New in the collection: Dairy coupon booklet

The cover of a book of milk coupons. It includes an illustration of a cow and the words "Thirty quarts. The coupons in this book are good for the face value in payment of all dairy products. Meadow Brook Farms. Gerton, N.C. Telephone three."

Image of a page of five coupons.

Somehow this booklet of coupons good for 30 quarts of milk has gone unused — but redemption today seems unlikely given the disappearance of Meadow Brook Farms from Gerton, an unincorporated community (population: 254)  in Henderson County.

The back cover advises: “To make our coupon system effective, please place coupons under the milk bottle each day. Your strict compliance with this rule will be appreciated….”

But my favorite line is “Telephone: 3.”

 

New in the collection: Nathanael Greene beer label

Beer bottle label with a portrait of Nathaniel Greene and the words "Natty Greene's Brewing Company. Guilford Golden Ale."

Should Greensboro historians be offended to see a local craft brewery cheekily refer to its revered general as Natty? I don’t think so!

Nor do I think megabrewer Anheuser-Busch should have challenged — unsuccessfully — Natty Greene’s trademark application just because its own brand roster had staked out Natty Light, Fatty Natty and Natty Daddy.

Nevertheless….

 

New in the collection: Milk bottle lids

Old style lids for milk jugs from four North Carolina dairies

After giving way to paper and then plastic versions, glass milk bottles have made something of a comeback — but without the cardboard disc lids of earlier days.

Here’s a colorful sample of lids from Terra Ceia Dairy, Pine State Creamery, Southern Dairies and Durham Dairy Products. 

New in the collection: Randy Travis souvenir sticker

A sticker with a photograph of Randy Travis and the words, "ninety-nine point nine KISS country welcomes Randy Travis to South Florida. Miccousukee Indian Freedom Festival. July 11, 1996."

“Randy Travis changed the course of pop-leaning country music in 1986 with the release of his multiplatinum-selling ‘Storms of Life.’ In the next three decades, he charted 16 No. 1 songs including ‘Forever and Ever, Amen,’ ‘Deeper than a Holler’ and ‘On the Other Hand.’

“ ‘I can’t find another artist in any format in the history of music that turned a format 180 degrees right back into itself, a mirror of what it was, and made it bigger than it was before,’ Garth Brooks told The Tennessean.”

— From “Randy Travis opens up about childhood trauma, addiction struggles and the music industry in new memoir” by Cindy Watts in the Nashville Tennessean (June 5, 2019)

At the time of this concert the 37-year-old Marshville native had no reason to suspect his best decade was already behind him.

 

New in the collection: Ku Klux Klan business cards

Three business cards for Ku Klux Klan organizations. One card includes the words "Realm of North Carolina, United Klans of America," an illustration of a Klansman on horseback and a name and address in Rockwell, NC. A second card also includes an illustration of a klansman on horseback and a message that reads, "You have been paid a social visit by the Knights of the Ku Klux Klan. Don't make the next visit a business call." The third card includes an illustration of a Klansman on horseback and the message, "one dollar donation. Thanks for purchasing a brick to help build a building for the Knights of the Ku Klux Klan."

The membership applications on the backs of these undated cards list either a post office box in Granite Quarry, a longtime center of Klan activity, or one in nearby Rockwell.

The “social visit” card — no membership application included — is especially chilling, isn’t it?

 

New in the collection: WITN-TV desktop calendar

Calendar stand with a television tower next to the Empire State Building and the Eiffel Tower. The words, "The high and the mighty," are next to the structures. The stand also includes the words "7 WITN-TV TV for Eastern North Carolina."

“Channel 7 has had three broadcast towers over the years in Grifton. The original one of 919 feet was the tallest in the market at the time. It was replaced in 1961 with a 1,549-foot tower, and then in 1978, the current 2,000 foot structure was erected.”

— From “WITN History: A Look At How We Began In 1955” at witn.com

How proud did the Greenville station feel about that 1,549-foot tower?  Proud enough to label it “The High and the Mighty” — and to point out its supremacy to the Empire State Building (1,454 feet), the Eiffel Tower (1,063 feet) and the Washington Monument (555 feet). 

 

New in the collection: Brown Lung Association pinback

Burgundy pinback with the words, "Cotton Dust Kills. Carolina Brown Lung Association."

“Textile workers asked Congress today to pass laws that would upgrade state compensation for disabled employees with brown lung and other occupational diseases.

“The Carolina Brown Lung Association believes federal legislation is necessary because state compensation laws are not working and the textile industry is using its power and money to fight claims.

– From “Textile Workers Press for Upgraded Brown Lung Compensation” by Janet Staihar of the Associated Press (March 26, 1980)

 

The Charlotte Observer today won the 1981 Pulitzer Prize for meritorious public service for its series on brown lung disease….

“Industry and government responded with anger and resistance, but changes occurred…. By the end of 1980, textile workers in North Carolina had received a record $4 million in workers’ compensation for brown lung — more than the total paid in the previous nine years.”

— From “Charlotte (N.C.) Observer wins Pulitzer” by UPI (April 13, 1981)

 

New in the collection: Swinging bridge pinback

Pinback featuring a colored image of the swinging bridge and the words "I crossed the Mile High Swing Bridge. Grandfather Mountain, N.C."

“The swinging bridge was one of two options when [Hugh] Morton decided to get visitors from the gift shop-museum parking lot to the rocky overlook. ‘We had to have some way to get them across, and we could either have a stationary bridge or a swinging bridge,’ he said. ‘We decided the swinging bridge would be more fun, and would make a good conversation piece.’
“Some 30 percent of women visitors, and a smaller percentage of males, however, think it best not to cross the bridge.”

— From the Greensboro Daily News (Oct. 1, 1978) via A View to Hugh

 

New in the collection: Lizard Lick Towing plaque

Football shaped plaque with the embossed words, "Lizard Lick Towing."

” ‘Lizard Lick Towing’ makes ‘Jersey Shore’ look like a Martha Stewart episode.

“Drawing its name from the nearby crossroads community about 20 miles east of Raleigh, Lizard Lick Towing & Recovery is the enterprise of Ron and Amy Shirley…

“Wendell’s Chamber of Commerce isn’t trumpeting the news of a cable show being taped in its precincts, and the antics of the stars can’t be expected to pull many viewers off PBS.

“But for the low-falutin’ crowd, it’s the place to be. Brawls, bash-ups and a tow truck, too — too good to be true. And after a few minutes, you’ll doubt that is.”

— From “Out of Lizard Lick, something tasteless” by Mark Washburn in the Charlotte Observer (Feb. 12, 2011)

“Lizard Lick Towing” is long gone from cable, but this oddball, perhaps homemade wooden plaque remains. And so does the business itself.

 

New in the collection: Lumberton license plate

Front license plate with the words "Lumberton, The Progressive City."

Just as local license plates once touted friendliness — Randleman, “City of Friendly People,” and Zebulon, “Town of Friendly People” — so too did they claim progressiveness.

While Lumberton basks in today’s Miscellany spotlight, we could have just as easily recognized Ayden (“Progressive Community”), Dunn (“Pattern for Progress”), Simpson (“Together for Progress”) or Ahoskie and Statesville (each a “City of Progress”).