Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Archive for January, 2012

Blue Mass

There are a lot of curiosities in the old newspapers we’re digitizing, but rarely do I come across any complete mysteries like this ad, which I found in the Fayetteville Observer from January 8, 1863. Do any of you know anything about Blue Mass?

Read Full Post »

On this day in 1990: Dr. Henry Stenhouse, a Goldsboro ophthalmologist, announces his candidacy for Congress. At 100, Stenhouse is perhaps the oldest person ever to run for office in North Carolina. “I’m a revolutionary,” says Stenhouse, who opposes welfare, seat-belt laws and AIDS research. After a campaign that includes an appearance on “The Tonight […]

Read Full Post »

“In the last part of the show… Colbert typically leaps up from his desk and bounds across the set to a table in front of a fireplace with the Latin motto ‘Videri quam esse’ (“To seem to be, rather than to be”), where he interviews a guest about a new book or movie….” – From […]

Read Full Post »

Several new titles just added to “New in the North Carolina Collection?” To see the full list simply click on the link in this entry or click on the “New in the North Carolina Collection?” tab at the top of this page. As always, full citations for all the new titles can be found in […]

Read Full Post »

The hat tip I extended to comics historian Allan Holtz for his research on Caro-Graphics was inadequate to begin with. Now Allan has added to his Stripper’s Guide blog a fascinating — and surprising — profile of Murray Jones Jr., primary artist for the 1930s newspaper panel depicting a predigital North Carolina miscellany. Jones, we […]

Read Full Post »

“[In 1941, while Ringling Bros. and Barnum & Bailey was] touring the South, 11 elephants died suddenly, most of them during their Atlanta stand. Autopsies revealed the animals had consumed large amounts of arsenic. At first a member of the circus train crew was arrested on suspicion of poisoning, but charges were dropped. Police picked […]

Read Full Post »

If today’s headlines have you down, trying reading old news instead. The NC Digital Heritage Center makes its first foray into Twitter with @ncnewspapers, where we’ll be tweeting a historic headline every day from that day in history. The stories we feature will span the full range of North Carolina history from the 19th and […]

Read Full Post »

Does this sound familiar? The most odious feature in this system is that it robs the MANY, imperceptibly, to enrich the FEW;–It clothes a few wealthy individuals with power not only to control the wages of the laboring man, but also at their pleasure to inflate or depress the commerce and business of the whole […]

Read Full Post »

“Senate rules forbade members from speaking more than twice per day on a given piece of legislation, but a senator was free to offer as many amendments to the bill as he wished and could then  speak twice on each amendment. …. [Preparing to filibuster FDR's plan to 'pack' the Supreme Court, Senator Edward Burke […]

Read Full Post »

“An expeditionary force of 15,000 [Union troops] landed at Roanoke Island in early 1862 and spent much of the war enforcing a naval blockade from a fort on the coastline. The air at dusk shimmered with Anopheles quadrimaculatus. Between the summer of 1863 and the summer of 1864 the official annual infection rate  for intermittent […]

Read Full Post »

« Newer Posts