above to check their availability online or come by the Stone Center Library, where you can also peruse our additional display of new books (in the back, by the periodicals).  Happy reading!

February 25, 1870: Hiram Revels sworn in as first African American U.S. Senator

Did you know?  On this day in 1870, Fayetteville-born Hiram Revels became the first African American to serve in the U.S. Senate.
Revels (1827-1901) trained as a minister and served the U.S. Union Army as both a recruiter and a chaplain during the Civil War.  Over the course of his life, “”he would develop an impressive resume, serving as a teacher, pastor, lecturer, and public servant” (Middleton 2002: 319).  Following his brief tenure in the U.S. Senate, Revels went on to become the first president of Alcorn State University in Mississippi.
Interested in learning more? Come by the Stone Center Library, where we have plenty of items to get you started:
Biographical sketches:

Essays:

As always, if you have any research questions, don’t hesitate to ask!  We are open Monday – Thursday 8:00 a.m. – 8:00 p.m. and Fridays 8:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m.  Our reference chat buddy name is StonecenterRef or you may also contact us via phone or email.  Happy reading!

MLK Jr Day 2011: Stone Center Library Resources

This Monday, we celebrate the life and legacy of a seminal figure of the U.S. Civil Rights Movement, a tireless champion of nonviolence and social justice whose efforts made him – at age 35 – the youngest recipient of a Nobel Peace Prize (1964).
If UNC’s MLK Jr Birthday Celebration activities next week leave you curious for further information, be sure to check out some of the holdings here at The Stone Center Library

Questions?  Contact us!  You can also find us on chat – our buddy name is: StonecenterRef.  Happy reading, and stay warm! 🙂

WEDNESDAY: “Pauli Murray v. UNC: Wrestling with Change in the Jim Crow South”

As part of the Pauli Murray Centennial Celebration initiated by Duke University’s Human Rights Center, UNC will be hosting the panel discussion “Pauli Murray v. UNC: Wrestling with Change in the Jim Crow South”, which highlights Murray’s attempts to gain admittance for graduate work at UNC in 1938-39.  This is an event that aims “to teach the university community about this history and to encourage reflection on the story of Murray’s activism: what kind of example does she offer in our own time?”

Event Information:

Wednesday, Nov. 3, 2010
5:15 p.m. reception | 6 p.m. program

Wilson Special Collections Library, Pleasants Family Assembly Room

***FREE AND OPEN TO THE PUBLIC***

Contact Information: Center for the Study of the American South, (919) 962-4433

Genna Rae McNeil, professor of history at UNC-Chapel Hill, will moderate the panel discussion, which includes the following participants:

The event will also feature a small exhibit of archival materials from the Southern Historical Collection in UNC’s Wilson Special Collections Library highlighting this historical moment.
Sponsored by UNC’s Center for the Study of the American South, the Southern Historical Collection, The Pauli Murray Project/Duke Human Rights Center, the Carolina Women’s Center, the UNC School of Information and Library Science (grad student assistance), and the Sonja Haynes Stone Center for Black Culture and History at UNC (organizational and in-kind assistance).
Interested in learning more about the panelists?  Check out some of their books available at UNC libraries:

Hope to see you there!

The Pauli Murray Project

The Pauli Murray Project is based in nearby Durham, NC and is run by Duke University’s Human Rights Center. Their mission is “to build stronger ties between our Durham, North Carolina communities through dialogue, education, storytelling and the creation of new ways of telling our unique history. In this work we honor the legacy and values of one of Durham’s unsung heroes, lawyer, activist, poet and priest, Pauli Murray”. The project’s website contains a wealth of information on Murray: a detailed biography, timeline, a bibliography of her writings, and useful listing of works about her. Or click here for a 1 minute video summarizing the project.
The Pauli Murray project is particularly interested in community input and collaboration, including their 2007-09 series “Face Up: Telling Stories of Community”. There are plenty of ways to get involved – sign up for their email list or contact them about volunteer opportunities. You can also follow the Project on Facebook.
In addition to next week’s event at UNC’s Wilson Library, the Pauli Murray Project will be hosting several commemorative events throughout the month of November and beyond. Check out the Pauli Murray Centennial Celebration events calendar here for further information.

Just who was Pauli Murray?

Born in 1910, Anna Pauline (“Pauli”) Murray was raised in Durham, NC and became a trailblazing participant in the civil rights and women’s rights movements. Murray was a woman of many talents and passions: an activist, an educator, a lawyer, a poet, and – at age 67 – the first female African American Episcopal priest. She was valedictorian of her high school class, and went on to earn degrees from Hunter College, Howard Law School, UC Berkeley (LLM), and Yale (JSD & MDiv). Murray was a founding member of NOW (National Organization for Women) and in 1947 Mademoiselle magazine named her “Woman of the Year.”
Murray’s distinguished career came about despite numerous obstacles due to her race and gender. As an African American, she was refused entry to UNC’s School of Law. As a woman, graduating first in her class at Howard earned her a Rosenwald Fellowship to attend Harvard for graduate studies in law, but Harvard reneged on this honor because of her gender. These are but early examples of the kinds of discrimination Murray would encounter over the course of her illustrious career as a legal scholar, activist, and religious leader.
November 20th marks the centennial of Pauli Murray’s birth, and Duke University’s Human Rights Center has planned a host of events in collaboration with area institutions, including UNC. The first of these events will take place next week at Wilson Library.
In the meantime, if you’re interested in learning more about Pauli Murray…

Sources:
http://www.ncwriters.org/services/lhof/inductees/pmurray.htm

Biography

Timeline


http://www.lib.unc.edu/blogs/news/index.php/2010/10/pauli-murray/
http://www.biography.com/articles/Pauli-Murray-214111

Dorothy Height, 1912-2010

Learn more about the fascinating life of civil rights pioneer Dorothy Height by reading her memoir, Open Wide the Freedom Gates. A copy of the book is available in the Stone Center Library.
Several books by Height are available in electronic format via the library catalog. Search for “Height, Dorothy” in the catalog to bring up the results.
An obituary can be found online at the New York Times web site.

New Resource: James Meredith, J. Edgar Hoover, and the Integration of the University of Mississippi

This collection documents James Meredith’s attempt to integrate the then all-white University of Mississippi in fall 1962 and the immediate aftermath. Mississippi’s refusal to allow Meredith to register led to a showdown between state and federal authorities and the storming of the campus by a segregationist mob. Two people died and dozens were injured. In the end, Ole Miss, the state of Mississippi, and the nation were forever changed. This database contains extensive FBI documentation on Meredith’s battle to enroll at the University of Mississippi in 1962 and white political and social backlash, including his correspondence with the NAACP and positive and negative letters Meredith received from around the world during his ordeal.
Search this resource.