Tag Archives: William Shakespeare

Two Williams

In separate discussions, scholars speak of William Shakespeare and William Blake. First,¬†Maynard Mack¬†reflects on the influence of Shakespeare on the English language, saying that the wide vocabulary he used drew upon many idioms, and that he wrote about everyday people. … Continue reading

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Shakespeare’s “Green-ey’d Monster”

Lynda Boose and Margreta de Grazia discuss Othello, which is often considered to be the most popular of Shakespeare’s tragedies, yet is the object of continuing critical disparagement. Why is this so? How do the themes of human sexuality, love, … Continue reading

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The Play’s the Thing: Shakespeare Then and Now

April, 1985, marks the anniversaries–dating back to the years 1564 and 1616–of the birth and death of William Shakespeare, the Western world’s most popular poet and playwright. What account’s for Shakespeare’s popularity? Why is Shakespeare a cultural reference point? Lynda … Continue reading

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Notions of the Tragic in Western Literature, Part 4 of 4

Peter Burian, Eugene Falk, Peter Smith, and Robert ter Horst conclude their series on tragedy with this episode. They say that from antiquity through medieval, renaissance, and modern interpretations, conceptions of the tragic in Western literature have resisted specific definitions, … Continue reading

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