Photos of the week: life according to Photo-Sound Associates

 

20239_pf0101_01_0002. Lee Hoffman and John Schuyler "Jock" Root at the races. Photo by Aaron Rennert, ca. 1957-1960.  Photo-Sound Associates, Ron Cohen Collection (20239). Southern Folklife Collection, UNC Chapel Hill

20239_pf0101_01_0002. Lee Hoffman and John Schuyler “Jock” Root at the races. Photo by Aaron Rennert, ca. 1957-1960.  Photo-Sound Associates, Ron Cohen Collection (20239).

It’s hard not to get drawn into the Photo-Sound Associates images in the Ron Cohen Collection (20239). My intention is always to grab a quick photo to share on the blog and before I know it, I’ve grabbed six. I started off with the image above including the Caravan magazine founder and renaissance woman Lee Hoffman (ed. note: I recommend reading her website, Ms. Hoffman led a remarkable life) at some car races. I was looking for a different Washington Square Park photo when I saw the image below with the enormous crowd on a spring day. I can’t imagine the sound of that environment in the middle of the city. The street scenes documented by Rennert and photographer Ray Sullivan provide a fascinating look into New York City in the late 1950s. Framing musician Eric Weissberg and his Puch/Allstate 250CC two-stroke motorbike in the distance allows for a wonderful view of the architecture and 1950s automobiles. Finally, the image of Izzy Young through the window at the Folklore Center seemed the perfect way to end the tour along with this tired cat, so sleepy. The folk scene in NYC was a happening place to be in the late 1950s.

20239_pf0102_02_0003. Car races. Photo by Aaron Rennert, ca. 1957-1960.  Photo-Sound Associates, Ron Cohen Collection (20239). Southern Folklife Collection, UNC Chapel Hill20239_pf0102_02_0003. Car races. Photo by Aaron Rennert, ca. 1957-1960. Photo-Sound Associates, Ron Cohen Collection (20239).

 

20239_pf0082_01_0006. Crowd in Washington Square Park, 5 May 1959. Photo by Aaron Rennert. Photo-Sound Associates, Ron Cohen Collection (20239). Southern Folklife Collection, UNC Chapel Hill20239_pf0082_01_0006. Crowd in Washington Square Park, 5 May 1959. Photo by Aaron Rennert. Photo-Sound Associates, Ron Cohen Collection (20239).

 

20239_pf0082_01_0010. Listeners, small boy playing harmonica, Washington Square Park, 5 May 1959. Photo by Aaron Rennert. Photo-Sound Associates, Ron Cohen Collection (20239). Southern Folklife Collection, UNC Chapel Hill20239_pf0082_01_0010. Listeners, small boy playing harmonica, Washington Square Park, 5 May 1959. Photo by Aaron Rennert. Photo-Sound Associates, Ron Cohen Collection (20239).

 

20239_pf0098_01_0013. Eric Weissberg and his Puch/Allstate 250cc two-stroke motorbike. Photo by "LH," ca. 1957-1960.  Photo-Sound Associates, Ron Cohen Collection (20239). Southern Folklife Collection, UNC Chapel Hill20239_pf0098_01_0013. Eric Weissberg and his Puch/Allstate 250cc two-stroke motorbike. Photo by “LH,” ca. 1957-1960. Photo-Sound Associates, Ron Cohen Collection (20239).

 

20239_pf0100_0015. Izzy Young looking in the Folklore Center, 27 July 1959. Photo by Aaron Rennert. Photo-Sound Associates, Ron Cohen Collection (20239). Southern Folklife Collection, UNC Chapel Hill20239_pf0100_0015. Izzy Young looking in the Folklore Center, 27 July 1959. Photo by Aaron Rennert. Photo-Sound Associates, Ron Cohen Collection (20239).

 

20239_pf0097_0003. Photo by "LH," ca. 1957-1960.  Photo-Sound Associates, Ron Cohen Collection (20239). Southern Folklife Collection, UNC Chapel Hill

Tired Cat.Photo by “LH,” ca. 1957-1960. Photo-Sound Associates, Ron Cohen Collection (20239).

Cataloger’s Corner: The Dutch Hop Polka


Weingardt, Dutch Hops, Side A

The SFC has just cataloged two rare 10-inch EPs by Paul Weingardt and the Dutch Hop Boys (Vega Records, 1950, SFC call #s 78-16170, 78-16171. The first of these is pictured left.)

The polka on these records is of a special type known as the “Dutch Hop,” played and danced by the Volga Germans in the Great Plains region of the United States. (Eastern Colorado and western Nebraska are particular hotspots for the dance). The “Dutch” in “Dutch Hop” is thought to have started as a disguised version of the word “Deutsch.” During and after the World Wars, German-Americans were harshly stigmatized—and thus willing to portray their origins as Dutch rather than German.

Compared to standard polka, the Dutch Hop is faster, involves “bouncier” steps, and features a hammered dulcimer in addition to more standard instruments like the violin or the accordion. According to the Polka Page website, poor recording quality sometimes made the dulcimer hard to hear on Dutch Hop records. This may explain why the 1950 Billboard review of Weingardt’s Vega release only mentioned the “alternating accordion and violin.”Weingardt, Side B

In this excerpt from “Katy Katy Polka,” the dulcimer is indeed barely audible–one hears it as a faint plucking sound on the offbeats, at phrase endings, and under the violin solo at around 0:45.

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.

During his career, Weingardt also recorded with the Alpine Dutch Hoppers, the Alpine Polkadots, and the Polka Kings.

 

Folk Fashion from the Photo-Sound Associates

20239_pf0085_01_0028, Liz White in WNCN studios for the George Lorrie radio show, 25 May 1959. Photo by Aaron Rennert for Photo-Sound Associates. Ron Cohen Collection (20239), Southern Folklife CollectionReally enjoying the fashion of the folk scene in the Photo-Sound Associates photographs lately. We love these images of Liz White wearing an absolutely fabulous belt in the studio at WNCN-New York for George Lorrie’s radio show on May 25, 1959. Photo by Aaron Rennert for Photo-Sound Associates. See more in the Ron Cohen Collection (20239).

20239_pf0085_01_0021, Liz White in WNCN studios for the George Lorrie radio show, 25 May 1959. Photo by Aaron Rennert for Photo-Sound Associates. Ron Cohen Collection (20239), Southern Folklife Collection20239_pf0085_01_0022,Liz White in WNCN studios for the George Lorrie radio show, 25 May 1959. Photo by Aaron Rennert for Photo-Sound Associates. Ron Cohen Collection (20239), Southern Folklife Collection

Opening Friday, “Lard Have Mercy!: 30 years of Southern Culture on the Skids”

SCotS_2014_Ron Liberti Collection_Southern Folklife Collection

We’re putting the final touches on the exhibit. For a preview, see David Menconi’s article in the N&O.

Opening this Friday, the Southern Folklife Collection presents, “Lard Have Mercy! 30 Years of Southern Culture on the Skids.” The exhibit opens Friday, March 14, 2014 at 6PM on the 4th floor of the Wilson Library at UNC-Chapel Hill. The exhibit opening will be followed by a concert at Historic Playmakers Theater featuring none other than Southern Culture on the Skids. Both events occur in conjunction with the annual conference of the International Association for the Study of Popular Music (IASPM) taking place March 13-16 at UNC-Chapel Hill. Silkscreened poster pictured above made by friend of the SFC, Ron Liberti.

See y’all on Friday.

What: “Lard Have Mercy! 30 Years of Southern Culture on the Skids” opening reception

When: 6 p.m. Friday; exhibit on display through Aug. 31

Where: Fourth floor of Wilson Library, UNC-Chapel Hill

Info: 919-962-7105 orwww2.lib.unc.edu/wilson/sfc

Following Friday’s opening reception, Southern Culture on the Skids will play a 7:30 p.m. concert at UNC’s Historic Playmakers Theatre. The show is free, but tickets are required. For details, call 919-548-1203 or the Memorial Hall box office at 919-843-3333.

 

 

78 rpm disc of the week: McFarland and Gardner

78_11592_McFarland and Gardner_Southern Folklife Collection_UNC Chapel HillSome excellent classic, old-time country from Robert McFarland and Lester Gardner for you readers today. Also known as “Mac and Bob,” the duo met at the Kentucky School for the Blind in the early 1920s and recorded over 200 songs for Brunswick and other labels. They appeared regularly on the WLS Barn Dance for twenty years, retiring in 1950. Originally recorded but rejected by Brunswick, we digitized these two tracks from a disc on the Australian imprint, Regal Zonophone, SFC call no. 78-11592. “The Hut on the Back of the Lot” is at the top of the list for one of my favorite songs of 2014. Life lessons from “Little Ned.” This one’s for dear old Dad.

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.

 

 

Lard Have Mercy! 30 Years of Southern Culture on the Skids

SCOTS1The Southern Folklife Collection is pleased to announce our first exhibit and program of 2014, “Lard Have Mercy! 30 Years of Southern Culture on the Skids.” The exhibit opens Friday, March 14, 2014 at 6PM on the 4th floor of the Wilson Library at UNC-Chapel Hill. The exhibit opening will be followed by a concert at Historic Playmakers Theater featuring none other than Southern Culture on the Skids. Both events occur in conjunction with the annual conference of the International Association for the Study of Popular Music (IASPM) taking place March 13-16 at UNC-Chapel Hill.

“Lard Have Mercy” traces the history of Chapel Hill’s “Legendary Bards of Downward Mobility,” Southern Culture on the Skids (SCOTS). Formed in 1983. SCOTS embody a raucous, sleazy, good-natured, good-time take on Southern traditions and traditional music playing a unique hybrid of Americana, surf, R&B, rockabilly, and swamp pop, driving fans into ecstatic, sweat-drenched paroxysms of joy.

Featuring photography by Kent Thompson and Michael Benson as well as instruments, posters, recordings, and other ephemera from the SCOTS collection in the Southern Folklife Collection.

Events are free and open to the public but seating is limited. Concert Tickets will be available via Memorial Hall Box Office (919) 843-3333 the week of March 3rd. More information about the concert below.

Ticket booth opens: 6pm

Doors: 7pm

Concert: 7:30pm

“A HELL RAISING ROCK AND ROLL PARTY” – ROLLING STONE

scotspress

Holiday in the stacks: Doodily-doo edition

TR-12_245_Ralph Emery Show, 12_24_1971_Eugene Earle Collection One more tasty holiday treat from the Southern Folklife Collection. From the Eugene Earle Collection (20376), we have Del Reeves doodling’ away at his tune “Santa’s Boy.” This track appeared on transcription disc recording of the Ralph Emery Show, originally aired on Christmas Eve, 1971, call number TR-12-245.

Doodily-do everybody. We’ll see you next year.

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.

Transcription Disc TR/12-245

Ralph Emery Show No. 1184, 24 December 1971. Special Guest: Sonny James.

“Jingle Bells,” Roy Rogers and Dale Evans.
“Only Love Can Break a Heart,” Sonny James.
“Blue Christmas,” Elvis Presley.
“Kentucky,” Sammi Smith.
“Rudolph the Red Nosed Reindeer,” Gene Autry.
“I Heard the Bells on Christmas Day,” Ray Price.
“Santa’s Boy,” Del Reeves.
“Do You Hear What I Hear,” Sonny James.
“One’s on the Way,” Loretta Lynn.
“Here Was a Man,” Johnny Cash.
“Baby’s Smile, Woman’s Kiss,” Johnny Duncan.
“Silent Night,” Sonny James.

Holiday in the Stacks: Goldband edition

20245_pf0576_0002_Goldband Recording Corporation Collection (20245)
small_cfg More holiday tunes from the Southern Folklife Collection. This time from the great Rockin’ Sidney, master tape FT-6771 in the Goldband Recording Corporation Collection (20245). This tape was preserved in the Rivers Studio as part of a current Southern Folklife Collection digitization project, From the Piedmont to the Swamplands: Preserving Southern Traditional Music, funded by a grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities.

The legendary Count Rockin’ Sidney and the Dukes recorded well over 50 zydeco flavored R&B tracks for Shuler’s Goldband Records in the 1960s and 1970s, including this tight grooved holiday jam. From Count Rockin’ Sidney and the Southern Folklife Collection, may your X-mas be a “Soul Christmas” 

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.

FT6771 back

Rivers Dispatch: Christmas in Clarksdale (in June)

Wade Walton, Dockery Farms (ABP-15 #26)_William R. Ferris Collection_20367We’re starting our holiday party in the stacks early this year with a track from the William R. Ferris Collection (20367). This tape, call no. FT-10407, was preserved in the Rivers Studio as part of a current Southern Folklife Collection digitization project, From the Piedmont to the Swamplands: Preserving Southern Traditional Music, funded by a grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities.

Folklorist Bill Ferris celebrated Christmas in the summertime at Wade Walton’s barber shop in Clarksdale, Mississippi (pictured above). One of the patrons played a lively version of “Silent Night” before getting his hair cut. We’re not sure if the smoking monkey was involved, but one can hope. Happy holidays from the Southern Folklife Collection.

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.

FT10407_William R. Ferris Collection_20367

Noble Ray Price, the Cherokee Cowboy

P3910_Standing from left to right: KBBQ disc jockey Hugh Jarrett, musicians Ray Price and Tex Williams, and tailor Nudie Cohn. The four are backstage at the KBBQ First Anniversary Show_Southern Folklife Collection Radio and Television Files (30015)P3910. Standing from left to right: KBBQ disc jockey Hugh Jarrett, musicians Ray Price and Tex Williams, and tailor Nudie Cohn. The four are backstage at the KBBQ First Anniversary Show. Southern Folklife Collection Radio and Television Files (30015).

Country legend, Ray Price died this week at his home in Texas at the age of 87. The “Ray Price Shuffle,” a 4/4 beat developed by the Cherokee Cowboy himself remains a staple of the honky tonk sound. Combined with his velvet voice and countrypolitan ballads, Price changed the sound of Nashville. We picked out a few items from the Southern Folklife Collection to share in remembrance of Price and his lasting legacy. The photo above, P3910 from the Southern Folklife Collection Radio and Television Files (30015) features Price along with one of his great friends, fashion designer Nudie Cohn. Price could often be found on stage wearing one of Cohn’s “Nudie Suits.”  Price’s visual style remained impeccable throughout his career, but it was always his voice that separated him from the rest of the crooners. Listen to his great rendition of the Harlan Howard tune, “Heartache by the Numbers” from call no. 45-1472. 

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.

45_1472_Ray Price_Southern Folklife CollectionAnother classic from Price’s massive catalog is his hit, “Take Me As I Am (or let me go). This Don Law produced single has the full “Nashville Sound,” a full orchestra and choral arrangement to back Price’s powerful voice and make the syrupy lyrics wonderfully bittersweet. We found a unique promotional flier for the song in the Southern Folklife Collection Artist Name Files (30005), NF1596. These items are but a blip in Price’s 65 year career. We’d love to show you more but you’ll have to make a visit to Wilson Library. For now, let’s sit back and enjoy one more song.

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.

NF1596_Ray Price_Southern Folklife Collection Artist Name Files (30005)45_1858_Ray Price_Southern Folklife Collection