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Newspaper rack card that reads, "Billy Graham Crusade, Special Keepsake Section, Tuesday, October 1, 1996
“Billy Graham may have paved the way for rock concerts at Ericsson [now Bank of America] Stadium.

“After dismantling equipment for Graham’s Carolinas crusade, officials found the field in good condition, alleviating a major concern about holding nonfootball events at the stadium….

“For organizers, the extra time and money it took to convert Ericsson was well worth it….In three offerings the crusade brought in more than $800,000, and 305,400 people attended the four-day crusade.”

— From “Stadium held up well under crusade” by Ky Henderson in the Charlotte Observer (Oct. 1, 1996)

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Pennant reading "Asheville Rhododendron Festival."

“The Rhododendron Festival was started in June 1928 by the Chamber of Commerce to bring more tourism to Asheville and lasted until 1942 when the U.S. went to war. At its height it was a weeklong event featuring a parade every day, beauty pageants and upscale balls….

“It was also designed to showcase the rich traditions of southern Appalachia…. Bascom Lamar Lunsford of Mars Hill was the principal organizer of the Appalachian music events and successfully spun off the Mountain Dance and Folk Festival….

“The festival crowned a King and Queen of Rhododendron, a mythical fairyland built in the baseball diamond at McCormick Field…. Dogs and livestock were also paraded around and judged….”

— From “The Rhododendron Festival”  by Cliff Mori at brew-ed.com

Asheville historian Nan Chase notes that the festival “started during a period people were so destitute that men were hunting squirrels in town for food and picking up coal along the railroad tracks to sell. I call it a ‘pageant of hope.’ “

Chase also happened onto an early mention of Billie Burke – later Glinda the Good Witch in “The Wizard of Oz” — tap-dancing at a festival pageant atop the Grove Arcade.

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Pinback that reads "Pat McCrory,City Council at Large."

These two pinbacks bookend the political career (so far) of Pat McCrory. In 1989 as a Republican newcomer he was elected to an at-large seat on Charlotte City Council, which led first to 14 years as mayor and then to a single, HB2-marred term as governor.

Anti-McCrory pinback that reads "Flush McCrory and the GOP" and shows a toilet.

Sharing a plug for the annual Greensboro show of the American Political Items Collectors (of which I am a member):

“More than 50 tables of political buttons, campaign posters, presidential souvenirs, advertising pinbacks, Civil War militaria, vintage photographs, postcards, anti-war, social justice, women’s suffrage, sports, and cause-related, and pop culture collectibles will be available to buy and trade.

“Free appraisals of historical items by experts. Open to the public. General admission $3, kids and students free.”

The show is Saturday 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. at the Wyndham Garden Greensboro Hotel.

 

Front license plate reading "Bailey, Home of the Country Doctor Museum."Bailey, a town of 500-plus in Nash County, has been the museum’s home since its founding in 1967 by Josephine E. Newell, seventh in a line of country doctors. In 2003, however, local volunteers turned over stewardship to the Medical Foundation of East Carolina University.

Mecklenburg County has its own – much smaller — Mint Hill Country Doctor’s Museum. 

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Decal reading "Chickadee, State Bird, North Carolina."

Word seems not to have reached the decal factory that the chickadee’s reign as state bird was short indeed.

Ten years later the cardinal was chosen and to date has not been challenged.

Pinback with Stop HB2 and created by Replacements Ltd.
 
For months, an electronic billboard on Interstate 40-85 east of Greensboro said ‘Repeal HB2.’
“Now that House Bill 2 has been repealed and replaced by a new state law, the billboard’s message has also been replaced: ‘Never Compromise On Civil Rights.’
“The billboard is owned by Bob Page, the outspoken CEO of Replacements, Ltd., a company that sells old and new china, silver and other collectibles.
“Page, who is gay, is a vocal supporter of LGBT rights and has used billboards to broadcast his message to the thousands of passing cars on the busy Guilford County freeway.”

— From “ ‘Never Compromise On Civil Rights,’ says billboard blasting HB2 deal” by Colin Campbell in the News & Observer (April 18, 2017)

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Read more here: https://www.newsobserver.com/news/politics-government/state-politics/article145113099.html#storylink=cpy
Pinback for Martin Luther King visit to Reynolds Coliseum

“Nearly forgotten, Dr. King spoke in Raleigh to an integrated audience of about 5,000 at Reynolds Coliseum at 4 p.m. on July 31, 1966. A counter-protest began two hours earlier with speeches at Memorial Auditorium and continued with a march by members from two factions of the Ku Klux Klan….

“King spoke against ‘Black supremacy’ in Raleigh because Stokely Carmichael had stirred crowds just weeks before in Mississippi by repeating violent declarations of  ‘Black Power.’ He also declared. ‘The Negro needs the white man to save him from his fear, and the white man needs the Negro to save him from his guilt.’ ”

— From “When MLK and the KKK met in Raleigh” by W. Jason Miller in the News & Observer (April 3, 2018)

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Several new titles were just added to New in the North Carolina Collection. To see the full list simply click on the link in the entry or click on the New in the North Carolina Collection tab at the top of the page. As always, full citations for all the new titles can be found in the University Library Catalog, and all titles are available for use in the Wilson Special Collections Library.

“A 1928 advertisement for Lucky Strike cigarettes said, ‘Reach for a Lucky instead of a sweet,’ until the confection industry threatened legal action. In 1930, the ad was rewritten to say, ‘We do not represent that smoking Lucky Strike Cigarettes will bring modern figures or cause the reduction of flesh. We do declare that when tempted to do yourself too well, if you will “Reach for a Lucky” instead, you will thus avoid over-indulgence in things that cause excess weight and, by avoiding over-indulgence, maintain a modern, graceful form.’

“There is some truth to this claim, says George Bray, professor of medicine at the Pennington Biomedical Research Center in Baton Rouge, since cigarettes do ‘stimulate energy expenditure’ (or burn calories) and probably do substitute for snacking for some users. And those who quit smoking do tend to gain weight when they replace the oral gratification of smoking with eating. But no one can call cigarette usage a healthy approach.”

— From “From Lucky Strikes to tapeworms: 7 of the oddest weight-loss schemes of the past were also unhealthy” by Debra Bruno in the Washington Post (Jan. 27)

 

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