Tag Archives: Women’s history

TOMORROW: “Tell About the South”, talk by UNC Park Fellow Lorraine Ahearn

For interested faculty and graduate students, UNC’s School of Journalism & Mass Communication is hosting an interesting talk taking place TOMORROW at NOON dealing with little-known details about NC’s Civil Rights history.

EVENT INFORMATION:

“Tell About the South” with Lorraine Ahearn, doctoral Park Fellow at the UNC School of Journalism & Mass Communication
Wednesday, December 01 2010
12:00pm-1:00pm
Open to graduate students & faculty.  Lunch will be served.  Seating is limited so please RSVP ASAP to 962-5665 or lbeavers@unc.edu

“In 1937, students from Bennett College for Women organized a boycott of white movie theaters in Greensboro, N.C., over Jim Crow-era censorship. Local theater owners were cutting movie scenes in which black actors played “non-traditional” roles that crossed the color line of segregation. What ensued was a media conflict on two fronts. First, white theater owners censored what they believed violated local custom, while African-American students organized the community to apply economic pressure for change.  On the second front, black newspapers including the Chicago Defender offered a narrative that clashed with the version the city’s white-owned newspaper told about the theater owners’ action. Ahearn’s research looks at the role of mass media imagery in early civil rights history, and how the two newspapers framed this incident in history.”

The full event announcement is available here.

WEDNESDAY: “Pauli Murray v. UNC: Wrestling with Change in the Jim Crow South”

As part of the Pauli Murray Centennial Celebration initiated by Duke University’s Human Rights Center, UNC will be hosting the panel discussion “Pauli Murray v. UNC: Wrestling with Change in the Jim Crow South”, which highlights Murray’s attempts to gain admittance for graduate work at UNC in 1938-39.  This is an event that aims “to teach the university community about this history and to encourage reflection on the story of Murray’s activism: what kind of example does she offer in our own time?”

Event Information:

Wednesday, Nov. 3, 2010
5:15 p.m. reception | 6 p.m. program

Wilson Special Collections Library, Pleasants Family Assembly Room

***FREE AND OPEN TO THE PUBLIC***

Contact Information: Center for the Study of the American South, (919) 962-4433

Genna Rae McNeil, professor of history at UNC-Chapel Hill, will moderate the panel discussion, which includes the following participants:

The event will also feature a small exhibit of archival materials from the Southern Historical Collection in UNC’s Wilson Special Collections Library highlighting this historical moment.

Sponsored by UNC’s Center for the Study of the American South, the Southern Historical Collection, The Pauli Murray Project/Duke Human Rights Center, the Carolina Women’s Center, the UNC School of Information and Library Science (grad student assistance), and the Sonja Haynes Stone Center for Black Culture and History at UNC (organizational and in-kind assistance).

Interested in learning more about the panelists?  Check out some of their books available at UNC libraries:

Hope to see you there!

The Pauli Murray Project

The Pauli Murray Project is based in nearby Durham, NC and is run by Duke University’s Human Rights Center. Their mission is “to build stronger ties between our Durham, North Carolina communities through dialogue, education, storytelling and the creation of new ways of telling our unique history. In this work we honor the legacy and values of one of Durham’s unsung heroes, lawyer, activist, poet and priest, Pauli Murray”. The project’s website contains a wealth of information on Murray: a detailed biography, timeline, a bibliography of her writings, and useful listing of works about her. Or click here for a 1 minute video summarizing the project.

The Pauli Murray project is particularly interested in community input and collaboration, including their 2007-09 series “Face Up: Telling Stories of Community”. There are plenty of ways to get involved – sign up for their email list or contact them about volunteer opportunities. You can also follow the Project on Facebook.

In addition to next week’s event at UNC’s Wilson Library, the Pauli Murray Project will be hosting several commemorative events throughout the month of November and beyond. Check out the Pauli Murray Centennial Celebration events calendar here for further information.

Just who was Pauli Murray?

Born in 1910, Anna Pauline (“Pauli”) Murray was raised in Durham, NC and became a trailblazing participant in the civil rights and women’s rights movements. Murray was a woman of many talents and passions: an activist, an educator, a lawyer, a poet, and – at age 67 – the first female African American Episcopal priest. She was valedictorian of her high school class, and went on to earn degrees from Hunter College, Howard Law School, UC Berkeley (LLM), and Yale (JSD & MDiv). Murray was a founding member of NOW (National Organization for Women) and in 1947 Mademoiselle magazine named her “Woman of the Year.”

Murray’s distinguished career came about despite numerous obstacles due to her race and gender. As an African American, she was refused entry to UNC’s School of Law. As a woman, graduating first in her class at Howard earned her a Rosenwald Fellowship to attend Harvard for graduate studies in law, but Harvard reneged on this honor because of her gender. These are but early examples of the kinds of discrimination Murray would encounter over the course of her illustrious career as a legal scholar, activist, and religious leader.

November 20th marks the centennial of Pauli Murray’s birth, and Duke University’s Human Rights Center has planned a host of events in collaboration with area institutions, including UNC. The first of these events will take place next week at Wilson Library.

In the meantime, if you’re interested in learning more about Pauli Murray…

Sources:
http://www.ncwriters.org/services/lhof/inductees/pmurray.htm
http://paulimurrayproject.org/pauli-murray/biography/
http://paulimurrayproject.org/pauli-murray/timeline/
http://www.lib.unc.edu/blogs/news/index.php/2010/10/pauli-murray/
http://www.biography.com/articles/Pauli-Murray-214111

Dorothy Height, 1912-2010

Learn more about the fascinating life of civil rights pioneer Dorothy Height by reading her memoir, Open Wide the Freedom Gates. A copy of the book is available in the Stone Center Library.

Several books by Height are available in electronic format via the library catalog. Search for “Height, Dorothy” in the catalog to bring up the results.

An obituary can be found online at the New York Times web site.

Collection Highlight – Special Collections, Duke University.

Duke University has posted an online archival collection focusing on African American Women’s History.  If you are interested in slave narratives and slave letters, it is worth a look.

If you are looking for assistance finding primary source documents on African American History, feel free to ask the Stone Center Library Staff.

Women’s History Month

In honor of Women’s History Month, Shauna Collier has put books pertaining to African American Women’s History on display.  Here are a few of the selections:

  • Black & Brown Waves: The Cultural Politics of Young Women of Color and Feminism by Regina Andrea Bernard.
  • Still Brave: The Evolution of Black Women’s Studies edited by Stanlie M. James, Frances Smith Foster, and Beverly Guy-Sheftall.
  • The Pecan Orchard: Journey of a Sharecropper’s Daughter by Peggy Vonsherie Allen.
  • Triangular Road by Paule Marshall.
  • Shaping Memories: Reflections of African American Women Writers edited by Joanne Veal Gabbin.

Please come into the library and take one out to enjoy over spring break! We are always ready to help patrons find interesting reads.