Tag Archives: Caribbean

IAAR Brown Bag – “Condom Distribution and Safe Sex Messaging Intervention Targeting Young Black Women”

The UNC-Chapel Hill Institute of African American Research (IAAR) continues their spring 2015 series of brown bag lectures with a presentation by Diane Francis, UNC-CH School of Journalism and Mass Communication.  The talk will be held on February 9, 2015 at 12:00pm in Room 309C of the Sonja Haynes Stone Center. Ms. Francis talk is titled “Condom Distribution and Safe Sex Messaging Intervention Targeting Young Black Women”.

The Stone Center Library staff has prepared a bibliography to accompany this lecture, the PDF of which can be found here.

Additional information about Ms. Francis’ work can be found here: http://caribbeanhealth.org/

IAAR Brown Bag – “Brazilian Quilombos: Historical & Contemporary Struggles”

The UNC-Chapel Hill Institute of African American Research (IAAR) will be holding the first in their spring 2015 series of brown bag lectures –  “Brazilian Quilombos: Historical & Contemporary Struggles” presented by Adam Bledsoe, UNC-CH Department of Geography – on January 12, 2015 at 12:00pm in Room 309C of the Sonja Haynes Stone Center.

The Stone Center Library staff has prepared a bibliography to accompany this lecture, the PDF of which can be found here.

 

New @the SCL, Part 1: Literature & Literary Studies!

If you’ve been by the Stone Center Library lately, you may have noticed some great new books on display. If not, here’s the first of three posts highlighting some recent acquisitions in literature and literary studies available here at the SCL:

Juice: a Novel (Ishmael Reed)

Cross-Cultural Visions in African American Literature: West meets East (Edited by Yoshinobu Hakutani)

Salvage the Bones: A Novel (Jesmyn Ward) — 2011 National Book Award winner!

Authentic Blackness / Real Blackness: Essays on the Meaning of Blackness in Literature and Culture (edited by Martin Japtok and Jerry Rafiki Jenkins)

Conversations with Walter Mosley (Edited by Owen E. Brady)

Wench: a Novel (Dolen Perkins-Valdez)

The Indignant Generation: A Narrative History of African American Writers and Critics, 1934-1960

The Routledge Companion to Anglophone Caribbean Literature (Edited by Michael A. Bucknor and Alison Donnell)

“Girl, Colored” and Other Stories: A Complete Short Fiction Anthology of African American Women Writers in The Crisis Magazine, 1910-2010 (Edited by Judith Musser)

Stay tuned for more new titles in dance, religion, politics, and more!

National Library Week 2011: Celebrate with more new books @the SCL!

Yesterday, we posted a handful of the new books currently on display here at the library.  Today, we continue with a selection of those books pertaining to the arts, identity, and untold stories of the African Diaspora.  Click on the links below for more information, or come see us at the Stone Center Library:

“Focusing on orally transmitted cultural forms in the Caribbean, this book reaffirms the importance of myth and symbol in folk consciousness as a mode of imaginative conceptualization.”

“Lorick-Wilmore (sociology, Northeastern U.) explores the specific role and functions of community-based organizations in the creation of Black ethnic identity options for Caribbean immigrants in New York City.”

“Allegory and Meaning is the study of the allegorical-cum-symbolic mode in selected African, African American, and Caribbean literary works. It argues that the domain of allegory in these works constitutes, at bottom, a contested site of paradoxes. The discussion of these African, African American, and Caribbean writers’ use of the allegorical mode is a serious attempt to recover the subtext of their works.”

“Afro-Cuban Diasporas in the Atlantic World explores how Yoruba and Afro-Cuban communities moved across the Atlantic between the Americas and Africa in successive waves in the nineteenth century.”

“This book looks at the experiences of the average black person in England and Wales during the period of the British slave trade. . . This book overturns many of the conventional assumptions that have been made about their lives. They were not enslaved, stigmatised outsiders but woven into English society as government officials, defenders of the country, tradesmen, entertainers and founders of families who have left a legacy of their presence in the form of descendants that in some cases can be traced to the present day.”

 

Stay tuned!  Coming tomorrow: new books on African and African-American religions.

National Library Week 2011! More new titles @your [Stone Center] library!

Yesterday marked the start of ALA’s National Library Week 2011 and this year’s theme is “Create your own story @your library.”  If you’re looking for new stories to add to your arsenal, be sure to check out the Stone Center Library’s latest display of new titles.

Interested in Caribbean topics?  Then today’s highlights might be right up your alley.  Click on the links below for more information, or come by the library to browse in person!

“Clarke and Clarke have created a journal that provides an ethnographic record of the East Indians and Creoles of San Fernando–and the entire sugar belt south of the town known as Naparima. They record socio-political relations during the second year of Trinidad’s independence (1964), and provide first-hand evidence for the workings of a complex, plural society in which race, religion, and politics had become, and have remained, deeply intertwined.”

“Contrary to popular belief, the ideology of empire in the nineteenth-century British produced a number of West Indian Creoles who took the language and values of Britain’s supposedly liberal empire and turned them upside down. . . Inverting the racist hierarchy of nineteenth-century British imperial thought, twentieth-century political activists in the British West Indies used the concepts of liberal ideology to claim that the subject people of the West Indies constituted a Creole nation that deserved the right to govern itself.”

“This ground-breaking study of the Caribbean’s iconography traces the history of visual representations of the region, as perceived by outsider and insider alike, over the last five hundred years.”

“Artists, teachers, administrators, and researchers survey many facets of dance in the region, both folk dance from African and colonial heritages, and art dance that has mingled those traditions with others around the world.”

“Lewis’ last manuscript, The Modern Caribbean: a New Voyage of Discovery,” was scheduled to be published about the time of his death in 1991. Most of the chapters in this volume come from that previously unpublished work, although a few others are included. Lewis, a social scientist who was based at the University of Puerto Rico since 1955, wrote widely on the Caribbean from an interdisciplinary point of view.”

 

Coming tomorrow: new titles on display relating to other aspects of the African diaspora.

Film showing TONIGHT @The Stone Center: Cuba – An African Odyssey Part 2

Looking for something to do tonight?  Check out the following announcement:

Cuba: An African Odyssey Part 2

With a Post-Film discussion moderated by Dr. Firoze Manji

Free and Open to the Public

When: Monday March 28  @ 7pm

Where: Hitchcock Multipurpose Room

In this ambitious and revealing documentary, Egyptian-French filmmaker Jihan El-Tahri traces the history of Cuban solidarity with African liberation movements in the 1960s and 70s. It begins in 1965 when Che Guevara led a group of Cuban revolutionary fighters in an unsuccessful attempt to support the struggle for true independence in the Congo. Part 2 moves to Cuba’s role in the struggles against Portuguese colonialism in Guinea-Bissau and Angola.

Cuba: An African Odyssey combines remarkable archival footage—much of it never before seen in the U.S.—with an amazing cast of participants showing Cuba’s pivotal role in the liberation movements in Africa. Over 300,000 Cubans fought alongside African revolutionaries, one of many examples of Cuba’s true internationalism.

A post-film discussion will be moderated by special guest Dr. Firoze Manji, who is visiting UNC this week.  Dr. Manji is editor-in-chief of Pambazuka news, produced by a pan-African community of some 2,600 citizens and organisations – academics, policy makers, social activists, women’s organisations, civil society organisations, writers, artists, poets, bloggers, and commentators who together produce insightful, sharp and thoughtful analyses and make it one of the largest and most innovative and influential web forums for social justice in Africa.

This showing is part of a film series that examines the legacy of the Black radical tradition.  Future showings include:

April 4: W.E.B. Du Bois: A Biography in Four Voices

April 18: American Revolution 2

April 25: Bastards of the Party

All showings begin at 7pm in the Hitchcock Multipurpose Room, Sonja Haynes Stone Center, UNC-Chapel Hill

**Co-Sponsored by the Black Student Movement**

New arrivals at the Stone Center Library

To those of you returning to campus from spring break, welcome back!  Here at the Library, it’s the season for new books – lots and lots of recent acquisitions spanning a variety of disciplines and genres.

For instance, if you’ve been to the library recently, you may have noticed our updated display:

picture of library display case

Here’s a closer look at some of our current highlights:

In the shadow of slavery : Africa’s botanical legacy in the Atlantic world (Judith A. Carney and Richard Nicholas Rosomoff).

  • “In this exciting, original, and groundbreaking book, Judith A. Carney and Richard Nicholas Rosomoff draw on archaeological records, oral histories, and the accounts of slave ship captains to show how slaves’ food plots-‘botanical gardens of the dispossessed’-became the incubators of African survival in the Americas and Africanized the foodways of plantation societies.”

The other side of paradise : a memoir (Staceyann Chin).

  • “From the iconic and charismatic star of ‘Russell Simmons’ Def Poetry Jam’ comes this brave and fiercely candid memoir about growing up in Jamaica by performer, activist, and writer Chin.”

The road to someplace better : from the segregated South to Harvard Business School and beyond. (Lillian Lincoln Lambert with Rosemary Brutico).

  • “Inspiring memoir of a groundbreaking business pioneer who broke down racial, gender, and social barriers to achieve unprecedented success. Lillian Lincoln Lambert received Harvard Business School’s Alumni Achievement Award in 2003 and has been featured on Good Morning America and in Time, the Washington Post, and Entrepreneur.”

The immortal life of Henrietta Lacks. (Rebecca Skloot).

  • “Her name was Henrietta Lacks, but scientists know her as HeLa. She was a poor Southern tobacco farmer who worked the same land as her slave ancestors, yet her cells-taken without her knowledge-became one of the most important tools in medicine.”

Til death or distance do us part : marriage and the making of African America (Frances Smith Foster).

  • “Conventional wisdom tells us that marriage was illegal for African Americans during the antebellum era, and that if people married at all, their vows were tenuous ones: ‘until death or distance do us part.’ Drawing on a trove of less well-known sources including family histories, folk stories, memoirs, sermons, and especially the fascinating writings from the Afro-Protestant Press, ‘Til Death or Distance Do Us Part offers a radically different perspective on antebellum love and family life.”

Caribbean middlebrow : leisure culture and the middle class (Belinda Edmondson).

  • “Edmondson (English and African American and African studies, Rutgers U.-Newark) tells the story of leisure culture in the Anglophone Caribbean for the past 150 years as a story of the nascent and aspiring black middle class striving to reconcile their origins in black-identified culture, with aspirations for social ascendance and international recognition.”

The literature police : apartheid censorship and its cultural consequences (Peter D. McDonald).

  • “The Literature Police affords a unique perspective on one of the most anachronistic, exploitative, and racist modern states of the post-war era, and on some of the many forms of cultural resistance it inspired. It also raises urgent questions about how we understand the category of the literary in today’s globalized, intercultural world.”

My Times in black and white : race and power at the New York times (Gerald M. Boyd ; afterword by Robin D. Stone).

  • “A rare inside view of power and behind-the-scenes politics at the nation’s premier newspaper, My Times in Black and White is the inspirational tale of a man who rose from urban poverty to the top of his field, struggling against whitedominated media, tearing down racial barriers, and all the while documenting the most extraordinary events of the latter twentieth century.”

Look and leave : photographs and stories from New Orleans’s Lower Ninth Ward (Jane Fulton Alt ; introduction by Michael A. Weinstein).

  • “As a participant in New Orleans’s “Look and Leave” program, Jane Fulton Alt accompanied Lower Ninth Ward residents back to their homes for the first time since fleeing Hurricane Katrina. It is through Alt’s social worker’s compassion and keen photographer’s eye that we are given a better understanding of what it meant to be a resident of the Lower Ninth Ward of New Orleans immediately following Hurricane Katrina.”

Examining Tuskegee : the infamous syphilis study and its legacy (Susan M. Reverby).

  • “The forty-year “Tuskegee” Syphilis Study has become the American metaphor for medical racism, government malfeasance, and physician arrogance. The subject of histories, films, rumors, and political slogans, it received an official federal apology from President Bill Clinton in a White House ceremony. Susan M. Reverby offers a comprehensive analysis of the notorious study of untreated syphilis, which took place in and around Tuskegee, Alabama, from the 1930s through the 1970s.”

The warmth of other suns : the epic story of America’s great migration (Isabel Wilkerson).

  • “In this epic, beautifully written masterwork, Pulitzer Prize-winning author Isabel Wilkerson chronicles one of the great untold stories of American history: the decades-long migration of black citizens who fled the South for northern and western cities, in search of a better life.”

Gridiron gauntlet : the story of the men who integrated pro football in their own words (Andy Piascik).

  • “One year before Jackie Robinson broke the color line in major league baseball, four black players joined the Cleveland Browns and Los Angeles Rams to become the first African-American pro football players in the modern era. Players who began their careers from 1946 to 1955 reminisce about the violence they faced on and off the field, the world of segregation and the violence it brought, but also of white players and coaches who assisted and supported their careers.”

Dark days, bright nights : from Black power to Barack Obama (Peniel E. Joseph).

  • “The Civil Rights Movement is now remembered as a long-lost era, which came to an end along with the idealism of the 1960s. In Dark Days, Bright Nights, acclaimed scholar Peniel E. Joseph puts this pat assessment to the test, showing the 60s—particularly the tumultuous period after the passage of the 1965 Voting Rights Act—to be the catalyst of a movement that culminated in the inauguration of Barack Obama.”

Airlift to America : how Barack Obama, Sr., John F. Kennedy, Tom Mboya, and 800 East African students changed their world and ours (Tom Shachtman).

  • “This long-hidden saga reveals how a handful of Americans and Kenyans fought the British colonial government, the U.S. State Department, and segregation to send nearly 800 young East African men and women to U.S. universities–many of whom would go on to change the world.”

 

Interested in any of these titles?  Click on the links above to check their availability online or come by the Stone Center Library, where you can also peruse our additional display of new books (in the back, by the periodicals).  Happy reading!