Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Archive for February, 2018

“In 1861, [Dan] Sickles organized militia for the Union effort, and the next year was appointed brigadier general under Gen. Joseph Hooker in the Army of the Potomac. He rose to major general… and notoriously defied his commanding generals’ instructions at key battles. At Gettysburg, a cannonball mangled Sickles’ right leg, and it had to be amputated. “Sickles donated his […]

Read Full Post »

Chitterlings/chitlins, a notoriously pungent exemplar of Southern cuisine, are seldom seen (or sniffed) these days.  (None too soon, my mother would’ve said. Not my father, who took advantage of her absences to boil up a bucket of hog intestines and have his pals over to share.) One early reference to the chitterling strut, as a […]

Read Full Post »

“Sarepta Revis was a 17-year-old newlywed when her husband left their [Henderson County] North Carolina home to fight in the Confederate States Army. Neither had much schooling, and writing did not come easily to them. Still, they exchanged letters with some regularity, telling each other how they were doing, expressing their love and longing. Once, […]

Read Full Post »

1. Which of these is not true about Pineville native James K. Polk? A. He was the first president to retire voluntarily after his first term. B. He was the only president to have served as speaker of the House. C. He died sooner after leaving office than any other president. D. He was the […]

Read Full Post »

As everywhere else in the state, public opinion on HB2 in Forsyth County was starkly split. In a one-day special session on March 23, 2016, the N.C. General Assembly had reversed a Charlotte ordinance  expanding gay and transgender protections — most controversially, the right to use public restrooms based on gender identity. Gov. Pat McCrory […]

Read Full Post »

1. True or false: After the U.S. declared war on Germany in 1917, more than 100 percent of eligible N.C. men signed up for the draft. 2. Until the mid-1950s blacks were barred from Freedom Park in Charlotte, unless the men were laborers or the women were — ? 3. During a 1987 promotional tour […]

Read Full Post »

Can’t beat this poster for capturing its era, both in content and  design. Signed by “Bellows” — ring a bell with anyone? Gloria Steinem visited campus as part of a 1974 Women’s Festival. “All feminists are viewed as angry and difficult, but they’re not,” she told a press conference. “We enjoy the movement; it makes […]

Read Full Post »

1. The term “Final Four” was first used to describe the NCAA basketball championship held in what city? 2. True or false: Chautauquas, a popular adult education movement in the late 1800s and early 1900s, owe their name to an Indian village in North Carolina. 3. In Bruce Springsteen’s “Cadillac Ranch” (1980) who is “runnin’ […]

Read Full Post »

. As early as 1913, North Carolina municipalities were empowered to collect local taxes by issuing license plates. The most recent I’ve seen: Blowing Rock 2010. Most only named the town, but some took the opportunity to self-promote. Take that, Wilson and Tarboro and Rocky Mount!  

Read Full Post »

“In the 1920s, the journalist Nell Battle Lewis of North Carolina never questioned the absolute need for racial segregation even as she criticized the violence committed in the name of Jim Crow. Staying in the racial fold, she was afforded the opportunity to blast her state’s regressive labor and gender politics. Being a white supremacist, […]

Read Full Post »

Older Posts »