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Archive for September, 2006

Biltmore in 1905

George Washington Vanderbilt was the youngest of his parents’ eight children. Because of the age difference between George and his siblings, some of his closest family ties were with his nieces and nephews. One niece, Edith Shepard Fabbri, visited Biltmore in late 1905 with her husband, Ernesto G. Fabbri, and their two children. Ernesto Fabbri, […]

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This is a great season for reading North Carolina literature, with new novels by some of the state’s most respected writers coming out within a few weeks of each other. Lee Smith’s On Agate Hill, set in Civil War era Hillsborough, has just been released and Doug Marlette’s Magic Time comes out this week. Follow […]

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Of Radio and Rain

As an undergraduate I took a “Weather and Climate” class, which I have to admit was one of my favorites. I don’t remember everything we discussed, but I definitely do remember that precipitation has nothing to do with radio waves in the air. This fact was called to doubt, however, as I was reviewing the […]

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This great advertisement is from a promotional brochure published by the Chesapeake and Ohio lines — the “C and O.” I ran across the brochure in a volume labeled simply “Miscellaneous Pamphlets.” The volume bears the signature and date “R.G. Cherry October 10 1931.” At the time, Cherry was in his first term in the […]

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Bigfoot in N.C.

Today’s Asheville Citizen-Times reports on the recent Bigfoot sightings in Madison County. Apparently, Sasquatch himself has appeared around the mountain town of Hot Springs. This is exciting news indeed, but I was most impressed to learn that this is not Bigfoot’s first visit to our state. The Bigfoot Field Researchers Organization has an excellent website […]

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Historical Markers Online

Our friends at the North Carolina Office of Archives & History have just released an impressive new website at http://ncmarkers.com. The site taps into a database of information about the North Carolina Historical Marker Program — those black and silver signs scattered along highways around the state denoting historic people and events. Users of the […]

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Donuts

I’ve just been looking through John T. Edge’s latest, Donuts: An American Passion. Despite the fact that there are no North Carolina places listed in his “Black Book of Donut Shops” (the closest place to us is Mulligan’s in suburban Atlanta), that hardly means we’re suffering a donut deficiency here. Of course, everyone knows that […]

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Books in Burnsville

Does any other state have as many literary festivals as North Carolina? We knew about the big North Carolina Literary Festival held every other year in the Triangle, and the annual Novello Festival in Charlotte, but we just learned about another one. The Carolina Mountains Literary Festival will be held September 15-16 in Burnsville. They […]

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This Month in North Carolina History In the late summer of 1711, John Lawson, Surveyor-General of North Carolina, and Baron Christoph von Graffenried, a Swiss aristocrat, began what should have been a short, uneventful trip up the Neuse River. Lawson assured his companion that they would have no trouble with the Native Americans in the […]

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