Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Archive for September, 2011

“Gov. Jonathan Worth, elected in 1865, had earlier in his career steered to passage the bill establishing public education in North Carolina, but he now persuaded the legislature to abolish the state school system altogether…. The governor feared that if white children were educated at public expense, ‘we will be required to educate the negroes […]

Read Full Post »

Today’s News and Observer recalls Rick Perry’s reaction to North Carolina barbecue in 1992. “I’ve had road kill that tasted better than that,” Perry is alleged to have uttered during a cook-off pitting North Carolina’s finest against West Texas barbecue at the Republican National Convention in Houston. The N&O attributes Perry’s comment to Holy Smoke: […]

Read Full Post »

“I do not deny the virgin birth,” said Baptist Max Wicker, “and I do not affirm it. My mind is still open.” This statement of position did not satisfy the board of the Southern Baptist Church in North Carolina. After a six-hour hearing, the board dismissed from their jobs: Wicker, 39, secretary of the Baptist […]

Read Full Post »

“Reporters have to battle a growing attitude on the part of state and local officers that public business is none of the public’s business. Last week North Carolina newsmen lost a round. When a vital Appropriations subcommittee, disregarding state law, denied them access to its budget hearings, capital reporters staged a sitdown in the hearing […]

Read Full Post »

“The first state to offer birth control services through its public health program was North Carolina in 1937…. “The demographic characteristics of Southern blacks — high birth rates that were not lowered by increasing economic pressure — also described poor Southern whites, though to a slightly lesser degree, and state programs tried to bring birth […]

Read Full Post »

This map depicting the coal fields of Chatham County and other mineral deposits in 1874 is the most recent addition to our North Carolina Maps online collection. It seemed as good a map as any to remind you that we’re still adding to the site. We’re now up to 3,395 maps. We’re proud of the […]

Read Full Post »

Generations of historians have labored to nail down the origin of “Tar Heel.” Less attention has been paid the alteration — shrinkage? corruption? –  of the term’s perceived meaning. Most North Carolinians seem to have accepted the nickname, with varying degrees of enthusiasm, until mid-20th century — somewhere between the University of North Carolina’s redefining […]

Read Full Post »

On this day in 1958: In New York, Harry Golden’s publisher receives an anonymous letter asking, “Do you know that your author . . . is a swindler, a cheat, and an ex-con and jail bird who has victimized widows and orphans?” In fact, almost no one knows that Golden, whose “Only in America” ranks […]

Read Full Post »

No date on this 3-inch pinback button, but the typography and the vaguely Space Age rendering of a pickle-topped hamburger suggest 1960 or so. (Is that cheese or lettuce squashed beneath the patty? Regardless, doesn’t it belong  on top?) Surprisingly, this cluster of Concord-based What-A-Burger stores (not all of which survive) is unrelated to  either […]

Read Full Post »

Looking through the collection of yearbooks from North Carolina Wesleyan College that were recently digitized by the North Carolina Digital Heritage Center, I was interested in this photo, which shows a group of students welcoming President Lyndon Johnson to Rocky Mount in 1964, the visit that resulted in the now iconic photos of the President […]

Read Full Post »

« Newer Posts - Older Posts »