Category Archives: Military

New @the SCL: Military History

Over the course of Black History Month 2012, we’ve posted SCL Picks and new titles on a variety of topics: literature, fine arts, religion, gender, film studies, love, and even the first published novel by an African American woman. As February comes to a close, we thought we would round things out with four  recent titles in the area of military history.

As always, we also encourage you to make use of the Stone Center Library’s Guide to the Web, which includes a section of online resources covering African American military history. Plus, did you know the itself Guide is searchable? In addition to perusing the Guide by topic, the “Search the Guide” bar allows for keyword searching to pull sites listed in the guide from across sections. For example, searching for “Tuskegee” yields this list of websites contained within the Guide: Happy searching!

Opening TODAY @7pm: “The Civil Rights Struggle, African American GIs and Germany”

Opening TONIGHT at the Stone Center, this event is FREE and OPEN to the PUBLIC:

“The Civil Rights Struggle, African American GIs and Germany” exhibition will open at the Robert and Sallie Brown Gallery and Museum, Thursday, September 8, at 7pm.

“The exhibition, on display thru October 28, features photos, cartoons and political posters that tell an intriguing story of how American and German history became intertwined in the struggle for civil rights.

The exhibition was curated by Maria Hoehn, Professor of History at Vassar College and Dr. Martin Klimke, Research Fellow at the German Historical Institute in Washington, D.C.  This project expands the boundaries of the African American Freedom Struggle beyond the U.S. and depicts African American GIs as active participants in the victory over Nazism, the democratization of Germany after WWII, and in the advancement of civil rights in their own country and beyond.

The opening reception is set for 7pm on September 8 and is free and open to the public.   Professor Maria Hoehn will give a brief presentation at the reception.  Local representatives from the National Association of Black Veterans, Tuskegee Airmen, Montford Point Marines, and Buffalo Soldiers will attend the reception as special guests.”

More details about this exhibit are available HERE.

Interested in learning more? Come by the Stone Center Library and check out our latest display of related books. For example:

Juneteenth: An introduction & UNC resources

On June 19, 1865 – two years after the Emancipation Proclamation – Union soldiers arrived in Galveston, TX to enforce the previously declared abolition of slavery.

In recognition of this landmark event, Juneteenth was first established as a state holiday in Texas in 1980 and celebrates slavery’s end in the United States. Juneteenth is now celebrated in most states, including North Carolina, and it “celebrates African American freedom and achievement, while encouraging continuous self-development and respect for all cultures.”

Here at the Stone Center Library, we encourage you to learn more about this holiday, the events surrounding emancipation, and African-American celebrations in general by recommending a few books to get you started:

Interested in learning more? Don’t forget our Guide to the Web, which includes a list of resources on Emancipation and Reconstruction. Happy reading!

National Library Week 2011! More new titles @your [Stone Center] library!

Yesterday marked the start of ALA’s National Library Week 2011 and this year’s theme is “Create your own story @your library.”  If you’re looking for new stories to add to your arsenal, be sure to check out the Stone Center Library’s latest display of new titles.

Interested in Caribbean topics?  Then today’s highlights might be right up your alley.  Click on the links below for more information, or come by the library to browse in person!

“Clarke and Clarke have created a journal that provides an ethnographic record of the East Indians and Creoles of San Fernando–and the entire sugar belt south of the town known as Naparima. They record socio-political relations during the second year of Trinidad’s independence (1964), and provide first-hand evidence for the workings of a complex, plural society in which race, religion, and politics had become, and have remained, deeply intertwined.”

“Contrary to popular belief, the ideology of empire in the nineteenth-century British produced a number of West Indian Creoles who took the language and values of Britain’s supposedly liberal empire and turned them upside down. . . Inverting the racist hierarchy of nineteenth-century British imperial thought, twentieth-century political activists in the British West Indies used the concepts of liberal ideology to claim that the subject people of the West Indies constituted a Creole nation that deserved the right to govern itself.”

“This ground-breaking study of the Caribbean’s iconography traces the history of visual representations of the region, as perceived by outsider and insider alike, over the last five hundred years.”

“Artists, teachers, administrators, and researchers survey many facets of dance in the region, both folk dance from African and colonial heritages, and art dance that has mingled those traditions with others around the world.”

“Lewis’ last manuscript, The Modern Caribbean: a New Voyage of Discovery,” was scheduled to be published about the time of his death in 1991. Most of the chapters in this volume come from that previously unpublished work, although a few others are included. Lewis, a social scientist who was based at the University of Puerto Rico since 1955, wrote widely on the Caribbean from an interdisciplinary point of view.”


Coming tomorrow: new titles on display relating to other aspects of the African diaspora.

SCL Picks: “IndiVisible: African-Native American Lives in the Americas”

So many good books, so little time!  This week’s staff pick is IndiVisible: African-Native American Lives in the Americas, published by the Smithsonian Institution‘s National Museum of the American Indian.  This collection of essays by 27 scholars serves as a companion piece to the museum’s exhibit of the same name, which opened in 2009.  Here, “Readers will find four main lenses through which to consider African-Native American lives: racial policy, community, creative resistance (both peaceful and militant), and lifeways”(19).

Essays include:

  • “DNA and Native American Identity” (Kimberly Tallbear)
  • “Claiming the Name: White Supremacy, Tribal Identity, and Racial Policy in the Early Twentieth-Century Chesapeake” (Gabrielle Tayac)
  • “Red, Black, and Brown: Artists and the Aesthetics of Race” (Phoebe Farris)
  • “What Is a Black Indian?”: Misplaced Expectations and Lived Realities” (Robert Keith Collins)

… as well as “Native Americans, African Americans, and Jim Crow,” written by UNC’s own Dr. Theda Perdue, Atlanta Distinguished Professor of Southern Culture (Department of History).

Weaving colorful photographs, illustrations, primary source documents, and rich analyses, this tome “examines the long overlooked history of Native American and African American intersections.”  As such, it is a compelling (and gorgeously-presented) read for anyone interested in learning more about this oft-overlooked segment of the American population.

Interested in learning more?  Come by the library and check it out!  Also, don’t forget that back in November, in recognition of American Indian month, we posted a list of related resources available here at the library.  Happy reading!

February 25, 1870: Hiram Revels sworn in as first African American U.S. Senator

Did you know?  On this day in 1870, Fayetteville-born Hiram Revels became the first African American to serve in the U.S. Senate.

Revels (1827-1901) trained as a minister and served the U.S. Union Army as both a recruiter and a chaplain during the Civil War.  Over the course of his life, “”he would develop an impressive resume, serving as a teacher, pastor, lecturer, and public servant” (Middleton 2002: 319).  Following his brief tenure in the U.S. Senate, Revels went on to become the first president of Alcorn State University in Mississippi.

Interested in learning more? Come by the Stone Center Library, where we have plenty of items to get you started:

Biographical sketches:


As always, if you have any research questions, don’t hesitate to ask!  We are open Monday – Thursday 8:00 a.m. – 8:00 p.m. and Fridays 8:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m.  Our reference chat buddy name is StonecenterRef or you may also contact us via phone or email.  Happy reading!