Tag Archives: Available @the SCL

New @the SCL in POETRY

Happy National Poetry Month, y’all! Here are three poetry picks new to the SCL collection:

Coval K, Coval K. 2011. L-vis lives! : Racemusic poems. Chicago, Ill.: Haymarket Books. xvi, 103 ; p.
“From the poet the Chicago Tribune calls the new voice of Chicago, comes L-vis Lives!, a bold new collection of poetry and prose exploring the collision of race, art, and appropriation in American culture. L-vis is an imagined persona, a representation of artists who have used and misused Black music. Like so many others who gained fame and fortune from their sampling, L-vis is as much a sincere artist as he is a thief. In Kevin Coval’s poems, L-vis’ story is equal parts forgotten history, autobiography, and re-imaginings.” (Source: UNC catalog)

Griffiths R Eliza. 2011. Mule & Pear. Kalamazoo, MI: The College of Arts and Sciences Western Michigan Univerisity. 97 p.
“These poems speak to us with voices borrowed from the pages of novels of Alice Walker, Jean Toomer, and Toni Morrison — voices that still have more to say, things to discuss. Each struggles beneath a yoke of dreaming, loving, and suffering. These characters converse not just with the reader but also with each other, talking amongst themselves, offering up their secrets and hard-won words of wisdom, an everlasting conversation through which these poems voice a shared human experience.” (Source: Amazon)

Harriell D. c2010. Cotton : Poems. Detroit, Michigan: Willow Books. 77 ; p.
“In his remarkable debut collection, COTTON, Derrick Harriell has created a mural in poems. The characters that inhabit this vivid tableau step into an active third dimension and allow us to witness the vicissitudes of their daily struggles, triumphs large and small, private desires. The community here is anchored by a specific Midwestern, African-American family which, in spite of both external and internal challenges, maintains its unity, however precarious at times. Death, passion, humor, mother wit, history, place, these are the colors that Harriell mixes and applies with such artistry that readers may not be so sure if they are watching a particular world or if that world is watching them. Harriell is among America’s most exciting new voices in poetry.”–Maurice Kilwein Guevara (Source: Syndetic Solutions)

Looking for more poetry resources? In addition to searching the UNC catalog, don’t forget the Stone Center Library’s Guide to the Web has an extensive literature section, including several poetry-related sites. Happy reading!

New @the SCL: Head off & split (winner of the 2011 National Book Award in Poetry)

Is it us, or has April just flown by? As National Poetry Month winds down, we thought we’d highlight some recent acquisitions here at the SCL, starting today with a spotlight on Nikky Finney‘s National Book Award-winning anthology Head off & split : poems.

Widely praised, this collection artfully engages with a variety of timely topics. In the words of one reviewer:

“The poems in Nikky Finney’s breathtaking new collection Head Off & Split sustain a sensitive and intense dialogue with emblematic figures and events in African-American life: from Civil Rights matriarch Rosa Parks, to former Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice, from a brazen girl strung out on lightning, to a terrified woman abandoned on a rooftop during Hurricane Katrina. Her poet’s voice is defined by an intimacy, which holds a soft yet exacting-eye on the erotic, on uncanny political and family events, like her mother’s wedding waltz with S.C. Senator Strom Thurmond, and then again on the heart-breaking hilarity of an American President’s final state of the Union address. Artful and intense, Finney’s poems ask us to be mindful of what we fraction, fragment, cut off, dice, dishonor, or throw away, powerfully evoking both the lawless and the sublime.” (Source: http://nikkyfinney.net/books.html).

 

Interested in seeing what all the buzz is about? Be sure to come by the Stone Center Library and check out this book! More information about Head off & split and Nikky Finney herself may also be found on her website, and her acceptance speech for the 2011 National Book Award in Poetry is available on Vimeo.

New @the SCL: Women & Theater

Thanks to a recent donation from UNC-CH Department of Dramatic Art professor Kathy A. Perkins, the SCL now has several new titles on and by female playwrights. Check out:

Perkins, Kathy A. African Women Playwrights. Urbana: U of Illinois P, c2009.

Perkins, Kathy A. Black Female Playwrights : An Anthology of Plays Before 1950. Bloomington: Indiana UP, c1989.

Perkins, Kathy A. Black South African Women : An Anthology of Plays. Cape Town: U of Cape Town P, 1999.

Perkins, Kathy A., and Judith L. Stephens. Strange Fruit : Plays on Lynching by American Women. Bloomington: Indiana UP, c1998.

Perkins, Kathy A., and Roberta Uno. Contemporary Plays by Women of Color : An Anthology. London : Routledge, 1996.

Trying to find more titles on this topic? Here’s a hint: click on any of the links above, select the “Subjects” tab that appears in the catalog records, and several hyperlinked subjects will appear. Clicking on these subjects will lead you to any other books in the UNC catalog in that category.

So for example, Black South African Women : An Anthology of Plays is listed under the following subject headings:

Interested in reading more South African plays written in English? One option is South African drama (English), which leads to this list of titles. These results can be further refined using the check-boxes on the left-hand side of the screen, for everything from location to format to date of publication, and so forth.

Happy searching!

Women’s History Month Display Highlights

Have you been by the Stone Center Library lately? If so, you may have noticed our latest display, which features selections in honor of women’s history month, hand-picked by Stone Center Librarian Shauna Collier.

Here are some of the highlights:

Azaransky, Sarah. The Dream Is Freedom : Pauli Murray and American Democratic Faith. Oxford ;: Oxford UP, c2011.

Blair, Cynthia M. I’ve Got to Make My Livin’ : Black Women’s Sex Work in Turn-of-the-century Chicago. Chicago: U of Chicago P, 2010.

Haynes, Rosetta Renae. Radical Spiritual Motherhood : Autobiography and Empowerment in Nineteenth-century African American Women. Baton Rouge: Louisiana State UP, c2011.

Johnson, M. Mikell. Heroines of African American Golf : The Past, the Present and the Future. [Bloomington, Ind.]: Trafford Pub., c2010.

Lau, Kimberly J. Body Language : Sisters in Shape, Black Women’s Fitness, and Feminist Identity Politics. Philadelphia, Pa.: Temple UP, 2011.

Musser, Judith. “Girl, Colored” and Other Stories : A Complete Short Fiction Anthology of African American Women Writers in the Crisis Magazine, 1910-2010. Jefferson, N.C.: McFarland & Co., c2011.

Nevergold, Barbara Seals., and Peggy Brooks-Bertram. Go, Tell Michelle : African American Women Write to the New First Lady. Albany, N.Y.: Excelsior Editions/State U of New York P, c2009.

Perkins-Valdez, Dolen. Wench : A Novel. New York: Amistad, c2010.

Shields, John C., and Eric D. Lamore. New Essays on Phillis Wheatley. Knoxville: U of Tennessee P, c2011.

Winn, Maisha T. Girl Time : Literacy, Justice, and the School-to-prison Pipeline. New York: Teachers College P, c2011.

Like what you see? Come on by for these titles and more! The Stone Center Library is open 8am-8pm Monday-Thursday and Fridays 8am-5pm. The Library is on the third floor of the Stone Center on South Rd., near the Belltower.

SCL Picks for Women’s History Month

March is Women’s History Month and here at the Library options abound for those of you interested in women’s studies from a variety of approaches. Perhaps you’ve read the extremely popular novel The Help, have seen the award-winning film, or both. Love it or hate it, this complex work has inspired spirited debate with regard to its portrayal of race relations. Along these lines, today we thought we would feature a couple of our holdings on motherhood and the domestic sphere in the American South. Check out:

Born southern : childbirth, motherhood, and social networks in the old South, by V. Lynn Kennedy (2010).

  • “Kennedy’s unique approach links the experiences of black and white women, examining how childbirth and motherhood created strong ties to family, community, and region for both. She also moves beyond a simple exploration of birth as a physiological event, examining the social and cultural circumstances surrounding it: family and community support networks, the beliefs and practices of local midwives, and the roles of men as fathers and professionals. . . Kennedy’s systematic and thoughtful study distinguishes southern approaches to childbirth and motherhood from northern ones, showing how slavery and rural living contributed to a particularly southern experience.” (Source: http://search.lib.unc.edu/search?R=UNCb6283703)

Cooking in other women’s kitchens : domestic workers in the South, 1865-1960, by Rebecca Sharpless (2010).

  • “Through letters, autobiography, and oral history, this book evokes African American women’s voices from slavery to the open economy, examining their lives at work and at home. Sharpless looks beyond stereotypes to introduce the real women who left their own houses and families each morning to cook in other women’s kitchens.” (Source: http://search.lib.unc.edu/search?R=UNCb6460585)

If this topic piques your interest, don’t forget we’re always happy to provide further recommendations and/or reference assistance – by phone, email, or chat (StoneCenterRef). And in case you missed it the first time, here’s our Women’s History Month Round-Up of previous SCL blog entries and online resources in women’s studies, including the Stone Center Library’s Guide to the Web.

Next up on the SCL blog: Have you come by the Library lately? Make sure you check out our latest display, featuring hand-picked selections by Stone Center Librarian Shauna Collier for Women’s History Month. Stay tuned!

Women’s History Month Round-Up

March marks the start of Women’s History Month and this year’s theme is “Women’s Education – Women’s Empowerment.” Before going on  a brief blogging hiatus for Spring Break next week, we thought we’d jump-start the month with a round-up of online resources and pertinent posts from the SCL blog archives. 

For example… did you know our Stone Center Library Guide to the Web contains a wealth of sites related to women’s history, achievements, and issues  across a variety of disciplines? Check out some simple searches here, here, and here.  From science and technology to literature and the arts, we’ve got you covered! 

In addition to these general resources, we’ve periodically featured profiles of compelling women of historical and cultural significance. See, for example, our previous posts highlighting the following female figures: 

Looking for a broader perspective? More of a book person? You’re in luck! Over the last couple of years we’ve taken the time to put together lists of recommendations for Women’s History Month which you may consult at your leisure: here, here, here, and here

We hope these links provide some inspiration for whatever your research or reading needs may be, and hope that you will check in after the break for more from us as we continue to celebrate women’s history here at the Stone Center Library. Finally, best of luck to those of you winding your way through midterm exams and assignments – Spring Break is almost here! 

New @the SCL: Military History

Over the course of Black History Month 2012, we’ve posted SCL Picks and new titles on a variety of topics: literature, fine arts, religion, gender, film studies, love, and even the first published novel by an African American woman. As February comes to a close, we thought we would round things out with four  recent titles in the area of military history.

As always, we also encourage you to make use of the Stone Center Library’s Guide to the Web, which includes a section of online resources covering African American military history. Plus, did you know the itself Guide is searchable? In addition to perusing the Guide by topic, the “Search the Guide” bar allows for keyword searching to pull sites listed in the guide from across sections. For example, searching for “Tuskegee” yields this list of websites contained within the Guide: http://bit.ly/wnbZGo. Happy searching!

Spring Break Hours! Reduced Schedule: March 5 – March 9

Spring Break is just around the corner! Next week, the Stone Center Library will be operating on a reduced schedule, so please be sure to plan accordingly:

**Spring Break Schedule: March 5 – March 9, 2012**

Monday – Friday 8 a.m. – 5 p.m.
Saturday CLOSED
Sunday CLOSED

Working on midterms and projects? Thinking ahead to final papers? Don’t forget to make use of not only the Library, but our blog archives, for inspiration as well as fun reads. Not sure where to start? Here are a few suggestions: 

We will be open regular hours this week and encourage those of you on campus to make use of our group study rooms, lovely carrels, and well-lit study area. Can’t make it to the library? Our chat buddy name is StoneCenterRef or contact Stone Center Librarian Shauna Collier at shauna.collier@unc.edu for an in-person consultation.

SCL Picks: Oscars Edition

The 84th annual Academy Awards will take place this Sunday and among this year’s contenders is The Help, which has been nominated for four awards, including nods for Viola Davis (Best Actress) and Octavia Spencer (Best Supporting Actress). This film takes place in 1960s Mississippi and chronicles the intersecting lives of white women and their African-American maids against the backdrop of major social upheaval nationwide. Of course, before it was an Oscar-nominated film, The Help was a best-selling book, as reviewed by Stone Center Librarian Shauna Collier in a previous SCL blog post, and available here at the Library.

Interested in learning more about African Americans and the film industry? Here, in no particular order, are ten titles to get you started:

The books listed above are but a sampling of related items available here at the Stone Center Library. Come by and check us out!

New @the SCL, Part 3: Hot Topics!

Today we close out our tripartite series on new books on display here at the Library with selections covering a range of hot topics: gender, religion, hip-hop, sex work, HBCUs, marriage, and more. To read more about each title, click the links below!

The Black Mega-Church: Theology, Gender, and the Politics of Public Engagement (Tamelyn N. Tucker-Worgs)

I Believe I’ll Testify: The Art of African American Preaching (Cleophus J. LaRue)

Wake Up: Hip-Hop Christianity and the Black Church (Cheryl Kirk-Duggan & Marlon Hall)

Masculinity in the Black Imagination: Politics of Communicating Race and Manhood (Edited by Ronald L. Jackson and Mark C. Hopson)

Novel Bondage: Slavery, Marriage, and Freedom in Nineteenth-century America (Tess Chakkalakal)

Is Marriage for White People? How the African American Marriage Decline Affects Everyone (Ralph Richard Banks)

Keepin’ It Hushed: The Barbership and African American Hush Harbor Rhetoric (Vorris L. Nunley)

I’ve Got to Make My Livin’: Black Women’s Sex Work in Turn-of-the-Century Chicago (Cynthia M. Blair)

America’s Historically Black Colleges & Universities: A Narrative history, 1837-2009 (Bobby L. Lovett)

In case you missed it, Parts 1 and 2 are available here and here. For those of you in the throes of classes and possibly starting to contemplate research projects, we hope these posts have given you some ideas. As always, our chat reference buddy name is StoneCenterRef, and Stone Center Librarian Shauna Collier (shauna[dot]collier[at]unc[dot]edu) is happy to take your reference questions. 

Happy Friday, y’all, and have a great weekend!