Category Archives: Civil Rights

National Library Week 2011: More of what’s new @the Stone Center Library

In honor of National Library Week, our coverage of new arrivals currently on display here at the library continues.  Today’s theme is religion:

“This phenomenological analysis of African American religious subjectivity suggests the tragic, understood as an ontological category, as the seminal hermeneutical lens through which one can deepen one’s understanding of the experience and its theological implications.”

“The author provides background information on traditional black churches and today’s black megachurches and explores the influences of the former on the empowering socialization educational tactics employed in megachurch congregations.”

“For AIDS scholars, researchers, and community activists, Harris (sociology, California State U., Fullerton) draws from her dissertation research and fieldwork to describe AIDS activism in black churches in New York City, the formation of the black church AIDS movement, and the organizational development and marketing and education strategies of The Balm In Gilead.”

In America after the Civil War, the emancipation of four million slaves and the explosion of Chinese immigration fundamentally challenged traditional ideas about who belonged in the national polity. As Americans struggled to redefine citizenship in the United States, the “Negro Problem” and the “Chinese Question” dominated the debate. . . The book further explores how blacks and Chinese reimagined the evangelical nationalist project to suit their own needs and hopes. Historian Derek Chang brings together for the first time African American and Chinese American religious histories through a multitiered local, regional, national, and even transnational analysis of race, nationalism, and evangelical thought and practice.”

“This book explores the legacy of slavery in Black theological terms. Challenging the dominant approaches to the history and legacy of slavery in the British Empire, the contributors show that although the 1807 act abolished the slave trade, it did not end racism, notions of White supremacy, or the demonization of Blackness, Black people and Africa.”

“Touching on issues of slavery, geography, Native American history, Jewish-Christian relations, literacy, and translation, he brilliantly exposes how the loss of land and the supersessionist ideas behind the Christian missionary movement are both deeply implicated in the invention of race.”

“This book follows the extraordinary career of Dwight York, who in his teens started out in a New York street gang, but converted to Islam in prison. Emerging as a Black messiah, York proceeded to break the Paleman’s “spell of Kingu” and to guide his people through a series of racial/religious identities that demanded dramatic changes in costume, gender roles and lifestyle.”

“Beginning with King’s roots in Atlanta’s Ebenezer Baptist Church, Baldwin traces the evolution of King’s attitude toward the church through his college, seminary, graduate school, and civil rights years. The emphasis is on King’s concept of the church as “the voice of conscience.” . . Baldwin critiques the contemporary church on the basis of King’s prophetic model, and concludes by insisting that this model, not the entrepreneurial spirituality of the contemporary megachurches, embodies the best potential for much-needed church renewal.”

“The changes to U.S. immigration law that were instituted in 1965 have led to an influx of West African immigrants to New York, creating an enclave Harlem residents now call ”Little Africa.” These immigrants are immediately recognizable as African in their wide-sleeved robes and tasseled hats, but most native-born members of the community are unaware of the crucial role Islam plays in immigrants’ lives.”

Interested in learning more?  Don’t forget the Stone Center Library Guide to the Web, which  includes a section on Church Life, found within the category of Society and Government

Coming tomorrow: our series concludes with a look at new selections having to do with themes of community, migration, identity, and heritage.  Stay tuned!

National Library Week 2011: Celebrate with more new books @the SCL!

Yesterday, we posted a handful of the new books currently on display here at the library.  Today, we continue with a selection of those books pertaining to the arts, identity, and untold stories of the African Diaspora.  Click on the links below for more information, or come see us at the Stone Center Library:

“Focusing on orally transmitted cultural forms in the Caribbean, this book reaffirms the importance of myth and symbol in folk consciousness as a mode of imaginative conceptualization.”

“Lorick-Wilmore (sociology, Northeastern U.) explores the specific role and functions of community-based organizations in the creation of Black ethnic identity options for Caribbean immigrants in New York City.”

“Allegory and Meaning is the study of the allegorical-cum-symbolic mode in selected African, African American, and Caribbean literary works. It argues that the domain of allegory in these works constitutes, at bottom, a contested site of paradoxes. The discussion of these African, African American, and Caribbean writers’ use of the allegorical mode is a serious attempt to recover the subtext of their works.”

“Afro-Cuban Diasporas in the Atlantic World explores how Yoruba and Afro-Cuban communities moved across the Atlantic between the Americas and Africa in successive waves in the nineteenth century.”

“This book looks at the experiences of the average black person in England and Wales during the period of the British slave trade. . . This book overturns many of the conventional assumptions that have been made about their lives. They were not enslaved, stigmatised outsiders but woven into English society as government officials, defenders of the country, tradesmen, entertainers and founders of families who have left a legacy of their presence in the form of descendants that in some cases can be traced to the present day.”

 

Stay tuned!  Coming tomorrow: new books on African and African-American religions.

SCL Picks: “IndiVisible: African-Native American Lives in the Americas”

So many good books, so little time!  This week’s staff pick is IndiVisible: African-Native American Lives in the Americas, published by the Smithsonian Institution‘s National Museum of the American Indian.  This collection of essays by 27 scholars serves as a companion piece to the museum’s exhibit of the same name, which opened in 2009.  Here, “Readers will find four main lenses through which to consider African-Native American lives: racial policy, community, creative resistance (both peaceful and militant), and lifeways”(19).

Essays include:

  • “DNA and Native American Identity” (Kimberly Tallbear)
  • “Claiming the Name: White Supremacy, Tribal Identity, and Racial Policy in the Early Twentieth-Century Chesapeake” (Gabrielle Tayac)
  • “Red, Black, and Brown: Artists and the Aesthetics of Race” (Phoebe Farris)
  • “What Is a Black Indian?”: Misplaced Expectations and Lived Realities” (Robert Keith Collins)

… as well as “Native Americans, African Americans, and Jim Crow,” written by UNC’s own Dr. Theda Perdue, Atlanta Distinguished Professor of Southern Culture (Department of History).

Weaving colorful photographs, illustrations, primary source documents, and rich analyses, this tome “examines the long overlooked history of Native American and African American intersections.”  As such, it is a compelling (and gorgeously-presented) read for anyone interested in learning more about this oft-overlooked segment of the American population.

Interested in learning more?  Come by the library and check it out!  Also, don’t forget that back in November, in recognition of American Indian month, we posted a list of related resources available here at the library.  Happy reading!

Dr. Manning Marable (May 13, 1950 – April 1, 2011)

Reknown Malcolm X scholar Dr. Manning Marable passed away last Friday, April 1 at the age of 60.   Dr. Marable studied at Earlham College (A.B. ’71), the University of Wisconsin-Madison (M.A. ’72), and earned his Ph.D. in American History at the University of Maryland in 1976.  Dr. Marable would go on to pursue his scholarship at Cornell University, Fisk University, Colgate University, Ohio State University, University of Colorado at Boulder, and most recently, Columbia University, where he served as M. Moran Weston and Black Alumni Council Professor of African American Studies.

A prolific researcher, Dr. Marable produced nearly 300 articles and close to 20 books over the course of his storied career in African American studies.  His latest work, Malcolm X: A Life of Reinvention, was published today and is on order at the UNC Undergraduate Library.  In the meantime, here at the Stone Center Library, we encourage you to make use of our resources if you’re interested in examining Dr. Marable’s academic legacy in more detail.  For example, here are a handful of his books available here at the Library:

A full list of our holdings authored and/or edited by Dr. Marable is also available here.

 

 

Women’s History Month + new books display, part 2

On Friday, we started a list of new titles currently on display in honor of Women’s History Month.  Below is part two, which we welcome you to explore further by clicking on the links, or coming by the library to browse in person!

Interested in learning more?  Don’t forget that, from the comfort of your own home, you can also access the Stone Center Library’s Guide to the Web, which has a section of resources on women’s history available here.  Happy reading!

Women’s History Month + new books display, part 1

Last week, we posted a list of new book titles currently on display near the library entrance.  Today and next week, we’ll be highlighting our in-library display, which this month features new arrivals related to women’s history across a variety of genres and topics.

March is Women’s History Month and this year’s theme is “our history is our strength.”  What better way to learn more about women’s history, achievements, and current challenges than turning to some more of the Stone Center Library’s new acquisitions?  Come check us out!

New arrivals at the Stone Center Library

To those of you returning to campus from spring break, welcome back!  Here at the Library, it’s the season for new books – lots and lots of recent acquisitions spanning a variety of disciplines and genres.

For instance, if you’ve been to the library recently, you may have noticed our updated display:

picture of library display case

Here’s a closer look at some of our current highlights:

In the shadow of slavery : Africa’s botanical legacy in the Atlantic world (Judith A. Carney and Richard Nicholas Rosomoff).

  • “In this exciting, original, and groundbreaking book, Judith A. Carney and Richard Nicholas Rosomoff draw on archaeological records, oral histories, and the accounts of slave ship captains to show how slaves’ food plots-‘botanical gardens of the dispossessed’-became the incubators of African survival in the Americas and Africanized the foodways of plantation societies.”

The other side of paradise : a memoir (Staceyann Chin).

  • “From the iconic and charismatic star of ‘Russell Simmons’ Def Poetry Jam’ comes this brave and fiercely candid memoir about growing up in Jamaica by performer, activist, and writer Chin.”

The road to someplace better : from the segregated South to Harvard Business School and beyond. (Lillian Lincoln Lambert with Rosemary Brutico).

  • “Inspiring memoir of a groundbreaking business pioneer who broke down racial, gender, and social barriers to achieve unprecedented success. Lillian Lincoln Lambert received Harvard Business School’s Alumni Achievement Award in 2003 and has been featured on Good Morning America and in Time, the Washington Post, and Entrepreneur.”

The immortal life of Henrietta Lacks. (Rebecca Skloot).

  • “Her name was Henrietta Lacks, but scientists know her as HeLa. She was a poor Southern tobacco farmer who worked the same land as her slave ancestors, yet her cells-taken without her knowledge-became one of the most important tools in medicine.”

Til death or distance do us part : marriage and the making of African America (Frances Smith Foster).

  • “Conventional wisdom tells us that marriage was illegal for African Americans during the antebellum era, and that if people married at all, their vows were tenuous ones: ‘until death or distance do us part.’ Drawing on a trove of less well-known sources including family histories, folk stories, memoirs, sermons, and especially the fascinating writings from the Afro-Protestant Press, ‘Til Death or Distance Do Us Part offers a radically different perspective on antebellum love and family life.”

Caribbean middlebrow : leisure culture and the middle class (Belinda Edmondson).

  • “Edmondson (English and African American and African studies, Rutgers U.-Newark) tells the story of leisure culture in the Anglophone Caribbean for the past 150 years as a story of the nascent and aspiring black middle class striving to reconcile their origins in black-identified culture, with aspirations for social ascendance and international recognition.”

The literature police : apartheid censorship and its cultural consequences (Peter D. McDonald).

  • “The Literature Police affords a unique perspective on one of the most anachronistic, exploitative, and racist modern states of the post-war era, and on some of the many forms of cultural resistance it inspired. It also raises urgent questions about how we understand the category of the literary in today’s globalized, intercultural world.”

My Times in black and white : race and power at the New York times (Gerald M. Boyd ; afterword by Robin D. Stone).

  • “A rare inside view of power and behind-the-scenes politics at the nation’s premier newspaper, My Times in Black and White is the inspirational tale of a man who rose from urban poverty to the top of his field, struggling against whitedominated media, tearing down racial barriers, and all the while documenting the most extraordinary events of the latter twentieth century.”

Look and leave : photographs and stories from New Orleans’s Lower Ninth Ward (Jane Fulton Alt ; introduction by Michael A. Weinstein).

  • “As a participant in New Orleans’s “Look and Leave” program, Jane Fulton Alt accompanied Lower Ninth Ward residents back to their homes for the first time since fleeing Hurricane Katrina. It is through Alt’s social worker’s compassion and keen photographer’s eye that we are given a better understanding of what it meant to be a resident of the Lower Ninth Ward of New Orleans immediately following Hurricane Katrina.”

Examining Tuskegee : the infamous syphilis study and its legacy (Susan M. Reverby).

  • “The forty-year “Tuskegee” Syphilis Study has become the American metaphor for medical racism, government malfeasance, and physician arrogance. The subject of histories, films, rumors, and political slogans, it received an official federal apology from President Bill Clinton in a White House ceremony. Susan M. Reverby offers a comprehensive analysis of the notorious study of untreated syphilis, which took place in and around Tuskegee, Alabama, from the 1930s through the 1970s.”

The warmth of other suns : the epic story of America’s great migration (Isabel Wilkerson).

  • “In this epic, beautifully written masterwork, Pulitzer Prize-winning author Isabel Wilkerson chronicles one of the great untold stories of American history: the decades-long migration of black citizens who fled the South for northern and western cities, in search of a better life.”

Gridiron gauntlet : the story of the men who integrated pro football in their own words (Andy Piascik).

  • “One year before Jackie Robinson broke the color line in major league baseball, four black players joined the Cleveland Browns and Los Angeles Rams to become the first African-American pro football players in the modern era. Players who began their careers from 1946 to 1955 reminisce about the violence they faced on and off the field, the world of segregation and the violence it brought, but also of white players and coaches who assisted and supported their careers.”

Dark days, bright nights : from Black power to Barack Obama (Peniel E. Joseph).

  • “The Civil Rights Movement is now remembered as a long-lost era, which came to an end along with the idealism of the 1960s. In Dark Days, Bright Nights, acclaimed scholar Peniel E. Joseph puts this pat assessment to the test, showing the 60s—particularly the tumultuous period after the passage of the 1965 Voting Rights Act—to be the catalyst of a movement that culminated in the inauguration of Barack Obama.”

Airlift to America : how Barack Obama, Sr., John F. Kennedy, Tom Mboya, and 800 East African students changed their world and ours (Tom Shachtman).

  • “This long-hidden saga reveals how a handful of Americans and Kenyans fought the British colonial government, the U.S. State Department, and segregation to send nearly 800 young East African men and women to U.S. universities–many of whom would go on to change the world.”

 

Interested in any of these titles?  Click on the links above to check their availability online or come by the Stone Center Library, where you can also peruse our additional display of new books (in the back, by the periodicals).  Happy reading!

February 25, 1870: Hiram Revels sworn in as first African American U.S. Senator

Did you know?  On this day in 1870, Fayetteville-born Hiram Revels became the first African American to serve in the U.S. Senate.

Revels (1827-1901) trained as a minister and served the U.S. Union Army as both a recruiter and a chaplain during the Civil War.  Over the course of his life, “”he would develop an impressive resume, serving as a teacher, pastor, lecturer, and public servant” (Middleton 2002: 319).  Following his brief tenure in the U.S. Senate, Revels went on to become the first president of Alcorn State University in Mississippi.

Interested in learning more? Come by the Stone Center Library, where we have plenty of items to get you started:

Biographical sketches:

Essays:

As always, if you have any research questions, don’t hesitate to ask!  We are open Monday – Thursday 8:00 a.m. – 8:00 p.m. and Fridays 8:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m.  Our reference chat buddy name is StonecenterRef or you may also contact us via phone or email.  Happy reading!

FREE film screening TOMORROW (2/8) at the Stone Center: “Frederick Douglass and the White Negro” (2008)

The Sonja Haynes Stone Center for Black Culture and History kicks off the spring semester of its FREE Diaspora Festival of Black and Independent Film TOMORROW (2/8) evening at 7pm with a showing of “Frederick Douglass and the White Negro” (2008), directed by John Doherty.

 

“This documentary tells the story of this important 19th century leader and his escape from slavery, leading to refuge in Ireland on the eve of the Great Famine. The film focuses on the powerful influence Ireland had on him as a young man. It also explores the turbulent relationship between African Americans and Irish Americans in general. The relationship is exposed as a complex and tragic sequence of events culminating in the bloodiest riot in American history. This transatlantic story covers the race issue and is as relevant today as it was when Douglass escaped to Ireland—“I can truly say, I have spent some of the happiest moments of my life since landing in this country. I seem to have undergone a transformation. I live a new life…I am met by no upturned nose and scornful lip telling me ‘We don’t allow niggers in here!’””


This semester’s other screenings will be held on 2/10, 2/17, 2/24, 3/3, and 3/15.  Screenings generally feature commentary by the directors and/or relevant scholars and are held in the Stone Center’s Hitchcock Multipurpose Room.  For a full calendar of the films to be shown, click here.

 

Hope to see you there! 🙂

 

 

February 1, 1960: the launch of Greensboro sit-ins

51 years ago today, four student activists from NC A&T State University seated themselves at the then-segregated lunch counter of a Woolworth’s store in Greensboro, NC.  As African-Americans seated at a “Whites Only” counter, they were refused service.  Undeterred, these non-violent protesters returned the next day and the next, each time bringing an increasing number of supporters.

 

By the end of the week, their numbers reached the thousand mark and other local lunch counters found themselves similarly targeted as word of the protest spread.  By a month’s time, the sit-in movement had spread to neighboring states, despite the abuse and threats of violence suffered by protesters.  Woolworth’s was desegregated in August of that year and the International Civil Rights Museum estimates that by then, “more than 70,000 people had participated in sit-ins”, which in turn inspired a host of related protests at other segregated public spaces like churches and libraries.

 

Interested in learning more about this and other other milestones of U.S. Civil Rights history?  Not sure how to get started?  Don’t forget the Stone Center Library’s Guide to the Web!  Here you can find online resources for a variety of topics, such as Civil Rights history.  Happy reading!

 

 

Sources:
http://www.sitinmovement.org/history/greensboro-chronology.asp
http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=18615556
http://www.nps.gov/history/nr/travel/civilrights/nc1.htm