The Russians [Were] Coming! And They Had Maps.

A few years ago, the North Carolina Collection acquired a set of Soviet-made maps, featuring North Carolina towns and dating from the late 1970s. See if you can guess which town is pictured below (and the feature just to the top left of that town). The top image shows the name of the town, and the bottom image shows the town itself.

7 thoughts on “The Russians [Were] Coming! And They Had Maps.”

  1. I was a Russian major as an undergrad so I’ll keep my guess (my *correct* guess) to myself; it makes sense, though, and I’m sure we have similar maps of Джэксонвил.

  2. I don’t know Russian, but I just found this online system to the U.S. Geologic Survey photos. Do a keywod search on North Carolina!

    From the site:

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Central Regional Library maintains a collection of over 400,000 photographs taken during geologic studies of the United States and its territories from 1868 to the present.

    These images provide a visual history of the discovery, development, and sciences of the United States and its Geological Survey. Some photographs have been used in USGS publications, but most have never been published.

    Currently, this website represents less than 10 percent of the Library’s images with approximately 30,000 photographs on-line.
    http://infodocket.com/2011/04/28/wow-reference-shelf-u-s-geological-survey-photographic-library/

  3. Everyone knew Winston-Salem was a primary Russian target, because how could we fight a war without cigarettes and underwear?

  4. I love the idea of an attic sale, but the truth is that we purchased these from East View Cartographic (http://www.cartographic.com/) about ten years ago. We bought about twenty maps, covering the coast, some majors cities, and at least one city near a major military installation (hint).

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