Tag Archives: literary criticism

“So be it! See to it!”: A Celebration of Octavia Butler

Handwritten notes from one of Octavia Butler’s notebooks. Photo from the Huntington Library’s blog.

Feb. 24, 2016, marks the 10thanniversary of the death of Octavia Butler (1947 – 2006), known as the “grand dame of science fiction.” Her books and short stories critiqued contemporary power structures while imagining a radical new future, addressing issues of class, race, gender and sexuality along the way. Her powerful visions of the world as it could be helped kickstart a new literary genre: Afrofuturism, an examination of the intersection between race and technology that envisions the future while interrogating the past.

A lifelong writer, Octavia Butler’s body of work includes twelve novels and two short story collections. Her novels have won numerous honors and awards within the science fiction community and beyond. In 1995, she became the first science fiction writer to receive the MacArthur Fellowship, also known as the “Genius Grant.”

The Stone Center Library is proud to join the celebration the literary impact of Octavia Butler’s life. Many of Octavia Butler’s writings are available at UNC Libraries, so rather than list her novels, we would like to highlight the literary conversation that is part of her legacy.

In this post, we’ve gathered books that feature discussion of Octavia Butler’s work, analyzing its themes and looking at it in the context of African American, science fiction, and Afrofuturist literature.

All of these books are available at the Stone Center Library. Each title links to the book’s UNC Library catalog entry, where you can check their availability and learn more about them. Each entry is also accompanied by quote from the book’s official description.

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