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Archive for March, 2016

North Carolina Historic Newspapers is well underway contributing newspapers to the Library of Congress’ Chronicling America newspaper website during its second phase of digitization. There are now 127,225 historic North Carolina newspaper pages available on the site. The above masthead is from the Banner-Enteprise, a late 19th-century African-American publication out of Raleigh, then Wilmington. It […]

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The North Carolina Heritage Award has been awarded to traditional artists since its inception in 1989. North Carolina has a rich heritage of folk and heritage arts, ranging from pottery to dance. Some of the award winners are internationally known for their craft, such as Doc Watson and Jim Shumate, whereas others have practiced their […]

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“By drawing those at the lower end of the economic scale into an illicit enterprise, bootlegging and moonshining in the Jim Crow South had the unintended effect of blurring lines of segregation…. “The African-American newspaper the Pittsburgh Courier reported with dry humor one North Carolina reference: ‘If white and Negro preachers understood each other and […]

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Our March Artifact of the Month is a UNC sweatshirt that saw two generations of UNC basketball championship wins — and carries the spray paint to prove it. Wynne Maynor Miller bought this faded Carolina blue shirt during her freshman year in 1982 and was wearing it as she celebrated UNC’s 1985 championship victory on […]

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On this day in 1705: Newly appointed deputy governor Thomas Cary, son-in-law of a Quaker, disappoints N.C. Quakers by refusing to change a policy that effectively bars them from holding public office. By 1711, however, Cary will have allied with the Quakers and undertaken a bizarrely inept armed rebellion against the government. He is arrested […]

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“While Lincoln was meeting with his cabinet [on April 14, 1865, the day before his assassination], everyone’s mind was on North Carolina, for Confederate forces were there were holding out in Raleigh, and word was awaited imminently from General Sherman, whose job it was to subdue those holdouts and bring the war formally to an […]

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“The vast majority of black Southerners worked as tenants (renters), sharecroppers, or wage hands. Even within the same place, however, different arrangements were possible. “As early as 1867, a North Carolina planter reported that most of his workers labored for a share of the crop, ‘but I also have about 15 good men at wages.’ […]

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“There had been pious concern [at the University of North Carolina] that French taught by a Frenchman might inculcate immoralities. The university’s president, David Swain, recommended to the Board of Trustees that any tutor would have to be ‘an educated American.’ This nativist injunction may not have been unconnected with the sad tale of Charles […]

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On this day in 1956: A subcommittee of the House Un-American Activities Committee convenes in Charlotte. Two days of hearings will single out Bill McGirt, a poet working at a Winston-Salem fish market, as the state’s top communist, but he and 10 other subpoenaed witnesses refuse to testify, and little new information surfaces. “The conclusion […]

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One dish wonders!

Casseroles from Favorite recipes of the Lower Cape Fear. Reunion Casserole from Columbus County cookbook II. Reuben Casserole from Home cookin’. Shrimp Celebration Casserole from Company’s coming : a recipe collection from North Carolinians who enjoy company coming. Casseroni from The clock watcher’s cook book. Helen Scarboro’s Captivating Chicken Casserole from A dash of Down East. Hot Fruit Casserole from What’s cookin’? in 1822.

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