Tag Archives: Journalism

SCL Boredom-Buster #13: “Nobody Called Me Charlie,” by Charles Preston

Good morning, y’all! Today’s Boredom-Buster is:

Nobody called me Charlie: the story of a radical white journalist writing for a Black newspaper in the Civil Rights era, by Charles Preston.

  • In the 1940s, at the height of segregation, Charles Preston became the unlikely newest worker at a black owned-and-operated newspaper. Preston, a white man and, unbeknownst to most of his colleagues, a member of the Communist Party, quickly came face to face with issues of race and injustice that would profoundly impact his life and change the way he understood United States society. This fictionalized account . . . takes on the central question of this nation’s history: can a truly human and humane society be built on a foundation of profound and pervasive racial inequality? Of course, the answer is no. Yet how do we make such a society? Or put another way, how must white people try to live their lives and how must they connect with their black brothers and sisters, personally and politically, to make a world in which the horrible scars of racism are healed once and for all? The answer that shines through Preston’s book–whether he is writing (and reporting) about work, local politics, the civil rights struggle, housing, education, entertainment,travel, sports, business, child-rearing, friendship, or intimate relationships–is that whites must do what he did: give up their whiteness. This is a book you will not forget.” (Source Syndetic Solutions)

Enjoy! And don’t forget to tune in tomorrow for our next pick! 🙂

SCL Picks: Hip-Hop!

As Black Music Month comes to a close, we’d be remiss if we didn’t highlight just a few more of the Library’s holdings… check out some of our picks in hip-hop!

Pictured above: Stand and deliver: political activism, leadership, and hip hop culture; Icons of hip hop: an encyclopedia of the movement, music, and culture (Vols. 1 & 2); The black chord: visions of the groove: connections between Afro-beats, rhythm & blues, hip hop, and more; That’s the joint!: the hip-hop studies reader; And it don’t stop!: the best American hip-hop journalism of the last 25 years.

Looking for more? How about…

Happy reading! 🙂

Read all about it: SCL Picks for LGBT Pride Month

In addition to being Black Music Month, June is also Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender Pride Month. For our first set of recommendations for this week, the Stone Center Library would like to highlight some more of our recent acquisitions related to LGBT studies, reflecting a wide range of approaches – from journalism to queer theory to performance studies. Enjoy!

Thinking Queerly: Race, Sex, Gender, and the Ethics of Identity (2010) David Ross Fryer

“Queer theory and the gay rights movement historically have been in tension, with the former critiquing precisely the identity politics on which the latter relies. Yet neither queer theory, in its predominately poststructuralist form, nor the gay rights movement, with its conservative inclusionary aspirations, has adequately addressed questions of identity or the political struggles against normativity that mark the lives of so many queer people. Taking on issues of race, sex, gender, and what he calls the ethics of identity, Fryer offers a new take on queer theory ‘one rooted in phenomenology rather than poststructuralism’ that seeks to put postnormative thinking at its center. This provocative book gives us a glimpse of what thinking queer can look like in our posthumanist age.”

Post Black: How a New Generation is Redefining African American identity (2010) Ytasha L. Womack; foreword by Derek T. Dingle

“Highlighting certain socioeconomic and cultural trends, this exploration discloses the new dynamics shaping contemporary lives of African Americans. Using information from conversations with mavericks within black communities–such as entrepreneurs, artists, scholars, and activists as well as members of both the working and upper classes–this powerful examination gives voice to what the author has deemed “post black” approaches to business, lifestyles, and religion that are nowhere else reflected as part of black life. The argument states that this new, complex black identity is strikingly different than the images handed down from previous generations and offers new examples of behavior, such as those shown by President Obama, gays and lesbians, young professionals, and black Buddhists. Contending that this new generation feels as unwelcome in traditional churches as in hip-hop clubs, this dynamic provocation dispels myths about current, popular black identity.”

Representations of Homosexuality: Black Liberation Theology and Cultural Criticism (2010) Roger A. Sneed

“This book challenges black religious and cultural critics to rethink theological and ethical approaches to homosexuality. Sneed demonstrates how black liberation theology and has often characterized homosexuality as a problem to be solved, and his work here offers a different way for black religious scholars to approach black homosexuality and religious experiences. Drawing on a range of black gay writers from Essex Hemphill to J.L. King, Sneed identifies black gay men’s literature as a rich source for theological and ethical reflection and points black religious scholarship toward an ethics of openness.”

Bulldaggers, Pansies, and Chocolate Babies: Performance, Race, and Sexuality in the Harlem Renaissance (2010) James F. Wilson

“Bulldaggers, Pansies, and Chocolate Babies shines the spotlight on historically neglected plays and performances that challenged early twentieth-century notions of the stratification of race, gender, class, and sexual orientation. . . Blues-singing lesbians, popularly known as ‘bulldaggers,’ performed bawdy songs; cross-dressing men vied for the top prizes in lavish drag balls; and black and white women flaunted their sexuality in scandalous melodramas and musical revues. . . James F. Wilson has based his rich cultural history on a wide range of documents from the period, including eyewitness accounts, newspaper reports, songs, and play scripts, combining archival research with an analysis grounded in a cultural studies framework that incorporates both queer theory and critical race theory.”

 

(Excerpts from Syndetic Solution summaries.)

TODAY at 5:30 – lecture by journalist Helene Cooper

Check out the following press release for a great opportunity taking place on campus later TODAY:

 

The curriculum in Global Studies is proud to present

A Public Lecture with Helene Cooper

March 22nd |  5:30 PM  |   FedEx Global Education Center, Nelson Mandela Auditorium

 

“Helene Cooper is a globally renowned journalist and the author of the acclaimed memoir The House at Sugar Beach. She has reported from war-torn regions across the globe for The Wall Street Journal and now writes for the New York Times as their White House correspondent in Washington, D.C.

Cooper was born in Liberia to a family descended from the American freed slaves that colonized the country. At age fourteen, she fled to the United States to escape the violence of a bloody coup. Graduating from UNC Chapel Hill with a degree in journalism and mass communication, Cooper began her career covering trade, politics, race and foreign policy. She later worked as a foreign correspondent and reported on conflicts from Europe to the Middle East.

Known for her rigorous investigation and insightful reporting, Cooper has received significant praise for her work. She employed these talents in the research and writing of her two books: an edited collection of the work of her colleague Daniel Pearl, who was murdered by the Taliban in 2002, and the New York Times bestselling memoir The House at Sugar Beach, which traces her trajectory from a privileged child to a refugee to an American journalist while examining the violence and stratification that troubles her homeland Liberia.”

 

New arrivals at the Stone Center Library

To those of you returning to campus from spring break, welcome back!  Here at the Library, it’s the season for new books – lots and lots of recent acquisitions spanning a variety of disciplines and genres.

For instance, if you’ve been to the library recently, you may have noticed our updated display:

picture of library display case

Here’s a closer look at some of our current highlights:

In the shadow of slavery : Africa’s botanical legacy in the Atlantic world (Judith A. Carney and Richard Nicholas Rosomoff).

  • “In this exciting, original, and groundbreaking book, Judith A. Carney and Richard Nicholas Rosomoff draw on archaeological records, oral histories, and the accounts of slave ship captains to show how slaves’ food plots-‘botanical gardens of the dispossessed’-became the incubators of African survival in the Americas and Africanized the foodways of plantation societies.”

The other side of paradise : a memoir (Staceyann Chin).

  • “From the iconic and charismatic star of ‘Russell Simmons’ Def Poetry Jam’ comes this brave and fiercely candid memoir about growing up in Jamaica by performer, activist, and writer Chin.”

The road to someplace better : from the segregated South to Harvard Business School and beyond. (Lillian Lincoln Lambert with Rosemary Brutico).

  • “Inspiring memoir of a groundbreaking business pioneer who broke down racial, gender, and social barriers to achieve unprecedented success. Lillian Lincoln Lambert received Harvard Business School’s Alumni Achievement Award in 2003 and has been featured on Good Morning America and in Time, the Washington Post, and Entrepreneur.”

The immortal life of Henrietta Lacks. (Rebecca Skloot).

  • “Her name was Henrietta Lacks, but scientists know her as HeLa. She was a poor Southern tobacco farmer who worked the same land as her slave ancestors, yet her cells-taken without her knowledge-became one of the most important tools in medicine.”

Til death or distance do us part : marriage and the making of African America (Frances Smith Foster).

  • “Conventional wisdom tells us that marriage was illegal for African Americans during the antebellum era, and that if people married at all, their vows were tenuous ones: ‘until death or distance do us part.’ Drawing on a trove of less well-known sources including family histories, folk stories, memoirs, sermons, and especially the fascinating writings from the Afro-Protestant Press, ‘Til Death or Distance Do Us Part offers a radically different perspective on antebellum love and family life.”

Caribbean middlebrow : leisure culture and the middle class (Belinda Edmondson).

  • “Edmondson (English and African American and African studies, Rutgers U.-Newark) tells the story of leisure culture in the Anglophone Caribbean for the past 150 years as a story of the nascent and aspiring black middle class striving to reconcile their origins in black-identified culture, with aspirations for social ascendance and international recognition.”

The literature police : apartheid censorship and its cultural consequences (Peter D. McDonald).

  • “The Literature Police affords a unique perspective on one of the most anachronistic, exploitative, and racist modern states of the post-war era, and on some of the many forms of cultural resistance it inspired. It also raises urgent questions about how we understand the category of the literary in today’s globalized, intercultural world.”

My Times in black and white : race and power at the New York times (Gerald M. Boyd ; afterword by Robin D. Stone).

  • “A rare inside view of power and behind-the-scenes politics at the nation’s premier newspaper, My Times in Black and White is the inspirational tale of a man who rose from urban poverty to the top of his field, struggling against whitedominated media, tearing down racial barriers, and all the while documenting the most extraordinary events of the latter twentieth century.”

Look and leave : photographs and stories from New Orleans’s Lower Ninth Ward (Jane Fulton Alt ; introduction by Michael A. Weinstein).

  • “As a participant in New Orleans’s “Look and Leave” program, Jane Fulton Alt accompanied Lower Ninth Ward residents back to their homes for the first time since fleeing Hurricane Katrina. It is through Alt’s social worker’s compassion and keen photographer’s eye that we are given a better understanding of what it meant to be a resident of the Lower Ninth Ward of New Orleans immediately following Hurricane Katrina.”

Examining Tuskegee : the infamous syphilis study and its legacy (Susan M. Reverby).

  • “The forty-year “Tuskegee” Syphilis Study has become the American metaphor for medical racism, government malfeasance, and physician arrogance. The subject of histories, films, rumors, and political slogans, it received an official federal apology from President Bill Clinton in a White House ceremony. Susan M. Reverby offers a comprehensive analysis of the notorious study of untreated syphilis, which took place in and around Tuskegee, Alabama, from the 1930s through the 1970s.”

The warmth of other suns : the epic story of America’s great migration (Isabel Wilkerson).

  • “In this epic, beautifully written masterwork, Pulitzer Prize-winning author Isabel Wilkerson chronicles one of the great untold stories of American history: the decades-long migration of black citizens who fled the South for northern and western cities, in search of a better life.”

Gridiron gauntlet : the story of the men who integrated pro football in their own words (Andy Piascik).

  • “One year before Jackie Robinson broke the color line in major league baseball, four black players joined the Cleveland Browns and Los Angeles Rams to become the first African-American pro football players in the modern era. Players who began their careers from 1946 to 1955 reminisce about the violence they faced on and off the field, the world of segregation and the violence it brought, but also of white players and coaches who assisted and supported their careers.”

Dark days, bright nights : from Black power to Barack Obama (Peniel E. Joseph).

  • “The Civil Rights Movement is now remembered as a long-lost era, which came to an end along with the idealism of the 1960s. In Dark Days, Bright Nights, acclaimed scholar Peniel E. Joseph puts this pat assessment to the test, showing the 60s—particularly the tumultuous period after the passage of the 1965 Voting Rights Act—to be the catalyst of a movement that culminated in the inauguration of Barack Obama.”

Airlift to America : how Barack Obama, Sr., John F. Kennedy, Tom Mboya, and 800 East African students changed their world and ours (Tom Shachtman).

  • “This long-hidden saga reveals how a handful of Americans and Kenyans fought the British colonial government, the U.S. State Department, and segregation to send nearly 800 young East African men and women to U.S. universities–many of whom would go on to change the world.”

 

Interested in any of these titles?  Click on the links above to check their availability online or come by the Stone Center Library, where you can also peruse our additional display of new books (in the back, by the periodicals).  Happy reading!

Friday, Feb 18: Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist and author Isabel Wilkerson

Coming up this FRIDAY, Feb. 18 at 5:30pm, Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist and author Isabel Wilkerson will discuss her new book, “The Warmth of Other Suns: The Epic Story of America’s Great Migration” in the Nelson Mandela Auditorium of the FedEx Global Education Center. This event is FREE and OPEN to the PUBLIC, but REGISTRATION is required, so make sure to sign up ASAP. Hope to see you there!

 

Also, don’t forget that the Triangle African American History Colloqium’s 5th annual New Perspectives on African American History and Culture Conference kicks off this Friday, with a keynote address by Professor Evelyn Brooks Higginbotham.  So many great events on campus, so little time!

TOMORROW: “Tell About the South”, talk by UNC Park Fellow Lorraine Ahearn

For interested faculty and graduate students, UNC’s School of Journalism & Mass Communication is hosting an interesting talk taking place TOMORROW at NOON dealing with little-known details about NC’s Civil Rights history.

EVENT INFORMATION:

“Tell About the South” with Lorraine Ahearn, doctoral Park Fellow at the UNC School of Journalism & Mass Communication
Wednesday, December 01 2010
12:00pm-1:00pm
Open to graduate students & faculty.  Lunch will be served.  Seating is limited so please RSVP ASAP to 962-5665 or lbeavers@unc.edu

“In 1937, students from Bennett College for Women organized a boycott of white movie theaters in Greensboro, N.C., over Jim Crow-era censorship. Local theater owners were cutting movie scenes in which black actors played “non-traditional” roles that crossed the color line of segregation. What ensued was a media conflict on two fronts. First, white theater owners censored what they believed violated local custom, while African-American students organized the community to apply economic pressure for change.  On the second front, black newspapers including the Chicago Defender offered a narrative that clashed with the version the city’s white-owned newspaper told about the theater owners’ action. Ahearn’s research looks at the role of mass media imagery in early civil rights history, and how the two newspapers framed this incident in history.”

The full event announcement is available here.

Thursday, Oct. 14: “The Race Beat: History and Legacy” panel

The UNC School of Journalism and Mass Communication will host a panel discussion Oct. 14 with acclaimed reporters and editors who covered the American civil rights movement. “The Race Beat: History and Legacy” – part of the Nelson Benton Lecture Series at the school – will be held in the Carroll Hall auditorium Oct. 14 at 5:30 p.m. It is free and open to the public.

The event features the co-authors of the Pulitzer Prize-winning book “The Race Beat,” Hank Klibanoff and Gene Roberts. Klibanoff, former managing editor of the Atlanta Journal-Constitution and former deputy managing editor of The Philadelphia Inquirer, will moderate the panel. Roberts, former editor of The Philadelphia Inquirer and former managing editor of The New York Times, will be a panelist.

The other panelists are Hodding Carter, UNC professor of public policy and former editor of the Delta Democrat Times (Greenville, Miss.); Joe Cumming, former Atlanta bureau chief for Newsweek; and Moses J. Newson, former executive editor of the Baltimore Afro-American and former reporter at the Tri-State Defender in Memphis, Tenn.

For more details about this event, please see the School of Journalism and Mass Communication website.

Interested in learning more about the book?
check it out!
– see the New York Time’s book review
listen to NPR’s conversation with co-author Klibanoff