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Archive for November, 2009

In an undated 20th Century essay by Olive F. Gunby titled “Courtship in Carolina,” the author describes the socially appropriate way of wooing a proper North Carolina lady. The courtship, as described by Gunby, should naturally begin when the gentleman invites the lady for a ride in his buggy after church.  As the relationship progresses, […]

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“In 1840 U.S. census takers…recorded 9 percent of adult whites as illiterate…. “In New England no state had less than 98 percent literacy, which equaled [world leaders] Scotland and Sweden. “The state with the highest white illiteracy was North Carolina: 28 percent. The public school system called for in the state constitution of 1776 had never been implemented. However, in […]

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“[Three months later] there was a cave-in in a North Carolina mine in which 71 men were caught and 53 actually lost. It attracted no great  notice. It was ‘just a mine disaster.’ “Yet for more than two weeks the plight of a single commonplace prospector for tourists [near Mammoth Cave] had riveted the  attention of the […]

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New Harriet Jacobs Website

Check out this new Harriet Jacobs website, hosted by the Edenton-Chowan County Tourism Development Authority.  It’s a great resource for information about Jacobs, the runaway slave and abolitionist from Edenton, North Carolina.  The website contains a biography of Jacobs, historic maps of Edenton, NC, curriculum for North Carolina fourth and eighth grade classrooms, and suggestions […]

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“Instead of an Ivy League university, [Robert Moses’ grandson Christopher Collins] wanted to go to little Chapel Hill College in North Carolina; [his mother] Jane was appalled, but Moses told her, ‘Oh, let the boy go where he wants.’” –From “The Power Broker: Robert Moses and the Fall of New York” (1974)

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Above is a postcard published by the Asheville Postcard Co., which was likely made from a photograph taken by George Masa. The writers of NC Miscellany recently got a tip that Buncombe County Public Libraries has an online display of several of George Masa’s photographs paired with the postcards that were printed from them.  You […]

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On this day in 1931 Amelia Earhart, on a promotional tour for Beech-Nut chewing gum, landed her autogiro on the dirt field at Charlotte’s privately owned airport. During her three-day stopover she demonstrated the experimental “flying windmill,” attended a United Relief Drive luncheon, made a sidetrip to Fayetteville for Armistice Day ceremonies and endeared herself […]

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Inscribed: “A toll gate on the Blowing Rock – Lenoir Turnpike (?), 4000 ft. above sea level. Photography by Miss Juliana Royster, Raleigh, N.C.”

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“One day not long after his installation [as assistant secretary of the Navy], he and [Secretary of the Navy Josephus] Daniels posed on an upper-floor porch looking down on the executive mansion. The prints came back, and Daniels showed the best one to Roosevelt. “‘Franklin,’ he asked, ‘why are you grinning from ear to ear, looking […]

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Be sure to check out the new This Month in North Carolina, in which Harry McKown examines the Colored Industrial Association Fair.  The Colored Industrial Fair occurred occurred on November 18, 1879, in Raleigh and displayed the achievements of the African American population in North Carolina. … This makes an interesting follow-up to last month’s […]

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