Tag Archives: Education

IAAR Women of Color and Culturally Relevant Educational Leadership

iaarwoc

The UNC Chapel Hill Institute of African American Research (IAAR) is sponsoring a talk by Dr. Sylvia Rodriguez Vargas on the topic of culturally relevant leadership in independent schools on Tuesday, March 17, 2015 at 3pm in the Toy Lounge of Dey Hall on the UNC Chapel Hill campus.

The Stone Center Library staff has prepared a list of references available through UNC-CH Libraries that can shed more light on this and related topics, including culturally relevant education and women in education.

RESOURCES AVAILABLE THROUGH UNC CHAPEL HILL LIBRARIES

Independent Schools

Beadie, Nancy, and Kimberley Tolley. Chartered Schools: Two Hundred Years of Independent Academies in the United States, 1727-1925. New York: Routledge Falmer, 2002. Print. (Available in UNC-CH Davis Library)

Case, Agnes Gilman. Operating an Independent School: A Guide for School Leaders. Lanham, MD: Rowman & Littlefield Education, 2006. Print. (Available in UNC-CH Davis Library)

Hughes, Kimberly B., and Sara A. M. Silva. Identifying Leaders for Urban Charter, Autonomous and Independent Schools: Above and beyond the Standards. Bingley: Emerald Group Pub., 2013. Print. (Available in UNC-CH Davis Library)

Independent Schools: A Handbook. 6th ed. Princeton, NJ: Secondary School Admission Test Board, 1980. Print. (Available in UNC-CH Davis Library)

Kane, Pearl Rock. Independent Schools, Independent Thinkers. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass, 1992. Print. (Available in UNC-CH Davis Library)

Blacks in Education

Asumah, Seth Nii, and Valencia C. Perkins. Educating the Black Child in the Black Independent School. Binghamton, NY: Global Publications, 2001. Print. (Available in UNC-CH Davis Library)

Kane, Pearl Rock., and Alfonso J. Orsini. The Colors of Excellence: Hiring and Keeping Teachers of Color in Independent Schools. New York: Teachers College, 2003. Print. (Available in UNC-CH Davis Library)

Leadership through Achievement: Women of Color in Higher Education. Washington, DC: American Council on Education, 2005. Print. (Available in UNC-CH Davis Library)

Vargas, Lucila. Women Faculty of Color in the White Classroom: Narratives on the Pedagogical Implications of Teacher Diversity. New York: P. Lang, 2002. Print. (Available in UNC-CH Stone Center Library)

Mallery, David. Negro Students in Indepedent Schools. Boston: National Association of Public Schools, 1963. Print. (Available in UNC-CH Davis Library)

Slaughter-Defoe, Diana T. Black Educational Choice Assessing the Private and Public Alternatives to Traditional K-12 Public Schools. Santa Barbara, CA: Praeger, 2012. Print. (Available in UNC-CH Stone Center Library)

Women in Education

Dean, Diane R., Susan J. Bracken, and Jeanie K. Allen. Women in Academic Leadership: Professional Strategies, Personal Choices. Sterling, VA.: Stylus Pub., 2009. Print. (Available in UNC-CH Davis Library)

This source list is available as a printable PDF.

Compiled by Stephanie Cornelison

Rosenwald Schools: UNC Resources

If last week’s post on the history of the Rosenwald Schools piqued your interest, here’s a sampling of related resources available in several libraries on campus:

 Ascoli, Peter Max. Julius Rosenwald : the Man Who Built Sears, Roebuck and Advanced the Cause of Black Education in the American South. Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 2006. Print.

Deutsch, Stephanie. You Need a Schoolhouse : Booker T. Washington, Julius Rosenwald, and the Building of Schools for the Segregated South. Evanston, Ill.: Northwestern University Press, 2011. Print.

Embree, Edwin R. Negro Progress Since Emancipation : Address Delivered at Dedication of the 5000th Rosenwald School, Greenbriar, Va., November 21, 1930. Atlanta, Ga.: Commission on Interracial Cooperation, 1931. Print.

Hanchett, Thomas W. The Rosenwald Schools and Black Education in North Carolina. 1988. Print.

Hoffschwelle, Mary S. The Rosenwald Schools of the American South. Gainesville: University Press of Florida, 2006. Print.

Merriwether, Lucile. High School Library Service in Tennessee Rosenwald Demonstration Units,. Peabody library school, 1934. Print.

Julius Rosenwald Fund. Committee on School Plant Rehabilitation. Improvement and Beautification of Rural Schools; Report of Committee on School Plant Rehabilitation. Rosenwald Fund, 1936. Print.

Reed, Betty Jamerson. The Brevard Rosenwald School : Black Education and Community Building in a Southern Appalachian Town, 1920-1966. Jefferson, N.C.: McFarland & Co., 2004. Print.

Sanders, Wiley Britton. Negro Child Welfare in North Carolina, a Rosenwald Study,. Pub. for the North Carolina State Board of Charities and Public Welfare by the University of North Carolina Press, 1933. Print.

Shields, Carol Jones. Hamilton Rosenwald School Preservation Story : Preserving the Memories, the Faces, and the Place. Windsor, N.C.: Roanoke River Partners, 2011. Print.

Sosland, Jeffrey K. A School in Every County : the Partnership of Jewish Philanthropist Julius Rosenwald & American Black Communities. Washington, D.C.: Economics & Science Planning, 1995. Print.

United States. Division of Cooperative Extension. Report of Special Summer Schools for Negro Extension Agents Under the Direction of Office of Cooperative Extension Work, United States Department of Agriculture in Cooperation with Federal and State Extension Services of the Southern States, Partially Financed by Julius Rosenwald Fund, Held at Orangeburg, S.C., Nashville, Tenn. [and] Prairie View, Tex., August 1930. 1930. Print.

Weatherford, Carole Boston. Dear Mr. Rosenwald. 1st ed. New York: Scholastic Press, 2006. Print.

Wilson, Louis Round. County Library Service in the South; a Study of the Rosenwald County Library Demonstration,. The University of Chicago Press, 1935. Print.

 

The Rosenwald Schools: A Brief History

2012 marks the 100th anniversary of the Rosenwald Schools, first established in 1912 to educate African Americans in the rural south (http://on.mgmadv.com/M5zNJJ). Over 5,300 schools were built in 15 states, from Maryland to Texas, all financed in part by Julius Rosenwald (of Sears, Roebuck & Co.). This funding initiative concluded in 1932 and yielded 5,357 buildings in 883 counties. Significantly, North Carolina was home to over 800 Rosenwald Schools, the most of any state (http://www.historysouth.org/schoolhistory.html). A map of Rosenwald School locations is available online here.

As an attempt to rectify the gross inequities of contemporary public schooling opportunities for African Americans, Rosenwald’s philanthropy was inspired by Booker T. Washington’s “hands-on self-help approach,” as modeled by his foundational work in establishing the Tuskeegee Institute (http://www.historysouth.org/schoolhistory.html). In keeping with Dr. Washington’s vision for public schooling, Rosenwald schools were conceived as community centers that “would not only teach the young, but would help dispersed rural people come together to improve farming technique and forge a strong community culture” (http://www.historysouth.org/schoolhistory.html).

In addition, the Rosenwald Schools pioneered the concept of the matching grant: “If a rural black community could scrape together a contribution, and if the white school board would agree to operate the facility, Rosenwald would contribute cash – usually about 1/5 of the total project” (http://www.historysouth.org/schoolhistory.html). The buildings themselves were also distinctive, resulting from state-of-the art architectural plans that painstakingly took into account the scarcity of electricity in rural areas and instead sought to maximize natural light by all means possible; to the point that different floor plans existed based on which compass direction a specific building would face (http://www.historysouth.org/schoolhistory.html).

Despite their far-reaching impact and historical cultural significance, however, few of the original structures remain. In 2002, the Rosenwald Schools made the National Trust for Historic Preservation’s list of America’s 11 Most Endangered Historic Places (http://www.hpo.ncdcr.gov/rosenwald/rosenwald.htm). Beginning in 2000, the North Carolina State Historic Preservation Office (HPO) and the North Carolina Rosenwald Schools Community Project (RSCP) have combined forces to conduct surveys, aid in the addition of 25 Rosenwald structures in the National Register, and identifying 39 additional candidates for inclusion (http://www.hpo.ncdcr.gov/rosenwald/rosenwald.htm). In honor of this year’s centenary, the first National Rosenwald Schools Conference was held in Tuskegee, Alabama last week. Stay tuned to the SCL blog for more on this topic!

New @the SCL, Part 2: issues in education

Last week, we posted a partial listing of new books currently on display here at the Library. Today, we continue with a quick posting on new arrivals covering a wide range of topics in education – in the U.S. and abroad, secondary and post-secondary pedagogy and experiences, and other recent research.

Check out what’s new @the SCL, part 2:

Enjoy! And don’t forget to stay tuned for next week’s final installment, featuring new acquisitions on a variety of topics related to religious studies.

New @the SCL: “Experiences of single African-American Women Professors”

Newly available at the SCL, today’s staff pick is Experiences of single African-American women professors : With this Ph.D., I thee wed, edited by Eletra S. Gilchrist (c2011. Lanham, Md.: Lexington Books). A fascinating collection of essays written by “never-before-married and doctorate degree-holding African-American women professors,” titles include:

  • “Black, educated, and female: A perspective on contemporary courtship,” by Celeste Walls, Ph.D.
  • “‘Acting like a lady and doing me’: Rejecting the ‘strong black woman’ stereotype, sexism, and settling,” by Kandace L. Harris, Ph.D.
  • “The myth and mismatch of balance: Black female professors’ construction of balance, integration, and negotiation of work and life,” by Natalie T. J. Tindall, Ph.D. and Markesha S. McWilliams.
  • “‘I’m in the middle of nowhere!’: The dating experiences of black, female doctoral students and faculty at predominantly white environments,” by Mounira Morris, Ed.D.
  • “Neither an ‘old maid’ nor a ‘Miss Independent’: Deflating the negative perceptions of single African-American women professors,” by Eletra S. Gilchrist, Ph.D.

These are but a sample of the thought-provoking issues raised in this volume, in which “The authors and research participants speak candidly about their experiences, exploring a myriad of topics including dating costs and rewards, relationship challenges, work/life balance, multiple intersecting identities, negative perceptions, and identity negotiation.” A complete summary and further information is available here in the UNC library catalog and we highly encourage you to come by the Library and check it out!

For more on this topic, here are a couple of other titles, also available here at the SCL:

Happy reading!

 

 

 

Women’s History Month Display Highlights

Have you been by the Stone Center Library lately? If so, you may have noticed our latest display, which features selections in honor of women’s history month, hand-picked by Stone Center Librarian Shauna Collier.

Here are some of the highlights:

Azaransky, Sarah. The Dream Is Freedom : Pauli Murray and American Democratic Faith. Oxford ;: Oxford UP, c2011.

Blair, Cynthia M. I’ve Got to Make My Livin’ : Black Women’s Sex Work in Turn-of-the-century Chicago. Chicago: U of Chicago P, 2010.

Haynes, Rosetta Renae. Radical Spiritual Motherhood : Autobiography and Empowerment in Nineteenth-century African American Women. Baton Rouge: Louisiana State UP, c2011.

Johnson, M. Mikell. Heroines of African American Golf : The Past, the Present and the Future. [Bloomington, Ind.]: Trafford Pub., c2010.

Lau, Kimberly J. Body Language : Sisters in Shape, Black Women’s Fitness, and Feminist Identity Politics. Philadelphia, Pa.: Temple UP, 2011.

Musser, Judith. “Girl, Colored” and Other Stories : A Complete Short Fiction Anthology of African American Women Writers in the Crisis Magazine, 1910-2010. Jefferson, N.C.: McFarland & Co., c2011.

Nevergold, Barbara Seals., and Peggy Brooks-Bertram. Go, Tell Michelle : African American Women Write to the New First Lady. Albany, N.Y.: Excelsior Editions/State U of New York P, c2009.

Perkins-Valdez, Dolen. Wench : A Novel. New York: Amistad, c2010.

Shields, John C., and Eric D. Lamore. New Essays on Phillis Wheatley. Knoxville: U of Tennessee P, c2011.

Winn, Maisha T. Girl Time : Literacy, Justice, and the School-to-prison Pipeline. New York: Teachers College P, c2011.

Like what you see? Come on by for these titles and more! The Stone Center Library is open 8am-8pm Monday-Thursday and Fridays 8am-5pm. The Library is on the third floor of the Stone Center on South Rd., near the Belltower.

New @the SCL, Part 3: Hot Topics!

Today we close out our tripartite series on new books on display here at the Library with selections covering a range of hot topics: gender, religion, hip-hop, sex work, HBCUs, marriage, and more. To read more about each title, click the links below!

The Black Mega-Church: Theology, Gender, and the Politics of Public Engagement (Tamelyn N. Tucker-Worgs)

I Believe I’ll Testify: The Art of African American Preaching (Cleophus J. LaRue)

Wake Up: Hip-Hop Christianity and the Black Church (Cheryl Kirk-Duggan & Marlon Hall)

Masculinity in the Black Imagination: Politics of Communicating Race and Manhood (Edited by Ronald L. Jackson and Mark C. Hopson)

Novel Bondage: Slavery, Marriage, and Freedom in Nineteenth-century America (Tess Chakkalakal)

Is Marriage for White People? How the African American Marriage Decline Affects Everyone (Ralph Richard Banks)

Keepin’ It Hushed: The Barbership and African American Hush Harbor Rhetoric (Vorris L. Nunley)

I’ve Got to Make My Livin’: Black Women’s Sex Work in Turn-of-the-Century Chicago (Cynthia M. Blair)

America’s Historically Black Colleges & Universities: A Narrative history, 1837-2009 (Bobby L. Lovett)

In case you missed it, Parts 1 and 2 are available here and here. For those of you in the throes of classes and possibly starting to contemplate research projects, we hope these posts have given you some ideas. As always, our chat reference buddy name is StoneCenterRef, and Stone Center Librarian Shauna Collier (shauna[dot]collier[at]unc[dot]edu) is happy to take your reference questions. 

Happy Friday, y’all, and have a great weekend!

Walter Dean Myers named new National Ambassador for Young People’s Literature

As of today, author Walter Dean Myers is officially the new National Ambassador for Young People’s Literature. Established in 2008, “The National Ambassador for Young People’s Literature raises national awareness of the importance of young people’s literature as it relates to lifelong literacy, education and the development and betterment of the lives of young people.”

Last week, several newspapers published interviews with Myers, whose slogan for this two-year appointment is “Reading Is Not Optional.” Here are a few excerpts from the New York Times article by Julie Bosman:

“As an African-American man who dropped out of high school but built a successful writing career — largely because of his lifelong devotion to books — Mr. Myers said his message would be etched by his own experiences.”

“The choice of Mr. Myers represents a departure from his predecessors and is likely to be seen as a bold statement. His books chronicle the lives of many urban teenagers, especially young, poor African-Americans. While his body of work includes poetry, nonfiction and the occasional cheerful picture book for children, its standout books offer themes aimed at young-adult readers: stories of teenagers in violent gangs, soldiers headed to Iraq and juvenile offenders imprisoned for their crimes.”

“While many young-adult authors shy away from such risky subject material, Mr. Myers has used his books to confront the darkness and despair that fill so many children’s lives.”

(Source: NYT: “Children’s Book Envoy Defines His Mission”)