Tag Archives: New @the SCL

New @the SCL, Part 2: The Arts!

Welcome back, faithful readers! Yesterday we posted the first of three listings of new books currently on display here at the Stone Center Library. Today’s new titles cover a wide range of the arts, including dance, film, music, and visual arts.

The Devil Finds Work (James Baldwin)

Horror Noire: Blacks in American Horror Films from the 1890s to Present (Robin R. Means Coleman)

Black Social Dance in Television Advertising: An Analytical History (Carla Stalling Huntington)

Marion D. Cuyjet and Her Judimar School of Dance: Training Black Ballerinas in Black Philadelphia 1948-1971 (Melanye White Dixon; with a Foreword by Lynette Young Overby)

The Dance Claimed Me: a Biography of Pearl Primus (Peggy & Murray Schwartz)

The Life, Art, and Times of Joseph Delaney, 1904-1991 (Frederick C. Moffatt)  

A to Z of African Americans: African Americans in the Visual Arts (Steven Otfinoski)

Back in the Days: Remix (Photographs by Jamel Shabazz)

Slaves Waiting for Sale: Abolitionist Art and the American Slave Trade (Maurie D. McInnis)

Intrigued by any of the above titles? Click on the links for a brief summary or come by the Library and peruse at your leisure!

Coming tomorrow: post three of three, featuring a bevy of hot topics such as religion, gender studies, and more… stay tuned!

New @the SCL, Part 1: Literature & Literary Studies!

If you’ve been by the Stone Center Library lately, you may have noticed some great new books on display. If not, here’s the first of three posts highlighting some recent acquisitions in literature and literary studies available here at the SCL:

Juice: a Novel (Ishmael Reed)

Cross-Cultural Visions in African American Literature: West meets East (Edited by Yoshinobu Hakutani)

Salvage the Bones: A Novel (Jesmyn Ward) — 2011 National Book Award winner!

Authentic Blackness / Real Blackness: Essays on the Meaning of Blackness in Literature and Culture (edited by Martin Japtok and Jerry Rafiki Jenkins)

Conversations with Walter Mosley (Edited by Owen E. Brady)

Wench: a Novel (Dolen Perkins-Valdez)

The Indignant Generation: A Narrative History of African American Writers and Critics, 1934-1960

The Routledge Companion to Anglophone Caribbean Literature (Edited by Michael A. Bucknor and Alison Donnell)

“Girl, Colored” and Other Stories: A Complete Short Fiction Anthology of African American Women Writers in The Crisis Magazine, 1910-2010 (Edited by Judith Musser)

Stay tuned for more new titles in dance, religion, politics, and more!

SCL Picks: MLK Day Edition!

Happy MLK Day, everyone! In commemoration of this day of service and reflection, here’s a quick list of recent books related to the path-breaking Martin Luther King Jr. All titles are available here at the Stone Center Library and we encourage you to come by and check them out!

All Labor Has Dignity: “An unprecedented and timely collection of Dr. King’s speeches on labor rights and economic justice”

Behind the dream : the making of the speech that transformed a nation: “a thrilling, behind-the-scenes account of the weeks leading up to the great event, as told by Clarence Jones, a co-writer of the speech and close confidant to King himself.”

Burial for a King : Martin Luther King Jr.’s funeral and the week that transformed Atlanta and rocked the nation: “Compelling and original, Burial for a King captures a defining moment in America’s history. It encapsulates King’s legacy, America’s shifting attitude toward race, and the emergence of Atlanta as a new kind of Southern city.”

Interested in U.S. Civil Rights more generally? Check out these recent SCL acquisitions:

For even more resources available here at the Library, take a look at last year’s MLK Day post, as well as the Civil Rights section of the Stone Center Library’s Guide to the Web. Happy reading!

NEW SCL DISPLAY!

Have you been by the Stone Center Library lately? If so, you’ve hopefully noticed our new display:

Our latest selection of recently acquired books features titles related to African Americans in American culture, in keeping with our recent event with UNC history professor “Fitz” Brundage:

All titles are available here at the library and we encourage you to come by and check them out. Happy reading, and have a great weekend!

Photos from Professor Brundage’s 11/1 lecture

Thanks to everyone who came out to Professor Brundage’s booktalk on the first of the month! We hope you all found his lecture informative and thought-provoking and we encourage you all to take another look at Stone Center Librarian Shauna Collier’s  list of related books available here at the SCL if this is a topic you wish to explore further.

SCL Pick: “The house on Diamond Hill : a Cherokee plantation story”

Happy Friday, everyone! In honor of Native American Heritage Month, today’s SCL Pick is a recent addition to our collection: The house on Diamond Hill: a Cherokee plantation story, by public historian Tiya Miles. Miles is a 2011 MacArthur Fellow and her research “explores the complex interrelationships between African and Cherokee people living and working in colonial America.” She is currently a professor at the University of Michigan and you can read a fuller biography of her accomplishments here.

The house on Diamond Hill: a Cherokee plantation story is available here at the Library and we encourage you to check it out. Here’s a brief summary from the catalog description:

  • “At the turn of the nineteenth century, James Vann, a Cherokee chief and entrepreneur, established Diamond Hill, the most famous plantation in the southeastern Cherokee Nation. In this first full-length study to reconstruct the history of the plantation, Tiya Miles tells the story of Diamond Hill’s founding, its flourishing, its takeover by white land-lottery winners on the eve of the Cherokee Removal, its decay, and ultimately its renovation in the 1950s. This moving multiracial history sheds light on the various cultural communities that interacted within the plantation boundaries–from elite Cherokee slaveholders to Cherokee subsistence farmers, from black slaves of various ethnic backgrounds to free blacks from the North and South, from German-speaking Moravian missionaries to white southern skilled laborers. Moreover, the book includes rich portraits of the women of these various communities. Vividly written and extensively researched, this history illuminates gender, class, and cross-racial relationships on the southern frontier.”

A brief preview is also available on Google books. If you’re interested in learning more about research on Native Americans and African Americans, check out our previous post with a list of related books.

SCL Boredom-Buster #16: “A life in full and other stories”

Today’s SCL anti-boredom-month pick is a collection of new short stories hailing from top African writers.A nightmare vision of life inside a security fence. . . A group of priests facing their faith amid civil war. . . A white girl discovering the secrets of the African world around her. . . Desperate romance against the backdrop of a tyrannous forced marriage. . . Warrior ethics among boys who live on a rubbish dump.” For these riveting stories and more, be sure to check out:

A life in full and other stories: the Caine Prize for African writing

“The best in new short story fiction from Africa’s leading literary award.” First awarded in 2000, the Caine Prize for African Writing honors the late Sir Michael Caine, fulfilling his wish to reward and recognize excellence in African writing in English. As such, “Its focus is on the short story, as reflecting the contemporary development of the African story-telling tradition.” A life in full and other stories is a collection of the best submissions of 2010: the five stories short-listed, as well as those selected for the Prize’s Writer’s Workshop, including “Stickfighting Days” by Oluferni Terry from Sierra Leone, who would go on to win that year’s prize.

Happy reading! 🙂

Two-for-one-Tuesday! SCL Boredom-Buster(s) #15.1 & 15.2: “The Beautiful Things That Heaven Bears” & “How to Read the Air”

Good morning, faithful readers! Seems hard to believe it’s already the last week of July – where did the summer go? Today also marks the last week of our SCL Boredom-Busters series and we’re wrapping up much as we began, with hot picks in FICTION.

Kicking off the beginning of the end, check out this double feature by Ethiopian author Dinaw Mengestu:

The beautiful things that heaven bears

  • “Seventeen years ago, Sepha Stephanos fled the Ethiopian Revolution after witnessing soldiers beat his father to the point of certain death, selling off his parents’ jewelry to pay for passage to the United States. Now he finds himself running a grocery store in a poor African-American neighborhood in Washington, D.C. . . Told in a haunting and powerful first-person narration that casts the streets of Washington, D.C., and Addis Ababa through Sepha’s eyes, The Beautiful Things That Heaven Bears is a deeply affecting and unforgettable debut novel about what it means to lose a family and a country-and what it takes to create a new home.”

AND

How to read the air

  • “One early September afternoon, Yosef and Mariam, young Ethiopian immigrants who have spent all but their first year of marriage apart, set off on a road trip from their new home in Peoria, Illinois, to Nashville, Tennessee, in search of a new identity as an American couple. Soon, their son, Jonas, will be born in Illinois. Thirty years later, Yosef has died, and Jonas needs to make sense of the volatile generational and cultural ties that have forged him. How can he envision his future without knowing what has come before? Leaving behind his marriage and job in New York, Jonas sets out to retrace his mother and father’s trip and weave together a family history that will take him from the war-torn Ethiopia of his parents’ youth to his life in the America of today, a story-real or invented – that holds the possibility of reconciliation and redemption.”

Both titles are available here at the Library, so come on by and take a look!

(Excerpts are from summaries provided by Syndetic Solutions.)

SCL Boredom-Buster #13: “Nobody Called Me Charlie,” by Charles Preston

Good morning, y’all! Today’s Boredom-Buster is:

Nobody called me Charlie: the story of a radical white journalist writing for a Black newspaper in the Civil Rights era, by Charles Preston.

  • In the 1940s, at the height of segregation, Charles Preston became the unlikely newest worker at a black owned-and-operated newspaper. Preston, a white man and, unbeknownst to most of his colleagues, a member of the Communist Party, quickly came face to face with issues of race and injustice that would profoundly impact his life and change the way he understood United States society. This fictionalized account . . . takes on the central question of this nation’s history: can a truly human and humane society be built on a foundation of profound and pervasive racial inequality? Of course, the answer is no. Yet how do we make such a society? Or put another way, how must white people try to live their lives and how must they connect with their black brothers and sisters, personally and politically, to make a world in which the horrible scars of racism are healed once and for all? The answer that shines through Preston’s book–whether he is writing (and reporting) about work, local politics, the civil rights struggle, housing, education, entertainment,travel, sports, business, child-rearing, friendship, or intimate relationships–is that whites must do what he did: give up their whiteness. This is a book you will not forget.” (Source Syndetic Solutions)

Enjoy! And don’t forget to tune in tomorrow for our next pick! 🙂

SCL Boredom-Buster #12: “Stereotyping Africa: surprising answers to surprising questions”

Here’s some Boredom-Busting food for thought! Check out today’s non-fiction SCL Pick, featuring a FAQs section on many common myths and stereotypes about Africa and Africans:


Stereotyping Africa: surprising answers to surprising questions, by Emmanuel Fru Doh

  • “Characteristically, Africans in any Western country are asked so many different questions about ‘Africa,’ as Westerners love to refer to the many countries that make up that huge continent, as if Africa were a single nation state. So one begins wondering why it is that Africans, on the other hand, do not refer to individual European countries as “Europe” simply, then the trends and consequences of stereotyping begin setting in just as one is getting used to being asked if Africa has a president, or if one can say something in African. It is some of these questions that Emmanuel Fru Doh has collected over the years and has attempted answering them in an effort to shed some light on a continent that is in many ways like the rest of the world, when not better, but which so many love to paint as dark, backward, chaotic, and pathetic.” (Source: Syndetic Solutions)

Happy reading!