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Fan with images of Martin Luther King Jr, John F. Kennedy, and Robert Kennedy

Verso of fan with words "Franklin Funeral Home" and "Franklin, N.C."

The Kennedys and Martin Luther King have long been an iconographic trio, not only visually but also musically (with Lincoln). Sometimes Dr. King had the fan all to himself.

Distributed by Franklin Funeral Home in Franklinton.

Ribbon for Woman's Christian Temperance Union

“The Women’s Christian Temperance Union, the most prominent temperance society in North Carolina after the Civil War, was organized at Greensboro in 1883 by Frances E. Willard, president of the national WCTU. Its wide range of reform programs included women suffrage, equal rights, child welfare, prison life, international arbitration, world peace, narcotics and tobacco control, child labor, juvenile delinquency, prostitution, and gambling. Two WCTU publications appeared in the state: the Anchor and the North Carolina White Ribbon.”
— From “Temperance Movement” (2006) by Wiley J. Williams in the Encyclopedia of North Carolina

Booklet from Woman's Christian Temperance Union meeting in Winston-Salem in November 1906
A booklet accompanying this ribbon from the 1906 state convention in Winston-Salem included the lyrics to “Prohibition Forever.”
Chorus:
“Hurrah, hurrah!
“Prohibition forever,
“Hurrah! hurrah!
“In the good Old North State.”

Pinback for Cotton Gining Days 24th Annual show on October 7 through 9, 2011. Pinback features an image of a cotton gin.
“This festival was started in 1988 to preserve the heritage of blue-collar workers in the South and provide patrons an experience of life as it was lived in the late 1800s and early 1900s around Gaston County. The focal point of this annual 3-day fall festival is a restored operational cotton gin on permanent exhibit in the Gaston County Park in Dallas. Today more than 50,000 people are drawn here to see more than 300 exhibits of antique agricultural and textile machinery from all over the Southeast.”

— Gaston County Parks and Recreation Department

Several new titles were just added to New in the North Carolina Collection. To see the full list simply click on the link in the entry or click on the New in the North Carolina Collection tab at the top of the page. As always, full citations for all the new titles can be found in the University Library Catalog, and all titles are available for use in the Wilson Special Collections Library.

Front license plate that reads, "Beaufort N.C., Delightfully Different"

Among places from which Bo-fort, North Carolina, is delightfully different: Bew-fort, South Carolina.

Label that reads "Fresh Kinoca" for Kinston Produce Marketing Company

Kinston Produce Marketing Co. obviously covered a lot of ground, but this label likely was meant for a vegetable crate.

Thanks to Richard Garafolo, director of the Learning Resources Center at Lenoir Community College, for tracking the etymology of Kinoca: “I have talked with several members of a group that meets in our Heritage Place genealogy center.  They believe this is an acronym – ‘Ki’ for Kinston, ‘no’ for North and ‘ca’ for Carolina.”

Pinback featuring illustration of Winston Eagle hydroplane and the line "Now You're Smokin"

“NASCAR was its showpiece property, but [RJR] underwrote 55 other events and sports teams: Camel Biker Rallies, Camel Smokin’ Joe’s [previously Winston Eagle] hydroplane, Vantage golf championships, Salem ProSail, RJ Gold Bass Tournaments, Doral Skiing and more.

“Says H.A. ‘Humpy’ Wheeler, president of Charlotte’s Lowe’s Motor Speedway, ‘When they write the history of marketing in the 20th century, R.J. Reynolds will be looked at as one of the most prolific marketing entities Western civilization ever had. They’ll be held up like Thomas Edison’s light bulb.’ ”

— From “The last beauty standing” by Liz Clarke in the Washington Post (Nov. 16, 2003)

 

Ink blotter with words Carolina cultures and showing images of microscopic organisms

“While teaching at Elon and working towards the doctorate at Duke, Powell perceived the need for a biological supply house that could provide schools and colleges with their laboratory specimens. At the time, only two other businesses in the United States supplied specimens for classroom use — teachers were expected to collect their own protozoan, frogs, and animal skeletons.

“Powell began his business on a part-time basis in 1927 in a woodshed beside a pond at Elon College. Nine years later he resigned his teaching position to devote full time to management of the growing company.”

— From Thomas Edward Powell Jr.’s entry (1994)  by George W. Troxler in the Dictionary of North Carolina Biography

This ink blotter promotes the company as “a dependable culture service.”

LaGrange, NC license tag

“[Oscar Herring of the La Grange Chamber of Commerce] said it is believed La Grange got its [nickname] from an African-American train porter.

” ‘As the story goes, every time the train would roll into town, this porter would call out “La Grange, La Grange — The Garden Spot.” ‘

“Herring said several families have claimed to be related to the porter in question. ‘It starts too much trouble to try and narrow it down to one family,’ he said.”

— From “Festival to honor those who served” by Jon Dawson in the Kinston Free Press (Sept. 9, 2010)
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Several new titles were just added to New in the North Carolina Collection. To see the full list simply click on the link in the entry or click on the New in the North Carolina Collection tab at the top of the page. As always, full citations for all the new titles can be found in the University Library Catalog, and all titles are available for use in the Wilson Special Collections Library.

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